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Another World and the Daytime Emmy Awards

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  • FreemanGriffin
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    #1202607494

    I have been binge watching Another World episodes. I am surprised by how poorly it did over the years at the Daytime Emmys. It won for Best Series once (1976), and got 3 more nominations (1975, 77 & 80). Laurie Heinemann, Irene Dailey, Linda Dano, Anna Holbrook, Ellen Wheeler and Anne Heche were the actresses who won; Beverlee McKinsey, Victoria Wyndham, Jensen Buchanan, Amy Carlson, Alla Korot, Rhonda Ross Kendrick and Kathryn Harrow were actresses who were nominated. Douglass Watson and Charles Keating were the only actors who ever won. Stephen Schnetzer, Julius LaRosa, Howard E Rollins, Jr., Paul Stevens, David Forsyth and Don Scardino were nominated.

    Actresses who were never nominated for their superb performances: Constance Ford, Anna Stuart, Denise Alexander (how did she not get nominated in 1987 & 88?), Nancy Frangione, Alice Barrett, Elizabeth Franz, Beverly Penberthy, Christine Jones, Christine Andreas, Judi Evans, Kim Rhodes, Sandra Ferguson, Carmen Duncan, Alicia Coppola and Christine Tucci all deserved nominations.

    Actors who were never nominated: Mark Pinter, Robert Hogan (again, 87 & 88!), Matt Crane, David O’Brien (so memorable as Dr. Alan Glaser!), Joseph Barbara, David Andrew MacDonald and Jonathan Sharp.

    I have always felt that back in the day they needed more nominees. Back when there were more than a dozen soaps the depth of the acting was amazing. AW was often slighted over the years.

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    robbalto
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    #1202607515

    It seems that “Another World” was enormously popular in the 70s, ranking near the top of the ratings and giving the other networks a run for their money. But the ratings dwindled when the ABC lineup surged in popularity. The Emmy love continued into the early 80s, but then mostly disappeared except for the random nod here and there.

    For the most part, I did not watch “Another World.” But my grandmother did, and I caught parts of it when I visited with her. I remember watching Ellen Wheeler and Tom Eplin. I almost became hooked on it in the mid-to-late 80s, but I was already watching “As the World Turns.” That 2 pm time slot also included “One Life To Live” on ABC, so it was super competitive.

    From what I know and have heard of “Another World,” I probably would have loved it, but I just did not have the room in my viewing schedule.

    It probably did deserve more nominations than it received, and perhaps more wins. Back in the day, I was very frustrated by the repeat wins for certain performers; I was often disappointed by the nominees as well.

    “Another World” was the first daytime serial to expand to an hour, but also one of the first hour-long shows to become a casualty of that trend.

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    youngsoapfan
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    #1202607584

    Days of Our lives was always my favorite, it seemed that once 1990 hit, the nominees went back and forth between days one year, and another world for 2 years then days for one, until another world was cancelled, then it went passions, days, passions, days. until about 2008, days finally started getting overdue emmy love.

    I will never forget my favorite another world scene, where Taylor was holding Charlene captive at the amusement park, and trying to shoot her on the merry go round. Not sure why, but i loved that storyline.

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    EmmyLoser
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    #1202608432

    My family was never quite as into Another World as we were DAYS, but I remember watching both for quite a while. The last years of AW were kind of unfortunate because the show was well past its heyday and it had started migrating from its more East Coast feel to try to compete with the kinds of antics that were happening on shows like DAYS, to very poor effect. But there were always a lot of things to love about the show, and the acting was always great. Having not so extensive a history with the show, the one person who always stands out to me as just an unbelievable snub is Judi Evans, whose Paulina was just such a wonderful mess of a character and played brilliantly.

    One of the craziest things about AW is how at one point the show expanded to be 90 minutes. Imagine watching one show for 90 minutes every day!

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    FreemanGriffin
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    #1202608656

    ^Judi Evans was extraordinary as Paulina on Another World (: I have to disagree though because the show was great (for the most part) in it’s later years.

    Another World was the first show to expand to one hour, and then to 90 minutes for awhile, then back to an hour.

