Home Forums Television What is the future of broadcast television?

What is the future of broadcast television?

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
Created
9 months ago
Last Reply
4 months ago
16
( +1 hidden )
replies
2718
views
11
users
pulp50
4
Riley
2
dj
1
  • Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043515

    Thers is a lot of talk about this and variety had an interesting article about how bad they are doing. Will it die off? Discuss!

    Reply
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    dj
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043555

    I think at least one of the big 5 broadcast networks will cease to exist within the next 5-10 years or so, most likely FOX. The broadcast networks just can’t compete with cable networks and streaming in terms of quality programming, and obviously the ratings show that people are starting to get tired of the shitty content that the broadcasts continue to provide.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043580

    They’re pretty much fucked. They truly need to show FCC middle finger. Let characters curse on shows. Show some ass, tit, dick, whatever. Their shows are so basic. They don’t mind blood, guts and other disgusting stuff but cursing and nudity is a big no no for them. That’s pretty fucked up bs.

    ReplyCopy URL
    That Don Guy
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 24th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043670

    Broadcast television will always be around, as long as there is a need for things like local news. Saying that streaming and cable will destroy TV is like saying Sirius/XM and iTunes will destroy AM radio.

    Broadcast networks, on the other hand, are another matter. Okay, you have things like the Super Bowl and the Oscars that would cause an uproar if they were ever moved to cable or some other non-free service, but there must be a way to broadcast those without requiring network involvement.

    Well, when I say “always,” I see one thing that would kill it: something along the lines of universal, free, WiFi, so there would be no need to have over-the-air transmissions. However, considering that they still don’t have universal cellphone coverage in the USA, I don’t see that happening any time soon.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043861

    Broadcast television will always be around, as long as there is a need for things like local news. Saying that streaming and cable will destroy TV is like saying Sirius/XM and iTunes will destroy AM radio. Broadcast networks, on the other hand, are another matter. Okay, you have things like the Super Bowl and the Oscars that would cause an uproar if they were ever moved to cable or some other non-free service, but there must be a way to broadcast those without requiring network involvement. Well, when I say “always,” I see one thing that would kill it: something along the lines of universal, free, WiFi, so there would be no need to have over-the-air transmissions. However, considering that they still don’t have universal cellphone coverage in the USA, I don’t see that happening any time soon.

    Broadcast TV is not free. The provider cost money. Hulu will soon have live television, which eventually could be used for local news to replace broadcast television. Hulu’s package deal with the live TV  Will cost less than most providers. Eventually it would be logical for most people to shift to streaming services if this is successful.

    ReplyCopy URL
    BenitoDelicias
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 3rd, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043887

    I think their main issue is in Drama. Networks are putting out one boring show after the next while cable is showing them how it’s done with great shows, original shows and really dramatic shows with real drama.

    All the networks are offering to compete is This is Us, which will loose its ground as many of these shows do (it’s not even THAT good right now), I laugh at the fact that it was renewed already for Season 3 as if these shows don’t start their extremely slow death during their second seasons (hi, Empire, hi Revenge). They also have American Crime, but it’s not a ratings powerhouse or anything, it’s just there with its many Emmy nominations and wins for Regina King. And that’s pretty much it. They lost The Good Wife which wasn’t anything special ratings wise but at least it packed a lot into a single episode and could compete in these terms with cable shows.

    Networks managed to screw up what Lost built with one copycat show after the next failing hard. Whatever NBC did with The Office, 30 Rock and Parks is being destroyed by uninteresting shows that may have a good idea for the pilot, but quickly fizzle after a few episodes. The motherfucking multicam trend of fat guy/hot wife isn’t over, Kevin James is even doing it for a second time nine…N I N E years after he finished his first round of this, Tim Allen is still doing his schtick and Matt LeBlanc even came into this shit after doing so good with Episodes. They are still, STILL pushing Grey’s Anatomy clones down our throats, too bad for them we are not having it, police shows come and go, law dramas with Katherine Heigl can’t even see their third episode on the air.

    Networks aren’t changing. They’re not paying attention. Look at Designated Survivor. How can a show be so unbelieveably lame with the star of 24, somebody who’s responsible for showing networks what a cool show can look like and how it can change television. “OMG! There’s a 27th person who can become President if the 26 people before him die!!!!” Well, there’s a show that can sustain itself for years. NO! It can’t. “What if we put a bunch of hot people around a CIA trainee who thinks she’s princess jasmine with that hair and makeup, and just create a season long extremely uninteresting storyline each year?” No Quantico, go away.

    Cursing and telling the FCC to fuck itself isn’t the answer. Shows can still be interesting without that. But networks refuse to either make them, or let them live a little when they do. The extremely fast pushing of the CANCEL button has hurt television a lot too.

