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News & Politics Thread (Part 5)

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    Bernie Sanders wins Nevada caucuses, CNN projects
    Aby Maeve Reston, CNN
    Updated 10:52 PM ET, Sat February 22, 2020

    (CNN) Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders will win the Nevada caucuses, according to a CNN projection, showing the power of his organization and amplifying his argument that he can broaden his appeal across the Democratic electorate based on the results from the most diverse state in Democrats’ nominating contest thus far.

    Though former Vice President Joe Biden appeared to have the lead in polls as late as January, Sanders made an enormous organizing push beginning in the middle of last year, putting some 250 paid staffers on the ground in the Silver State. His campaign also harnessed their grassroots fundraising machine to build roots within the state’s large Latino community, advertising in Spanish not only on television, radio and social media, but through ads on music streaming services like Pandora and Spotify.

    Taking the stage in San Antonio, Sanders introduced his wife Jane as the next first lady of the United States. He touted the “multigenerational, multi-racial coalition” that his campaign built in Nevada, giving his campaign a fresh burst of momentum after his win in New Hampshire and his strong showing in Iowa.

    “In Nevada, and in New Hampshire and in Iowa — what we showed is that our volunteers are prepared to knock on hundreds and hundreds of thousands of doors,” Sanders said. “That no campaign has a grassroots movement like we do, which is another reason why we’re going to win this election.”

    “(President Donald) Trump and his friends think they are going to win this election,” Sanders continued. “They think they’re going to win this election by dividing our people up, based on the color of their skin, or where they were born, or their religion or their sexual orientation. We are going to win because we are doing exactly the opposite. We’re bringing our people together.”

    Early entrance polls in Nevada showed Sanders winning Latino voters by 54%, some 40 percentage points ahead of the next candidate, former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Sanders also won among white voters; Biden led among black voters in those early snapshots of the electorate.

    The fervent support among younger voters for Sanders was evident in the Nevada results. Among the state’s voters under the age of 30 — who only made up 17% of the electorate — some 66% of them favored the Vermont senator. Biden led among caucusgoers over 65, with around a quarter supporting the former vice president. Around 1 in 5 went for Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and 1 in 8 for Buttigieg, Sanders and businessman Tom Steyer each. Around 1 in 10 caucused for Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

    Sanders also won 44% of non-white voters, according to entrance polls, a blow to Biden — who had claimed that minority voters are the base that would power him to the Democratic nomination.

    Some wondered whether Sanders would face headwinds among the considerable number of union members in Nevada after tensions flared between the powerful Culinary Union — which represents 66,000 hotel and casino workers — and Sanders supporters, because of the Culinary Union’s opposition to Sanders’ “Medicare for All” plan. The union decided not to endorse a candidate.

    The Culinary Union posted flyers throughout Las Vegas underscoring that Sanders’ plans would force them to give up the excellent health care benefits they fought for. That led to a backlash among some Sanders supporters online. In the end, it does not appear to have been a major factor in the election.

    Among Nevada voters, the overriding concern was supporting a candidate who could beat Trump. On the issues, health care was the top concern and 63% of voters said they supported a government run health care plan like the one Sanders has proposed.

    Sanders’ win was also particularly notable given the ideological split within the Nevada electorate: 30% described themselves as very liberal, 35% said they were somewhat liberal and 31% said they were moderate in entrance polls.

    Other Democrats fall short

    In an aggressive shift in his strategy, Buttigieg targeted Sanders at length during his speech in Nevada, asking voters to consider whether the senator would be the strongest nominee even though he said they “celebrate many of the same ideals.”

    “Before we rush to nominate Sen. Sanders in our one shot to take on this President, let us take a sober look at what is at stake for our party, for our values,” Buttigieg said. “There is so much on the line, and one thing we know for sure is that we absolutely must defeat Donald Trump and everything he represents.”

    Buttigieg pointed to Sanders’ embrace of Medicare for All as a major liability for Democrats heading into November, saying, “I believe we can defeat Trump and deliver for the American people by empowering the American people to make their own health care choices with Medicare for all who want it.”

    “Sen. Sanders believes in taking away that choice, removing people from having the option of a private plan and replacing it with a public plan whether you want it or not.”

    In Nevada, Buttigieg was under intense pressure to show he could appeal to minority voters as polls have consistently shown him with scant, if any, support from African Americans and Latinos.

    The Nevada results do not appear to have moved the needle much on that front. But Buttigieg, who placed first in Iowa and a close second in New Hampshire, thanked his Nevada supporters for “making this a great day for our campaign.”