    Taylor was played by Christine Andreas. One of the great things about AW was the way that they would create amazing villains and villaineses and for the most part they would be one for a year or so (sometimes less) and then they would get their rightful comeuppance and they would move on.

    I have been watching the episodes I missed during a few years in the 1980’s when the local NBC affiliate didn’t air the show. Fortunately, soapnet aired everything from late 1987-1991, which was great! I miss soapnet and wish there would be a re-boot or a new network exclusively for and about soaps.

    In the 1990’s Mark Pinter memorably portrayed Sen. Grant Harrison, one of the all-time great soap villains.

    Brad Pitt had a 3 day role as a teen on the show in 1987. Morgan Freeman, Howard E Rollins Jr., Jackee Harry, Kelsey Grammer, Anne Heche, Faith Ford, just to name a few, got their starts on the show.

    I think my favorite year was 1989, with Mac’s death, and Felicia’s murder trial as the highlights. 1987 was great, esp. during Vince on the lam story, which was great.

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    robbalto
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    #1202608676

    Good call on mentioning that period where AW was 90 minutes! The show aired 2:30 – 4 for about a year and a half in 1979-1980.

    This development is a perfect example of the “bigger is better” mentality that ultimately undermined the long-term viability of daytime serials. I think it’s unrealistic to expect a writing team to write 250 hour-long episodes a year; 250 ninety-minute episodes is nothing short of insane.

    As a result of the expansion, head-writer Harding Lemay, who wrote the show through most of the 70s, resigned. In August of 1980, NBC moved AW to 2:00 and returned to a 60-minute format. Many of the characters were shifted to a spin-off called “Texas” that aired following AW in direct competition with GH and GL. Unfortunately, AW lost one of its most popular characters, Iris, to “Texas.” But “Texas” just could not compete with the mega-popular GH and the stalwart GL.

    Throughout the 70s, AW’s ratings were very high; usually, it was one of the top-ranked shows. Unfortunately, ratings declined during the period of the format/time slot changes and never really recovered. During the 80s and 90s, AW was always a distant third in comparison to its competitors, ATWT and OLTL (as well as Capitol and Search for Tomorrow for a period of time).

    Part of the reason I remember the expansion is because of a family vacation during July 1980. My family was staying in a cabin for a week. My stepsister wanted to watch AW, and I wanted to watch GH. As a compromise, I suggested that she get the tv from 2:30 – 3:15 and I get it from 3:15 – 4. But she looked at it differently. She felt that only the hour in conflict needed to be addressed. Therefore she would get 3-3:30 and I would get 3:30 -4. I think she probably won the argument. GH was super hot that summer, but that’s another example of how I picked up some of AW.

    I miss Soapnet too!

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    Boidiva02
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    #1202608916

    I think that a combination of factors doomed AW to be an also-ran at the Emmy Awards:

    The first is too much competition was the real problem here; and the fact that by the late 80’s and into the 1990’s other shows like Y&R, GH, GL and Santa Barbara were doing much more edgy, youthful storylines that seemed to really click with voters. This often meant that more traditional shows like AW, OLTL or ATWT would get ignored or overlooked.

    Especially as we got into the 1990’s the networks were really trying to woo the younger audience and storylines kept getting edgier and more youthful. On shows like GH, DOOL and Y&R this oftentimes worked, but on shows like AW, AMC and ATWT it didn’t always pan out well, often highlighting the fact that these shows in particular were more traditional.

    Also bloc-voting became a big thing in the 1990’s, with Y&R and GH often being the biggest culprits, and biggest benefactors. It was actually a big hot topic for a few years where other ABC or CBS shows would cause a big fuss around voting time accusing their networks mates of bloc-voting for themselves. For awhile there it seemed like every other year either Y&R or GH would snag the most nominations and this would irritate people from other soaps, who would vent to the press. I recall one year that cast of DOOL being particularly furious that they were overlooked in favor of multiple nods for Y&R and GH in several categories. This didn’t just hurt DOOL and AW, shows like OLTL and Loving were routinely ignored as well.