    ReplyCopy URL
    pulp50
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043888

    The big 4 networks (+cw) aren’t going away anytime soon, that’s for sure. I do think we’ll see a thinning out of cable channels, it won’t be long before most people don’t have cable at all and only have Netflix/hulu/amazon/hbo or some combination of all those subscription services. I don’t think the biggest cable channels like FX, TNT, USA, or AMC are in danger of going away in the near future, but maybe one day.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Stretchy
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 25th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043919

    I was going for the thumps up button but accidentally hit ignore on whoever posted before pulp50. How do I fix that?

    ReplyCopy URL
    pulp50
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043925

    I think their main issue is in Drama. Networks are putting out one boring show after the next while cable is showing them how it’s done with great shows, original shows and really dramatic shows with real drama.

    All the networks are offering to compete is This is Us, which will loose its ground as many of these shows do (it’s not even THAT good right now), I laugh at the fact that it was renewed already for Season 3 as if these shows don’t start their extremely slow death during their second seasons (hi, Empire, hi Revenge). They also have American Crime, but it’s not a ratings powerhouse or anything, it’s just there with its many Emmy nominations and wins for Regina King. And that’s pretty much it. They lost The Good Wife which wasn’t anything special ratings wise but at least it packed a lot into a single episode and could compete in these terms with cable shows.

    Networks managed to screw up what Lost built with one copycat show after the next failing hard. Whatever NBC did with The Office, 30 Rock and Parks is being destroyed by uninteresting shows that may have a good idea for the pilot, but quickly fizzle after a few episodes. The motherfucking multicam trend of fat guy/hot wife isn’t over, Kevin James is even doing it for a second time nine…N I N E years after he finished his first round of this, Tim Allen is still doing his schtick and Matt LeBlanc even came into this shit after doing so good with Episodes. They are still, STILL pushing Grey’s Anatomy clones down our throats, too bad for them we are not having it, police shows come and go, law dramas with Katherine Heigl can’t even see their third episode on the air.

    Networks aren’t changing. They’re not paying attention. Look at Designated Survivor. How can a show be so unbelieveably lame with the star of 24, somebody who’s responsible for showing networks what a cool show can look like and how it can change television. “OMG! There’s a 27th person who can become President if the 26 people before him die!!!!” Well, there’s a show that can sustain itself for years. NO! It can’t. “What if we put a bunch of hot people around a CIA trainee who thinks she’s princess jasmine with that hair and makeup, and just create a season long extremely uninteresting storyline each year?” No Quantico, go away.

    Cursing and telling the FCC to fuck itself isn’t the answer. Shows can still be interesting without that. But networks refuse to either make them, or let them live a little when they do. The extremely fast pushing of the CANCEL button has hurt television a lot too.

    It’s not the networks fault that people watch shitty quality television and ignore the good stuff. NCIS is the highest rated drama on tv but it’s never been a good show, while American Crime is probably the best show on network TV but no one watches it. For comedy you can make the same comparison with the Big Bang Theory and Community/Parks and Rec/30 Rock.

    ReplyCopy URL
    pulp50
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202043926

    I was going for the thumps up button but accidentally hit ignore on whoever posted before pulp50. How do I fix that?

    In your profile there’s an ignored user section.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Soccer Mom
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 16th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202044011

    I have a somewhat pessimist view.

    From an advertising standpoint, with streaming services, illegal downloads and DVRs, advertisers are starting to realize that TV is not the best medium (as opposed to social media and digital platforms) and will progressively stop sponsoring scripted (and to some extent reality) TV. With lower revenues, the investment in scripted shows by the networks will decrease and so will the quality of what actually goes into production.

    Network TV will end up having only news, sports and programming targeting older audiences that are not familiar with current technologies.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Riley
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 11th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202044221

    It’s not the networks fault that people watch shitty quality television and ignore the good stuff. NCIS is the highest rated drama on tv but it’s never been a good show, while American Crime is probably the best show on network TV but no one watches it. For comedy you can make the same comparison with the Big Bang Theory and Community/Parks and Rec/30 Rock.

