Home Forums General Discussion News & Politics Thread (Part 5)

News & Politics Thread (Part 5)

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 221 total)
Created
7 months ago
Last Reply
5 days ago
220
( +64 hidden )
replies
28101
views
9
users
mellobruce
146
Atypical
46
The2ndAvenger
11
  • Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203286803

    6 takeaways from the Democratic debate in Iowa

    Des Moines, Iowa (CNN) Caution ruled the night of the final Democratic presidential debate before the Iowa caucuses.

    There were some clashes on stage, but the generally careful approach from the four candidates that sit atop the Iowa polls — former Vice President Joe Biden, former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren — suggested they all believe they have paths to victory and weren’t eager to change the race’s course so close to the first real test of 2020.

    The CNN/Des Moines Register debate’s most memorable moment might have come from Warren, who, in a direct pitch for her electability, made the case that a woman is best suited to beat Trump in 2020.

    Warren and Sanders, after trying to de-escalate their ongoing feud on stage during the debate, appeared to have a tense moment as candidates exited the stage. Businessman Tom Steyer was standing inches from the two during the exchange, but said afterward he had no idea what it was about, leaving everyone wondering what was said.

    Here are six takeaways from the debate:

    Warren’s pitch for a woman candidate

    Warren and Sanders remain at odds over whether he told her, during a private dinner in 2018 about the presidential election, that a woman couldn’t win — neither backed off their previous statements. But both of the populist politicians seemed intent on avoiding a debate stage crack-up.

    Instead of litigating the details of the conversation, Warren decided to use the question about it to notch a point for the female candidates of 2020 — and land a cheeky dig at the men.

    “This question about whether or not a woman can be president has been raised and it’s time for us to attack it head-on,” Warren said. “I think the best way to talk about who can win is by looking at people’s winning record. So, can a woman beat Donald Trump? Look at the men on this stage: Collectively, they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every single election that they’ve been in are the women.”

    Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the only other woman on stage, interjected, “So true. So true.”

    When asked directly about Sanders’ alleged comment, Warren offered a one-line response, again confirming what four sources told CNN about the meeting and saying she “disagreed” with the suggestion a woman couldn’t prevail in 2020. But that was as far as it went. She quickly added, “Bernie is my friend, and I am not here to try to fight with Bernie.”

    Sanders, who has denied making the remark, asked voters to look back at his past rhetoric and remember that he only ran in 2016 because Warren, who had been the subject of a draft campaign by progressives, ultimately passed on challenging Hillary Clinton for the nomination.

    “I don’t want to waste a whole lot of time on this because this is what Donald Trump and maybe some of the media want,” Sanders said. “But anybody who knows me, knows that it’s incomprehensible that I would think that a woman could not be president to the United States. Go to YouTube today. They have some video of me 30 years ago talking about how a woman could become president of the United States.”

    The foreign policy debate

    Tuesday night brought the most substantive foreign policy debate of the Democratic race to date, with tensions flaring in the Middle East bringing the issue to the forefront.

    It started with Sanders attacking Biden’s 2002 vote to authorize the use of military force in Iraq.

    “Joe and I listened to what Dick Cheney and George Bush and Rumsfeld had to say. I thought they were lying. I didn’t believe them for a moment. I took to the floor. I did everything I could to prevent that war,” Sanders said.

    Biden acknowledged that his vote was a “mistake.” But he also said former President Barack Obama — who won the 2008 Democratic presidential primary in part because of his opposition to the Iraq war — put Biden in charge of ending that war.

    “I think my record overall, on every other thing we’ve done, has been — compares to anybody on this stage,” Biden said.

    It’s a test of whether the issue that helped propel then-Sen. Barack Obama past Hillary Clinton in the 2008 Democratic race retains its political potency 12 years later.

    The foreign policy portion of the debate also allowed Buttigieg to highlight his military experience — he was a US Navy Reserve lieutenant who served in Afghanistan.

    “I’m ready to take on Donald Trump because when he gets to the tough talk and the chest-thumping, he’ll have to stand next to an American war veteran and explain how he pretended bone spurs made him ineligible to serve,” he said, referencing how Trump avoided the Vietnam War.