    I also think in terms of AW specifically, it became pretty clear that P&G was no longer invested in the show and was slowly doing whatever it could to kill it, so perhaps that included not mounting much effort into campaigning for AW at the Emmys.

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    DS0816
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    #1202613007

    Another World (NBC, 1964–1999) saw more individual lead-actress Emmy wins than did Guiding Light (NBC Radio, 1937–1952; CBS Television, 1952–2009) and As the World Turns (CBS, 1956–2010).

    AW won for three individuals: Laurie Heineman (1978), Irene Dailey (1979), and Linda Dano (1993).

    ATWT won for two individuals: Martha Byrne (2001) and Maura West (2007, 2010).

    GL won for two individuals: Kim Zimmer (1985, 1987, 1990, 2006) and Cynthia Watros (1998).

    I find this interesting because, with just four daytime soaps remaining (ABC’s General Hospital, CBS’ The Bold and the Beautiful and The Young and the Restless, and NBC’s Days of Our Lives), there has been more opportunity to get individuals to win in the prominent lead-acting categories. Days, for example, surpassed ATWT and GL—even though it waited 39 years to score in lead actress—with Susan Flannery (1975), Eileen Davidson (2014), and Mary Beth Evans (2016).

    The point of my mentioning this is that the 1980s, especially, and the 1990s nominations—and that Another World, for one, was underappreciated—played out that way because voters just went on reputation. All My Children (ABC, 1970–2011)—which won in best actress only with Dorothy Lyman (1983) and Susan Lucci (1999)—was routinely nominated with The Young and the Restless. We’re taking periods of 20 years with barely any break from being nominated for the top prize. It was, as USA Today’s Robert Bianco used to put it, “vote by rote.” I could count many years in which, say, seven of the lead actor and actress nomination were holdovers from the previous year. That is not credible.

    Another World and, to name one more former soap, One Life to Live (ABC, 1968–2012), fell victim to just not being on nominating Academy members’ collective minds. 25 years ago, the period of 1993 and 1994, were great for both shows. OLTL and GL split the six performance categories (lead actor, supporting actor, younger actress for GL; lead actress, supporting actress, younger actor for OLTL). They even split directing (GL) and writing (OLTL) and, yet, AMC won its second of three best-series Emmys. That year was 1994. I would have to look. But, after AW won the best-series Emmy in 1976, I don’t recall what exact year was its last having been nominated for the top prize. I don’t recall it ever nominated once during the 1980s. So, given it ended in 1999, and the 1990s were a rotating routine with AMC and Y&R joined by (but not every year) ATWT, Days, GH, and GL, well this isn’t too surprising.

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    robbalto
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    #1202613168

    I consider myself a soap historian, but I tip my hat to you, DS0816! Thank you for helping us put in perspective with your stats.

    An interesting aspect of the above post is the implication that AMC and Y&R may have received more Emmy nominations for Outstanding Drama Series in part because they were a big part of our pop culture. I had never really considered that possibility.

    But the vote by rote is something I often considered. In terms of both nominations and winners, there was always a lot of repetition. It was difficult to break into “the club,” but once you were in…

    To this day, I am excited when I see first-timers among the nominees.

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    FreemanGriffin
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    #1202613500

    The reason they changed the voting system was because people voted based on reputation and not always on merit. So many deserving nominees failed to get nominated. For a while the shows would put up I think it was 3 potential nominees per category but then it was changed to the system we have now of 10 pre-nominees. So many deserving people didn’t get nominated because people were not aware of how brilliant their performances were. (just for an example, in 1980 Kathryn Hays did great work when Dan Stewart died, Michael Zaslow and Maureen Garrett were brilliant in their marital rape storyline, Victoria Wyndham was terrific throughout that year, Ryan’s Hope had Nancy Addison, Randall Edwards, Sarah Felder, Karen Morris Gowdy all deliver stellar performances, Frances Fisher matched Emmy nominee Kim Hunter on TEON, etc.)

    It took Susan Flannery 13 years to finally get a nomination for her work as Stephanie on B&B.

