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Emmys reinstate separate categories for movies' lead and supporting actors

By Tom O'Neil
By Tom O'Neil
Apr 18 2013 22:41 pm
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Emmys Emmy Awards TV entertainment news

Just two weeks prior to the May 3 deadline for contenders to declare their category placement upon entering the Emmy race, TV academy chiefs dropped a controversial rule that combined the lead and supporting categories for movies/miniseries actors.

Previously, the Board of Governors claimed that they bunched the two classifications together because of a shortage of longform programs on TV. However, after the board met on Thursday night, the academy issued this statement to explain the curious flip-flop: "Longform production has increased.  Based on the unanticipated resurgence of television miniseries and movies, the board voted tonight to reverse the consolidation, thereby reinstating the longform lead and supporting categories in the 65th Emmy Awards competition. This year as last year, there will be separate longform categories for Outstanding Lead and Supporting, Actors and Actresses (four total categories)."

Predict all four movie/mini acting categories as well as the rest of the primetime Emmy races here

That explanation is rubbish, of course. The true reason for the policy change is because board members have grown weary of outcries over the lunacy of combining the categories in the first place. Academy chiefs won't admit it, but they tried to drop the two acting slots in order to streamline the ceremony telecast.

Similar pressure has caused the Screen Actors Guild Awards and Golden Globes to do equally ridiculous category grouping. It's illogical, but the SAG Awards have lead and supporting categories for film acting, but not TV performances. The Golden Globes have separate categories for lead actors in drama series, comedy series and movies/minis, but the supporting players in all three program genres are bunched together in races according to gender.

Why don't all of these showbiz awards just surrender to the logic of having consistent, separate award categories for lead and supporting races and spare poor telecast viewers from having to endure more inane segments full of bad jokes and lousy musical numbers by Hollywood professionals? The time is better spent focusing on TV stars with talent.

 
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