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Why are some off-Broadway transfers considered revivals and others not?

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  • Actriz
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    #433684

    Can someone explain this rule to me, I don’t understand it at all.

    Why are off-Broadway transfers like Hedwig and Violet considered revivals, but not off-Broadway transfers like Caroline, or Change or Next to Normal? Is it just because the former two were produced off-Broadway a certain amount of time before their Broadway productions? 

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    TheFinalBluth
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    #433686

    The case with shows like Hedwig and Violet is that they were off-broadway many years ago, both about 15 years ago or more. That classifies them as a “classic” even though they’ve never technically been on Broadway. 

    With shows like Caroline, or Change or Next to Normal, they transferred to Broadway almost immediately or soon after their run off-broadway. That makes them a new show. 

    It’s not quite fair to consider a show like Hedwig, which many people have known and loved for 15+ years, a “new musical” because it isn’t. It’s close to many peoples hearts already which gives it an unfair advantage in that race.

    But a rule change has now made the writers of “classics” such as Hedwig and Violet eligible for Tonys for their work in the revival category. Meaning that in the future, if a show which has never been on Broadway before, but is considered a “classic”, wins a Tony Award, the writers of the show (Stephen Trask and John Cameron Mitchell for Hedwig this year) would be honored with Tonys for their work. 

    I threw all that together pretty quickly. Hope it makes sense. 

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    SamEckmann
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    #433687

    The official Tony ruling is that if it was performed Professionally/Off-Broadway less than three years before its Broadway transfer, then it is considered a new musical. It is an effort on the Tony administrations part to account for the time and creative space necessary to make changes and raise money for a Broadway mounting which usually can take a year or two.

    So if a show premiered Off-Broadway more than three years before its Broadway premiere it is considered a revival.  Shows can also be deemed revivals if they are seen to be a “classic”, aka part of the theatre cannon because they have been around for so long despite never beign on Broadway. Or if they appeared on Broadway before the first Tony awards were given out.

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    CAROL-CHANNING
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    #433688

    Also, Off-Broadway productions like Violet, Hedwig, Assassins, Little Shop of Horrors, etc. didn’t transfer to Broadway.  They closed Off-Broadway and the productions that went to Broadway were entirely new, different productions.

    Off-Broadway productions like Caroline, or Change, etc. were direct tranfers of the same exact production of the shows. 

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