    When I look over the pre-nominees list if there are equally deserving nominees and one has been nominated before, esp. many times, I will favor someone who has never been nominated before.

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    Berlin2002
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    #1202613643

    I think that a combination of factors doomed AW to be an also-ran at the Emmy Awards:

    The first is too much competition was the real problem here; and the fact that by the late 80’s and into the 1990’s other shows like Y&R, GH, GL and Santa Barbara were doing much more edgy, youthful storylines that seemed to really click with voters. This often meant that more traditional shows like AW, OLTL or ATWT would get ignored or overlooked.

    Especially as we got into the 1990’s the networks were really trying to woo the younger audience and storylines kept getting edgier and more youthful. On shows like GH, DOOL and Y&R this oftentimes worked, but on shows like AW, AMC and ATWT it didn’t always pan out well, often highlighting the fact that these shows in particular were more traditional.

    Also bloc-voting became a big thing in the 1990’s, with Y&R and GH often being the biggest culprits, and biggest benefactors. It was actually a big hot topic for a few years where other ABC or CBS shows would cause a big fuss around voting time accusing their networks mates of bloc-voting for themselves. For awhile there it seemed like every other year either Y&R or GH would snag the most nominations and this would irritate people from other soaps, who would vent to the press. I recall one year that cast of DOOL being particularly furious that they were overlooked in favor of multiple nods for Y&R and GH in several categories. This didn’t just hurt DOOL and AW, shows like OLTL and Loving were routinely ignored as well.

    I also think in terms of AW specifically, it became pretty clear that P&G was no longer invested in the show and was slowly doing whatever it could to kill it, so perhaps that included not mounting much effort into campaigning for AW at the Emmys.

    BOIDIVA you absolutely nailed it about Procter & Gamble. They owned ” Another World ” and wanted it dead. Back in it’s heyday ” Another World ” was able to secure some of the best talent in daytime because they paid extremely well. So much so that a popular starlet from another show came on board. With less than a year’s worth of seniority on AW, she thought she was entitled to make the same kind of money that Vicky Wyndham was pulling down. Thought she could leverage her demand because she was in the midst of a major storyline and a big Friday cliffhanger.P & G rightfully refused to be hardballed by the starlet of minimal talent ( in my opinion ) and called her bluff and replaced her immediately.Monday’s resolve cliffhanger opened w/ the new actress in the role. She went on to be wildly successful in the part and totally redefined the character. That was when P&G still cared about the show and was involved in almost every aspect of it. AW’s decline came when P&G got über greedy ( expanding to 90 minutes ) and under ambitious creatively. By the time the show had once again found it’s creative footing, a great deal of it’s audience was gone never to return.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  Berlin2002.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  Berlin2002.
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    FreemanGriffin
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    #1202613668

    ^Cali Timmons? Replaced by Judi Evans? I think that is who you are referring to?

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    Berlin2002
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    #1202613741

    ^Cali Timmons? Replaced by Judi Evans? I think that is who you are referring to?

    Cali Timmons/ Judi Evans is an excellent guess. The math adds up to it being Timmons/Evans except for one thing. Evans did step into ( and brilliantly might I add ) the middle of the big ” Who Shot Jake ” storyline, however when Evans assumed the role of Paulina, Jake was already blackmailing her. The actress that was replaced had her last air date on a Friday with the arc of her storyline climaxing into a big cliffhanger.Her replacement ( a far superior actress ) started on the following Monday with the proverbial ” Today the role of ___________ will now be played by ____________ ” More than likely your second guess as to the identity of the actress and her recast will be correct. SIDENOTE, I thought Cali Timmons was a terriffc actress but the character of Paulina really took off in the hands of Judi Evans. Evans brought more depth and layers to the role.

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    DS0816
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    #1202614199

    I consider myself a soap historian, but I tip my hat to you, DS0816! Thank you for helping us put in perspective with your stats.

    An interesting aspect of the above post is the implication that AMC and Y&R may have received more Emmy nominations for Outstanding Drama Series in part because they were a big part of our pop culture. I had never really considered that possibility.