    The networks only have shitty shows now because all of their good writers left for cable.  It is not like only shitty shows can have big ratings.  Look at Game of Thrones, Stranger Things and Breaking Bad.  Just about every showrunner who is still working today and ran a network show of that was at one point both highly rated and highly acclaimed has moved to cable:

    Desperate Housewives: Marc Cherry → Lifetime
    ER: John Wells → Showtime
    Friends: David Crane → Showtime
    Friends: Marta Kauffman → Netflix
    Grey’s Anatomy: Krista Vernoff → Showtime
    Heroes: Tim Kring → Freeform, USA
    House: David Shore → Amazon
    Lost: Carlton Cuse → A&E, Amazon, FX, USA
    Lost: Damon Lindelof → HBO
    NYPD Blue: David Milch → HBO
    The Office: Greg Daniels → TBS
    The Office: Jennifer Celotta → HBO
    The Office: Paul Lieberstein → HBO
    The Practice: David E. Kelley → Amazon, HBO, TNT
    Seinfeld: Larry David → HBO
    Seinfeld: Jerry Seinfeld → Crackle, Netflix
    24: Howard Gordon → FX, Showtime
    24: Joel Surnow → Reelz
    The West Wing: Aaron Sorkin → HBO
    The West Wing: John Wells → Showtime

    The showrunners/producers who have stuck with the networks are primarily known for quantity: Jerry Bruckheimer, Dick Wolf, Chuck Lorre and Shonda Rhimes.  So now Bruckheimer has three shows across Fox and CBS, Wolf has five procedurals on NBC, Lorre has three sitcoms on CBS and Rhimes has four soaps on ABC.  Even more recent finds like Dan Fogelman are being spread thin.  He had four shows across ABC, Fox and NBC in 2016.

    ReplyCopy URL
    pulp50
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202044231

    It’s not the networks fault that people watch shitty quality television and ignore the good stuff. NCIS is the highest rated drama on tv but it’s never been a good show, while American Crime is probably the best show on network TV but no one watches it. For comedy you can make the same comparison with the Big Bang Theory and Community/Parks and Rec/30 Rock.

    The networks only have shitty shows now because all of their good writers left for cable. It is not like only shitty shows can have big ratings. Look at Game of Thrones, Stranger Things and Breaking Bad. Just about every showrunner who is still working today and ran a network show of that was both highly rated and highly acclaimed has moved to cable:

    ER: John Wells → Showtime
    Friends: David Crane → Showtime
    Friends: Marta Kauffman → Netflix
    Grey’s Anatomy: Krista Vernoff → Showtime
    Heroes: Tim Kring → Freeform, USA
    House: David Shore → Amazon
    Lost: Carlton Cuse → A&E, Amazon, FX, USA
    Lost: Damon Lindelof → HBO
    NYPD Blue: David Milch → HBO
    The Office: Greg Daniels → TBS
    The Office: Jennifer Celotta → HBO
    The Office: Paul Lieberstein → HBO
    The Practice: David E. Kelley → Amazon, HBO, TNT
    Seinfeld: Larry David → HBO
    24: Howard Gordon → FX, Showtime
    24: Joel Surnow → Reelz
    The West Wing: Aaron Sorkin → HBO
    The West Wing: John Wells → Showtime

    The showrunners/producers who have stuck with the networks are primarily know for quantity and are getting spread thin: Jerry Bruckheimer, Dick Wolf, Chuck Lorre and Shonda Rhimes. So now Bruckheimer has three shows across Fox and CBS, Wolf has five procedurals on NBC, Lorre has three sitcoms on CBS and Rhimes has four soaps on ABC. Even more recent finds like Dan Fogelman are being spread thin. He had four shows across ABC, Fox and NBC in 2016.

    You make a really good point, I didn’t really think about that. Still, whenever the networks do actually come up with something good, people tend not to watch it. Cable has the same problem, I mean look at the ratings of the walking dead vs. The Americans.

    ReplyCopy URL
    eastwest
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 6th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202044271

    I would quote you, Riley but it’s late and I’m on my phone. Great breakdown of the showrunners that left and the ones that stayed. David E. Kelley has let it be known that he’s done with network. He’s probably rightfully still mad about Harry’s Law. And you forgot my nemesis in my head Greg Berlanti. He runs the CW and has stuff cooking for the other networks. The big one is a DC pilot for FOX. He’s on that with Mara and Samil Akil. They were successful showrunners for black comedy classics Girlfriends and The Game until they were screwed over by the CW. The found new success on cable with Being Mary Jane and The Game. They know have a studio deal and have come back to network with some of their pilots including the aforementioned DC one.

    As for the OP question, the future will be fine. It’ll continue to chug along with moments of brilliance here and there. I don’t think we’ll ever see a 2004-2005 season ever again though. What a time! Speaking of that, ABC (which gave the bulk of that great year) is adjusting what they want to pick up. Sista Gurl (yes, I’m garbage) that runs the show over there has made a pointed effort to go scripted since there’s more coins in doing that than serial. I rolled my eyes so hard at that since she was instrumental in the Shondaland empire and American Crime, but whatever. And now that half the country wanted to MAGA, they are catering their programming to people in the middle and the South. Smart for business, but gross.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
Reply To: What is the future of broadcast television?

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Guest2014 - Dec 14, 2017
Television
Guest2014 - Dec 13, 2017
Television