    The Democratic candidates also agreed that Congress needs to issue a new directive if the United States is going to continue launching new attacks under the auspices of nearly two-decade old votes.

    Warren and Buttigieg clash on health care

    A short, but direct, debate between Warren and Buttigieg on health care highlighted not only their key differences in the race, but how the two candidates are likely to go after each other in the coming months.

    The flashpoint of the back-and-forth came after Warren said the “problem” with plans like Buttigieg’s is that while they are an improvement, they are a “small improvement.”

    “That’s why it costs so much less,” she said.

    Warren supports “Medicare for All,” a sweeping health care proposal that would begin transitioning the United States to a single-payer health care system. Buttigieg, instead, has proposed a “Medicare for all who want it” plan that would not force all Americans onto government health coverage but would offer a public option for people who choose to enroll.

    Buttigieg shot back — but did so with a subtle line that highlights the Buttigieg campaign’s belief that Warren’s candidacy is divisive and would turn certain voters off.

    “It’s just not true that the plan I’m proposing is small,” Buttigieg said of Warren. “We have to move past the Washington mentality that suggests that the bigness of plans only consists of how many trillions of dollars they put through the Treasury, that the boldness of a plan consists of how many Americans it can alienate.”

    At the same time, Warren’s overarching view on Buttigieg — that he is proposing middle of the road plans that fail to excite people or fully address an issue — was laid out during the exchange.

    “The numbers that the mayor is offering don’t add up,” she said. “You can’t cover that with a kind of money that the mayor is talking about.”

    Klobuchar takes on progressive rivals

    Klobuchar needed a star turn in Tuesday’s debate to catapult her out of fifth place in Iowa — the state on which her hopes for the nomination swing.

    She positioned herself as the moderate aggressor in the progressive-against-moderate dynamic that has defined several Democratic debates and was on display again Tuesday night in portions over child care, college tuition and more.

    Sanders and Warren have advocated making tuition at public universities free. But Klobuchar argued that tax money should be focused on connecting educational opportunities with jobs that need to be filled.

    “We’re not going to have a shortage of MBAs. We’re going to have a shortage of plumbers,” she said.

    Klobuchar sought to focus on issues where a harshly divided Congress could realistically make a difference. She shined a spotlight on Americans’ struggle to afford long-term care for the aging, and she touted her efforts to lower prescription drug costs.

    Klobuchar also criticized the Senate GOP for considering going ahead with Trump’s impeachment trial without any witnesses.

    “They may as well give the President a crown and a scepter. They may as well make him king,” she said.

    Biden’s strength with black voters unchallenged

    The former vice president has arguably the single most important asset of any Democratic 2020 candidate: Deep, consistent support from black voters — the constituency that will decide the South Carolina primary and tip a large share of the delegates on Super Tuesday.
    And on Tuesday night, it went unchallenged.

    The two leading black candidates to enter the 2020 race, California Sen. Kamala Harris and New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, aggressively challenged Biden’s record on race in early debates — but both have since dropped out.

    The candidates could have steered questions over climate change, child care, health care and more toward racial injustice. With a few exceptions — most notably, Warren in her closing statement — they didn’t do so.

    It’s set the Democratic race up for a scenario where Biden could be hard to beat if he turns in strong performances in Iowa and New Hampshire, because after those two states vote, the primary shifts to states with more diverse electorates.

    Buttigieg pressed on lack of black support

    Buttigieg was asked directly about his struggle to win over black voters and said that “the black voters that know me best are supporting me,” pointing to backers in South Bend.

    He went on to say that “of course there is a much longer way to go in my community and around the country” on issues of race, he will “be a president whose personal commitment is to continue doing this work.”

    “The biggest mistake we can make is take black votes for granted. I never will,” he said.

    Buttigieg later returned to the issue — unprompted — during his closing argument, when he said, “If you’re a voter of color, feeling taken for granted by politics as usual, join me.”