    Biden, pointing to the diversity of Nevada as evidence that it would be a better fit for his campaign than Iowa and New Hampshire, had hoped for a comeback in the Silver State after his fourth and fifth place finishes in the first two states. But he still fell short — even after heavy campaigning in the past week — underscoring the uncertainty among Democratic voters over the former vice president’s stamina against Trump.

    Biden told CNN in an interview on Friday that he would consider a first or second place finish in Nevada to be a win.

    On Saturday, the former vice president, who seemed poised for a stronger finish than in Iowa and New Hampshire, offered his thanks to his labor supporters in Nevada. As he prepared to speak Saturday afternoon, a man in the audience yelled, “The Comeback Kid” — a phrase coined by Bill Clinton when he finished second in New Hampshire in 1992.

    “Well you got it!” Biden yelled back.

    “I don’t know the final results yet, but I feel really good,” said Biden, who took the stage at a time when he was a distant second to Sanders in very early results. “The press is ready to declare people dead quickly. But we’re alive, we’re coming back and we’re going to win.”

    Warren also made a vigorous push this week in Nevada, seeking a last-minute surge after she led the charge against former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg in Wednesday night’s Las Vegas debate. (Bloomberg is not competing in the state).

    Warren did not have the kind of finish her campaign hoped for after her strong debate performance, but she sought to project optimism about the upcoming contests when she appeared late Saturday in Seattle, offering her congratulations to Sanders and focusing her fire on Bloomberg.

    “Thank you for keeping me in the fight,” Warren said, noting that her campaign has raised $9 million over three days. “We have a lot of states to go. Right now I can feel the momentum, so let’s stay in this fight.”

    She zeroed in on Bloomberg and the hundreds of millions of dollars he has spent, describing him as “a threat that is coming our way.”

    “This election is not for sale. We are going to make this election about Democracy, about you,” she said.

    Warren’s strong debate performance helped her campaign cruise past its original fundraising goal, raising some $14 million over the past week. That money was a much-needed lifeline for the Warren campaign. The latest reports to the Federal Election Commission showed that she spent twice what she raised in January. Her campaign took out a $3 million line of credit to avoid running out of money.

    Steyer made an enormous investment in Nevada, ultimately plowing $15.5 million into television ads — far outpacing Sanders, who was a distant second in spending with about $2 million. Despite the exorbitant amount of money that Steyer spent in Nevada, it does not appear to have bought him much in the state.

    Klobuchar had hoped the momentum she’d built over the first two contests would continue in Nevada.

    Entrance polls showed that both Buttigieg and Klobuchar did well among late-deciding voters who made their decision over the past month. Sanders far outpaced the others among voters who decided earlier than a month ago.

    Appearing in her home state of Minnesota, which does not vote until Super Tuesday, Klobuchar was the first candidate to take the stage Saturday afternoon.

    She said that she had once again exceeded expectations, a claim that did not trend with the actual results that have been reported so far.

    “They’re counting the votes, but as usual, I think we have exceeded expectations,” Klobuchar said at her campaign headquarters in Minneapolis. “I always note that a lot of people didn’t even think that I would still be standing at this point.”

    Earlier Saturday, Klobuchar told reporters at her caucus kickoff event insider her Las Vegas office that her campaign will “be viable no matter what.”

    “We’re already running ads in Super Tuesday states,” she said. “We’re headed to South Carolina for the debate and there we go.”

    How Sanders won Nevada

    Sanders’ victory in Nevada was a credit not only to his organization and outreach in minority communities, but also the way he has transformed his 2016 upstart candidacy to the formidable operation of a front-runner.

    Four years ago, Sanders was viewed as the renegade candidate of the progressive fringe as he challenged Hillary Clinton, who defeated the Vermont senator in the Nevada caucuses but was drawn into a long and protracted race with a rival few had taken seriously.

    With the benefit of experience, reams of voter data and an unmatched ability to raise money from small-dollar donors, Sanders has built a very different campaign this time — one that increasingly seems to be convincing Democratic voters that he will be able to take on Trump.

    One of the most striking facets of the Nevada entrance polls was that Sanders won convincingly within an electorate where nearly two-thirds said beating Trump was more important than choosing a candidate who shared their views.

    It showed that Sanders is increasingly persuading Democrats that he can defeat Trump by galvanizing working class voters who feel left behind in the Trump economy and bringing new voters into the process.

    Changing the perception of Sanders has been a deliberate effort by his campaign since early 2019. Instead of simply holding rallies where he gave long, stem-winding speeches, he held more intimate events in the early states and spent much more time questioning voters about their economic struggles.

    At the same time, he continues to burnish his appeal as an outsider willing to take on the Washington establishment, including those in his own party.