    But the vote by rote is something I often considered. In terms of both nominations and winners, there was always a lot of repetition. It was difficult to break into “the club,” but once you were in…

    To this day, I am excited when I see first-timers among the nominees.

    Thank you, robbalto!

    I was the ninth member who signed up at the original GoldDerby.com, back in May 2001, and I used to commonly post about these stats—especially during Daytime Emmys season. I have since had other interests take my time—and I generally don’t post anywhere near as much as I used to.

    Here is some more more information:

    ABC’s All My Children was nominated for the top prize, outstanding drama series, for 27 consecutive years—from 1976 to 2002. (The pre-noms system, implemented in 2003, helped break the habit—it was also the year Susan Lucci stopped receiving nominations. Her 21st, and last, was in 2002. With her first nomination in 1978, she had an unbroken streak of 13 years, with nominations-numbers two to fourteen, between 1981 and 1993.)

    AMC received at least one lead-actress slot 23 consecutive years, from 1980 to 2002. But, really, it received a nomination every year since best actress was introduced in 1974 but with one exception—1979. So, had it not been for that particular year—in which nominations went to Another World’s winning Irene Dailey, Beverlee McKinsey, and Victoria Wyndham; Ryan’s Hope’s Nancy Addison and Helen Gallagher; and Days of Our Lives’ Susan Seaforth Hayes (her last nom prior to her return in 2018)—AMC would have had an unbroken streak of 29 consecutive years.

    CBS’s The Young and the Restless was nominated for outstanding drama series every year from 1985–2008—an unbroken streak of 24 consecutive years.

    NBC’s Another World was last nominated for outstanding drama series in 1980. It received five nominations. It was nominated in 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977, and 1980. AW won in 1976. (Note: The first Daytime Emmys began in 1974. Outstanding drama series Emmys were given in 1972, to NBC’s The Doctors, and in 1973, to CBS’s The Edge of Night.)

    ABC’s One Life to Live, which like AW was comparably underappreciated with regard for the top prize, for a long time, was nominated in the following years: 1973, 1983, 2000, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2013, and 2014. With OLTL, it was nominated only twice during the three decades of 1970s to 1990s despite holding the record in best actress (eleven—including five during the 1980s and four during the 1990s!); also winning best actor (two by 1983); and all other regular acting categories except younger actress (winning supporting actor in 1992 and supporting actress and younger actor in 1994). Prior to Y&R overtaking it, in the late-1980s, OLTL used to hold the record for directing and it won its first Emmy in writing in 1987. So, when OLTL finally won the Emmy for outstanding drama series, in 2002, it felt like a miracle.

    This thread is, of course, mainly about Another World and the Emmys. But, it is quite something to also realize the similar treatment given One Life to Live.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  DS0816.
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    FreemanGriffin
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    #1202614280

    ^Cali Timmons? Replaced by Judi Evans? I think that is who you are referring to?

    Cali Timmons/ Judi Evans is an excellent guess. The math adds up to it being Timmons/Evans except for one thing. Evans did step into ( and brilliantly might I add ) the middle of the big ” Who Shot Jake ” storyline, however when Evans assumed the role of Paulina, Jake was already blackmailing her. The actress that was replaced had her last air date on a Friday with the arc of her storyline climaxing into a big cliffhanger.Her replacement ( a far superior actress ) started on the following Monday with the proverbial ” Today the role of ___________ will now be played by ____________ ” More than likely your second guess as to the identity of the actress and her recast will be correct. SIDENOTE, I thought Cali Timmons was a terriffc actress but the character of Paulina really took off in the hands of Judi Evans. Evans brought more depth and layers to the role.

    I looked over the entire cast list and couldn’t find any actresses who fit your criteria – is it possible that whoever you are talking about was on the show for more than a year? I couldn’t find anyone who was on for only one year who was replaced by a superior actress, etc. Which decade did this happen? I assumed it was in the 1990’s but looked at the 1980’s as well. So who is it? (there were only two I could think of but they were on the show for more than a year and imo were both much superior to their replacements.) – I just re-read your original post and it looks like you are talking about the 1970’s? Before 1979.

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