    Both moments highlight the existential threat to Buttigieg’s candidacy and the fact that the former mayor knows he needs to address the issue before the primary fight turns to more diverse states like Nevada and South Carolina.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203295973

    #NeverBernie

    Pelosi held the Articles of Impeachment until a Senate trial would impact the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary.

    Candidates such as Sanders and fellow Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Michael Bennet of Colorado and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota will be forced to stay in Washington to fulfill their roles in the impeachment trial during the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary.

    “They are rigging the election again against Bernie Sanders, just like last time, only even more obviously,” Trump tweeted Friday. “They are bringing him out of so important Iowa in order that, as a Senator, he sit through the Impeachment Hoax Trial. Crazy Nancy thereby gives the strong edge to Sleepy Joe Biden, and Bernie is shut out again.”

    So sleazy!

    The Latin word sinistra originally meant “left” but took on meanings of “evil” or “unlucky” by the Classical Latin era, and this double meaning survives in European derivatives of Latin, and in the English word “sinister”.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203299684

    Boris Johnson secures Brexit! EU set to rubber-stamp deal as Queen signs it into UK law

    BRITAIN is on course for a smooth Brexit next week after Boris Johnson’s Brussels deal was finally approved by Parliament.          By Macer Hall

    After years of Westminster wrangling, the Prime Minister’s EU Withdrawal Agreement Bill is expected to be enshrined in law by gaining the Royal Assent on Thursday.

    MPs on Wednesday rejected five last-ditch amendments to the legislation made by the House of Lords.

    And peers shied away from a constitutional clash by accepting the verdict of the Commons and dropping the amendments.

    Their climbdown meant the Prime Minister’s deal with Brussels was formally ratified and the UK’s departure from the EU a week today is set to become law.

    Hailing the end of the long Westminster war over Brexit, the Prime Minister said: “Parliament has passed the Withdrawal Agreement Bill, meaning we will leave the EU on 31 January and move forward as one United Kingdom.

    Mr Johnson is expected to finalise the ratification process with EU chiefs before personally signing the historic Withdrawal Agreement.

    European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and Charles Michel are expected to sign the deal in Brussels on Friday while the Prime Minister will add his signature in the coming days.

    The European Parliament is set to rubber stamp the deal next Wednesday.

    Congratulations to Britain!

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203304906

    George Soros in Davos: 2020 Election Will Determine ‘Fate of the World

    Dems equals global governance (slavery) GOP   equals sovereignty (freedom)

     

    HILL: Davos Globalists Get Trumped Once Again

    The globalists attending the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland would like to ignore America’s success under President Trump’s economic nationalism.

    “America’s newfound prosperity is undeniable, unprecedented and unmatched anywhere in the world,” Trump proudly announced.

    Since the last time Trump came to Davos in 2018, the United States has reached and maintained its lowest unemployment rate in 50 years. We’ve enjoyed rapid and continuing wage growth, especially among the lowest-earning workers. The American stock market has repeatedly set record highs. Trade disputes are going America’s way, arranged not for the benefit of a connected class of professionals at multinational corporations but for the good of ordinary American workers.

    The Trump boom came from doing exactly the opposite of what these people have demanded of every American president for decades. He pulled out of big international projects such as the Trans Pacific Partnership, the Paris Climate Accords and the Iran deal. He successfully renegotiated our biggest free trade agreement, NAFTA, replacing it with the USMCA. He used America’s economic might as leverage to demand concessions from our less scrupulous trading partners, most importantly China.

    Every decision was supposed to spell economic disaster. Instead, his America First agenda created a strong and growing economy that continues to outperform economists’ expectations.

     

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by mellobruce.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by mellobruce.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by mellobruce.
    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203306955

    BREAKING NEWS:

    Kobe Bryant dies at age 41 in California

    (CNN) Basketball legend Kobe Bryant, 41, died Sunday morning in Los Angeles, two separate sources told CNN.

    TMZ reported Bryant was aboard a helicopter that crashed in Calabasas, California.

    Five people were killed the crash on a hillside in Calabasas, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said. There were no survivors, the Los Angeles County Fire Department said.