    Sanders has fired up his supporters by promising to take on a lengthy list of powerful interests, from the pharmaceutical industry to the military industrial complex to the “crooks on Wall Street.”

    He has also cast his campaign as one that will drive revolutionary change in the area of economic justice, emphasizing polices like raising the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour, forgiving student loan debt, providing free college, reforming what he calls a “broken and racist” criminal justice system, and making universal health care a human right.

    In minority communities, Sanders’ campaign also made a very deliberate effort to connect with voters by sharing his family’s immigrant story. Sanders often talks on the trail about how his father came to the United States at the age of 17 without any money and minimal English skills, but was able to make a living through determination and hard work.

    This story has been updated with additional developments Saturday.

    CNN’s Daniella Diaz, Kevin Conlon, Annie Grayer, Arlette Saenz, Jeff Simon, Grace Sparks, David Wright, Jasmine Wright and Vanessa Yurkevich contributed to this report.

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    mellobruce
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    Dick Morris: ‘Bernie Will Get Massacred by Trump’

    Former Bill Clinton adviser Dick Morris said on 970 AM New York City’s “The Cats Roundtable” that Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) “will get massacred” in 2020 by President Donald Trump.

    Morris said, “Let me be clear: Bernie will get massacred by Trump. We’re not just talking about a minor defeat here. We’re talking about they lose the House. I think in the Senate, they could lose up to 60 seats. They could have up to 60 seat Republican majority, supermajority. I think that Bernie will get destroyed. I think the worst presidential defeat since McGovern.”

    In the same interview, Morris predicted that twice-failed White House candidate Hillary Clinton can clinch the Democratic nomination at a brokered convention.  

    Can anyone imagine the consequences of such an unconscionable betrayal of Bernie and his supporters?

     

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    mellobruce
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    WHY CAN’T DEMOCRATS COUNT?

    Just what is the problem here?  Count the ballots and report the counts.  Is this too complicated for the Dems?  Apparently.

    Even Pete is pissed:

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Pete Buttigieg’s campaign has questioned his third-place finish in Nevada’s caucuses and called for the state’s Democratic party to release a more detailed breakdown of votes and address reports of more than 200 problems allocating votes in Saturday’s caucuses.

     

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    Harvey Weinstein faces at least 5 years in prison after jurors convict him of a criminal sex act and rape

    (CNN) Harvey Weinstein was found guilty Monday of committing a criminal sex act in the first degree involving one woman and rape in the third degree involving another woman.

    The disgraced movie mogul faces a minimum of five years and a maximum of more than two decades in prison. He was handcuffed and taken into custody after the verdict.

    Supporters of the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements said the decision marks a “new era of justice.”

    A New York jury acquitted Weinstein, 67, on the more serious charges of predatory sexual assault involving the two women, Miriam Haley and Jessica Mann.

    In doing so, jurors indicated that they did not find beyond a reasonable doubt that Weinstein had also raped actress Annabella Sciorra, another alleged victim whose testimony prosecutors used in an attempt to establish Weinstein’s predatory behavior.

    Jurors deliberated for more than 26 hours over five days before reaching a verdict Monday morning. A motion for a mistrial by the defense earlier Monday was denied.

    It’s not clear how many years in prison Weinstein faces, as sentencing will happen at a later date.

    For the charge of criminal sex act in the first degree, he faces a minimum of five years and a maximum of 25 years in prison.

    How the charges in Harvey Weinstein's trial work

    For the charge of rape in the third degree, he essentially faces no minimum prison time and a maximum of four years.

    At least 13 officers came into the courtroom before the verdict was read and surrounded the room.

    When the verdict was read, jurors looked around the courtroom. They did not appear to look at Weinstein and may have been avoiding making eye contact with anyone.

    But Weinstein’s criminal cases aren’t over. He also faces charges of sexual assault and rape in separate incidents in Los Angeles.

    How the case unfolded

    Weinstein was charged with first-degree criminal sexual act, two counts of rape and two counts of predatory sexual assault.

    The charges are based on Haley’s testimony that Weinstein forced oral sex on her in 2006 and Mann’s testimony that he raped her in 2013 during what she described as an abusive relationship.

    Four other women, including Sciorra, also testified that Weinstein sexually attacked them as prosecutors sought to show that he used his power in the movie industry to prey on young, inexperienced women.

    Sciorra’s testimony that he raped her in the winter of 1993-1994 is outside of the statute of limitations but could have been used to support the predatory sexual assault charges, which requires serious sex crimes against at least two victims.