    The sheriff’s department received reports of the downed aircraft just after 1 p.m. ET (10 a.m PT), officials said in a tweet.

    A helicopter crashed on a hillside in Calabasas, California.

    A helicopter crashed on a hillside in Calabasas, California.

    Flames have been extinguished, the department said.

    Calabasas is about 30 miles west of Los Angeles.

    CNN’s Chloe Melas contributed to report.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    PoweR
    Joined:
    Sep 27th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203307323

    R.I.P. Kobe and Gianna.

    This made my heart drop.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Gabriel Guarin
    Joined:
    Feb 23rd, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203307502

    This was so shocking. I don’t know what to think or say.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203322748

    Britain has officially left the European Union

    From Boris Johnson’s speech today:

    This is the moment when the dawn breaks and the curtain goes up on a new act in our great national drama. And yes it is partly about using these new powers – this recaptured sovereignty – to deliver the changes people voted for.
    Whether that is by controlling immigration or creating freeports or liberating our fishing industry or doing free trade deals. Or simply making our laws and rules for the benefit of the people of this country.
    And of course I think that is the right and healthy and democratic thing to do. Because for all its strengths and for all its admirable qualities, the EU has evolved over 50 years in a direction that no longer suits this country.
    And that is a judgment that you, the people, have now confirmed at the polls. Not once but twice.

    Video of the history-making moment shows a sombre atmosphere as EU functionaries lower the flag of what had been one of the bloc’s top economic and military powers — powerful imagery symbolising the island nation setting out as a free-standing democracy once again and the diminishment of what is now a 27-member confederation.

    Who’s Nexit?

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203322789

    YEA 49 — NAY 51: Senators have voted to against allowing witnesses in the impeachment trial of Pres. Trump https://t.co/vwxdcibO1r pic.twitter.com/b1gMStPgg7
    — CBS News (@CBSNews) January 31, 2020

    The Senate is expected to hold an acquittal vote in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump next week, Republican senators told reporters on Friday evening.

    Following a closed-door Senate Republican conference meeting, Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) and Sen. Mike Braun (R-ID) said the upper chamber will vote on an organizing resolution to establish the procedures for next week’s votes. Lawmakers are expected to deliver their closing arguments on Monday and hold open deliberations Tuesday. A vote on the articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — will occur Wednesday.

    A few key Democrat senators will be shut out of the Iowa caucuses, just as planned by Pelosi and Schiff.  I am grateful there will be no interminable show trial.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203331736

    Senate Votes To Acquit President Trump
    The Senate voted on Wednesday to acquit President Donald Trump after months of investigations and testimonies.

    There were votes on the two separate articles of impeachment. The first vote was on the abuse of power article and the second was obstruction of Congress.

    The abuse of power vote final vote count was: 52 not guilty and 48 guilty.

    The obstruction of congress final vote count was: 53 not guilty and 47 guilty.

     

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by mellobruce.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by mellobruce.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by mellobruce.
    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203334169

    JAMES WOODS IS BACK!

    “I’ve tried so hard this past year to live without the wealth of knowledge available on Twitter, but this kind of blazing insight can be found nowhere else, so… I’m back! #AOCStillAMoron.”

    He added: “I was on vacation awhile, avoiding the news. How’d the #Mueller thing work out? The #impeachment scam? Who won the #Iowa caucuses? Is #MichaelAvenatti still a contender for the Democratic nomination for President? How’s #JeffreyEpstein doing?”

    U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, told Woods: “Welcome back. Avenatti won Iowa.”

    Woods responded: “Thank you, Senator. Did they arrest him yet again during his acceptance speech?”

    Woods continued his tweeting, saying: “And hopefully you will eventually be victorious in your quest to bring the #RapistClinton to justice. We will stand by you until he is behind bars (hopefully monitored by the same guards who watched over Jeffrey Epstein).”

    “I simply can’t express how honored I am by the kindness and warmth I have received by so many of my Twitter friends tonight. You are genuinely such fine people. Thank you. I am in tears.”

    Woods took direct aim at Mitt Romney, noting: “This is the guy who passes a silent stinker in the elevator and then proceeds to lecture everybody about intestinal management. You’ll never come back from this one, Mittens. Even your magic pants won’t save you. #MittTheRat

    “The irony is, Twitter accused me of affecting the political process, when in fact, their banning of me is the truly egregious interference,” Woods told the Associated Press concerning his initial suspension.

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203334207

    Iowa Caucus Disaster App Not Working in Nevada, Either

    Big surprise

    Shadow has direct ties to Democratic party establishment figures and is facing accusations that its leaders are biased against non-establishment candidates, particularly Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT).

    The firm is headed by several former campaign staffers for Hillary Clinton, while he firm’s parent organization — the non-profit group ACRONYM — has ties to Barack Obama and its CEO is reportedly married to Michael Halle, a senior strategist with the Pete Buttigieg campaign.

    Shadow said that the app was on track for a “successful rollout” with the Nevada Democratic Party.  Not.

    Shadow’s statement contradicts what Democratic leaders in Nevada said earlier this week when announcing that they would no longer use the same app or vendor as the Iowa caucus.

    “NV Dems can confidently say that what happened in the Iowa caucus will not happen in Nevada on February 22nd. We will not be employing the same app or vendor used in the Iowa caucus,” Nevada State Democratic Party Chairman William McCurdy said in a statement.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by mellobruce.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by mellobruce.
    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203342798

    7 things to watch in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary

    by Eric Bradner, Gregory Krieg and Dan Merica, CNN

    Updated 8:42 AM ET, Tue February 11, 2020

    Manchester, New Hampshire (CNN) Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is hoping to declare the sort of decisive victory that could turn the entire Democratic presidential primary in his favor Tuesday in New Hampshire.

    Former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg aims to stop him and force another close tally after their near-tie in the Iowa caucuses eight days ago.

    Former Vice President Joe Biden is just looking to avoid disaster, while Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar looks to leapfrog him and emerge as a surprise contender as the campaign moves to Nevada. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, meanwhile, needs a strong showing in her neighboring state to generate the sense of momentum her campaign has lacked in recent weeks.

    Here are seven things to watch in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary:

    1. Sanders wants to make a statement

    Sanders didn’t get the result he wanted in Iowa, but New Hampshire — a rural state with an independent streak that handed him a 22-point victory over Hillary Clinton in 2016 — is his wheelhouse.

    With so many candidates on the ballot, the margins will be much smaller this time around, but Sanders and his campaign do not want to leave here without having delivered a victory speech. In primetime. With supporters sending donations to match every applause line.

    Every recent poll of the state shows the senator from neighboring Vermont with a significant, if not runaway, lead over his nearest rival, Buttigieg.

    The pair have jousted over the last week following their narrow 1-2 finish in Iowa, where their respective campaigns claimed the top slot in an as-yet unresolved contest.

    But for Sanders, New Hampshire has to be different. There can’t be any doubt.

    A loss to Buttigieg, who is trying to establish himself as the moderate standard-bearer, would hang a dark cloud over Sanders’ campaign as the contest heads west for Nevada’s caucuses.

    Sanders figures to do well there, owing to his significant advantage with Latino voters, but anything less than a clear win in New Hampshire would upend the Democratic primary and potentially plant damaging doubts with some of his softer support: specifically, the voters who believe he is the best candidate to reclaim the white working class from President Donald Trump in November.

    2. Can Biden rebound?

    Biden’s campaign has long depended on turning a base of black voters into a win in South Carolina and a huge delegate haul on Super Tuesday.

    But after a fourth-place finish in Iowa, it’s not clear whether he can survive another weak showing and keep that base intact.

    To fix his problems, Biden tried several messages in the closing days in New Hampshire. On Saturday, he lambasted Buttigieg’s limited experience as a small-city mayor in the most negative ad of the Democratic race to date. On Sunday, he scrapped those attacks in favor of a message focused on morality. And on Monday, he opened the day telling voters how he’d try to reclaim a strong economy from Trump.

    It felt as if his campaign might have been trying every option it had to see if any worked.

    Biden has already set expectations for a loss here. On Friday, he predicted — to a national audience, in his first answer of a debate — he’d “probably take a hit” in New Hampshire, too.

    But a strong second-place finish is much different than a distant fourth or fifth.

    Biden already lags behind several of his rivals in fundraising, and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s presence in the race looms over Super Tuesday. Money drying up after another weak finish might be the most immediate threat to his campaign.

    3. How close can Buttigieg keep it?

    Buttigieg, fresh off the news that the Iowa Democratic Party has awarded him the most delegates from last week’s caucuses, has seen a substantial boost in New Hampshire.

    Polls in late 2019 found him barely in the double digits there — a CNN/University of New Hampshire survey in October put the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor at 10%. But after the Iowa caucuses, Buttigieg saw a surge; the last CNN tracking poll now has the mayor at 22%.

    By comparison, Sanders has enjoyed a consistent lead in New Hampshire.

    So, the question for Buttigieg on Tuesday is simple: Can he turn in a second-place performance and how close can he keep things with Sanders?

    The two have turned up the attacks ahead of the primary — with Sanders knocking Buttigieg for taking money from wealthy donors and the former mayor responding by casting the Vermont senator as too extreme and unbending for most voters.

    Buttigieg has touted his Iowa results in New Hampshire, but he has also looked to flatter the New Hampshire voters by describing them as people who “famously think for” themselves.

    “I’m also mindful and humbled by the fact that New Hampshire is New Hampshire,” Buttigieg said in Merrimack. “And New Hampshire is not the kind of place to let Iowa or anybody else tell you what to do.”

    But he is hoping the state listens — even a little — to Iowa.

    4. Are the walls closing in on Warren?

    She’s been relentlessly on message, preaching electability and personal durability while spelling out her signature root-and-branch plans for reforming a corrupt federal government.

    But Warren underperformed in Iowa, a state where many believed she had the savviest field operation, and only just reached double digits in CNN’s final pre-primary poll of New Hampshire.

    The Massachusetts senator doesn’t need a miracle here; just a “strong enough” showing, as her one of most devoted backers, Progressive Change Campaign Committee co-founder Adam Green told CNN this weekend, to give her a lift as the contest moves west.

    On the trail, Warren has told crowds to keep the faith — that she’s been in “unwinnable fights” before and overcome the odds.

    “I started out down 19 points, and I had never run for anything before. But every time I got knocked down, I got back up,” Warren said of her 2012 campaign to unseat incumbent Republican Sen. Scott Brown. “And I got knocked down again and I got back up. Even on Election Day, people were saying, too close to call, not sure if we’re going to do this. I beat him by seven and a half points, there’s another unwinnable fight.”

    Her chances of pulling off that kind of comeback in the Granite State appear slim.

    But what she can’t afford — perhaps literally, given the fundraising implications — is to fall out of the top tier, which would mean being overtaken by both Biden and Klobuchar.

    5. Which moderates survive?

    Buttigieg and Biden will be closely watched — but both have paths forward in the Democratic race.

    The moderate candidate with the most riding on Tuesday’s primary is Klobuchar.

    She finished fifth, on Biden’s heels, in Iowa. If her strong debate performance Friday night, when she pointedly questioned Buttigieg’s experience, catapults her as high as third place in New Hampshire — possibly ahead of the former vice president and Warren — it would scramble the Democratic race.

    Klobuchar won the most votes when a little more than two dozen New Hampshire residents in three tiny townships — Dixville Notch in the state’s northern tip, nearby Millsfield, and Hart’s Location, further south and tucked in the White Mountains — cast their ballots shortly after midnight on Tuesday.

    Klobuchar’s path forward without a surprisingly strong finish in New Hampshire is murky: She has virtually no support among non-white voters who are set to play a much larger role in the Democratic race starting in Nevada, and her late rise hasn’t allowed her to build the kind of campaign organization in Super Tuesday states that other contenders have.

    At least two other candidates in the moderate category appear to be approaching the ends of their roads.

    Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, who focused on New Hampshire with little to show for it in the polls, hasn’t qualified for a debate since last summer.

    And former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, a late entrant to the primary, hoped his neighboring state would give him a boost and carry him to South Carolina — where his bet was that Biden would collapse and leave him an opening to win over black voters. But New Hampshire may underscore the difficult of getting into a race months after others began campaigning.

    6. Are these the last days of the Yang Gang?

    Entrepreneur Andrew Yang, along with Buttigieg, was arguably the biggest surprise of the 2020 primary.

    He rose from true obscurity — when he told his family he was planning to run for president, some replied with, “President of what?” — to garnering a devout and unique following online. His focus on a universal basic income has given his campaign the sort of animating cause that eluded some of his rivals.

    But that is largely where the success ended.

    Yang finished with 1% in Iowa and did not receive a national delegate. And his campaign had to lay off staff in the days following the caucuses there, signaling that, despite Yang’s online fundraising prowess, money could be tightening.

    Yang’s top operatives believe New Hampshire, with more independent voters participating in the Democratic primary, could be better suited to backing the businessman-turned-politician. But recent polling shows Yang in the low single digits here.

    “If we don’t show as well in New Hampshire, there will be some reassessment,” said a Yang aide, “especially if it ends up being the worst-case scenario.”

    7. Gabbard practically moved to New Hampshire. Will it matter?

    Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard all but moved to New Hampshire in late 2019 — renting a house to make it easier for her to hold events nearly every day in the Granite State.

    The strategy has made her one of the most omnipresent candidates in New Hampshire, with the congresswoman even inviting supporters to go snowboarding with her this winter.

    But that ubiquity has not shown up in polls. Gabbard had 5% in the latest CNN tracking poll of New Hampshire, far behind the top tier of candidates.

    She barely registered in Iowa, meaning any long-shot bid by the lawmaker is fully dependent on her finish in New Hampshire.

    “Being able to spend time here in New Hampshire, we’re able to campaign through old school, grassroots campaigning and be competitive,” Gabbard said, knocking the complex nature of the Iowa caucuses. “That’s why we made this decision.”

    On Tuesday, Gabbard will find out if that bet was worth it.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203344157

    Bernie Sanders wins the New Hampshire primary, CNN projects
    From CNN’s Gregory Krieg

    Sen. Bernie Sanders has won the New Hampshire primary, CNN projects, clearing a key hurdle as the race moves to Nevada and South Carolina in the coming weeks.

    His victory tonight came a little more than a week after the Iowa caucuses were thrown into chaos by a failure of the state party’s vote-counting systems.

    This time around, the results were clear – and Sanders supporters at his headquarters in Manchester were free to celebrate without reservation.

    Former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who rose in the polls here after battling Sanders to a virtual tie in Iowa, ultimately fell short in his efforts to knock Sanders off course.

    Sanders won the 2016 primary here by a much larger margin, but in 2020 faced a much wider and varied field.

    Buttigieg’s solid showing and a late surge from Sen. Amy Klobuchar highlighted both the strength and continued indecision of the party’s moderate wing, who have not yet coalesced around alternative to the front-running Sanders. Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s campaign, which appears to be caught in a no-man’s land between Democrats’ ideological bases, will now face more serious questions about her path to the nomination.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    mellobruce
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203355955

    Report: Bernie Sanders Briefed that Russia Trying to Help His Campaign

    U.S. officials have warned Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) that Russia is attempting to boost his prospects of winning the White House in 2020, sources familiar with the matter told the Washington Post.

    President Donald Trump and Congressional lawmakers have also received briefings regarding the Kremlin’s efforts to help Sanders, reports the Post. In a statement to the newspaper, Sanders called Russian President Vladimir Putin a “thug” and said he stands “firmly against” any efforts to interfere in U.S. elections.

    “I don’t care, frankly, who Putin wants to be president,” Sanders said. “My message to Putin is clear: stay out of American elections, and as president I will make sure that you do.”

    Of course Russia would prefer ‘Comrade Bernie’ as president.

     

     

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 221 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
Cosmocr... - Jun 25, 2020
General Discussion
Stank83 - Jun 1, 2020
General Discussion
Stank83 - May 26, 2020
General Discussion