    Weinstein’s defense attorneys argued that the sexual encounters were consensual. As evidence, they pointed out that both Haley and Mann had sex with Weinstein after the alleged attacks, and they continued to have friendly contact with him for years afterward.

    Weinstein has also denied allegations of non-consensual sexual activity related to the other women.

    The verdict “marks a new era of justice”

    The women’s testimonies highlighted questions around consent and power dynamics at the heart of the #MeToo movement — questions that have rarely, if ever, been tested in a courtroom.

    But Tina Tchen, president and CEO of the Time’s Up Foundation, said the verdict marks an important turning point.

    “This trial — and the jury’s decision today — marks a new era of justice, not just for the Silence Breakers, who spoke out at great personal risk, but for all survivors of harassment, abuse, and assault at work,” Tchen said in a statement.

    Once an acclaimed producer of movies such as “Shakespeare in Love” and “Pulp Fiction,” Weinstein was accused by multiple women of a wide range of sexual misconduct in stories published in October 2017 in The New York Times and The New Yorker.

    A wave of accusations against men abusing their power ensued in what are now known as the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements.

    CNN’s Eric Levenson and Holly Yan contributed to this report.

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    mellobruce
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    Maybe Harvey can be sent to the Metropolitan Correctional Center after his stint at Bellevue?

    Maybe Hillary could visit him there.

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    mellobruce
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    On Tuesday Roger Stone and his lawyers appeared in court to request a new trial after it was revealed the lead juror was biased and posted tweets attacking Trump and Roger Stone.

    Stone’s lawyers asked for a new trial after it was revealed jury forewoman Tomeka Hart lied to the Court during her testimony when she claimed she didn’t really know who Roger Stone was.  Tomeka perjured herself via social media and she knew full well who Roger Stone was.  Bitch

    A far bigger bitch is the corrupt ‘judge’ Amy Vermin Jackson.

    In 2017 Judge Jackson dismissed the wrongful death suit against Hillary Clinton filed by two of the families who lost loved ones in Benghazi. The families argued that Clinton had done little to help their sons and then lied to cover it up.

    The list of her wrongdoing is too long to get into here and she is the one who should be under investigation, and charged and impeached…you do that with judges, right?  Impeach them?

     

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    mellobruce
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    Washington (CNN)

    The final “early” vote of the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination fight happens on Saturday in South Carolina.

    Is South Carolina truly Biden’s ‘firewall’?  We will see

    tomorrow

     

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    mellobruce
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    Never Biden

    “I’m looking forward to appointing the first African American woman to the United States Senate,” Biden, 77, said in a stump speech in Sumter, South Carolina Friday Feb. 28.  OK Joe.

    On Monday, Biden mistakenly proclaimed that he is a “candidate for the United States Senate” and that people could “vote for the other Biden” if they prefer one of his White House rivals. Later that day, he falsely claimed that he worked on the 2016 Paris Climate Accord with former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, who has been died for over 20 years.

    Anyone who votes for Joe truly has shit for brains, seriously.

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    Atypical
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    Joe Biden revitalizes his campaign with win in South Carolina

    (CNN) Former Vice President Joe Biden Saturday surged to a strong victory in the South Carolina primary, revitalizing a stalled presidential bid and establishing himself as the main moderate rival to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the race for the Democratic nomination.

    The 77-year-old Biden notched his first-ever nominating contest win, more than three decades after he launched the first of his three campaigns for the White House.

    Biden drank the moment in as he took the stage in Columbia, South Carolina, to make victory remarks. He looked forward to the Super Tuesday states and the upcoming race against Sanders, alluding to the Vermonter’s history as an independent.

    “If Democrats want to nominate someone who will build on Obamacare, not scrap it; take on the NRA and gun manufacturers, not protect them; stand up and give the poor a fighting chance and the middle class get restored, not raise their taxes and keep the promises we make, then join us,” Biden said. “And if the Democrats want a nominee who’s a Democrat. A lifelong Democrat. A proud Democrat. An Obama-Biden Democrat, then join us.”

    The question now is whether Biden can use South Carolina as a launchpad, two days ahead of this week’s Super Tuesday contests in 15 states and territories in which Sanders, who finished in second, is hoping to build up an unassailable lead in the delegate count.

    The contest took place in a charged political atmosphere as Democrats assail President Donald Trump over his handling of the growing coronavirus crisis, as the stock market tumbles and fears of recession threaten to reshape the 2020 battlefield. It also marked the end of the road for businessman Tom Steyer, who sunk more than $20 million into South Carolina and appeared headed for a distant third place finish in the race.

    After anemic performances in the first three nominating clashes in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada, Biden bet everything on the Palmetto State and its diverse, more moderate electorate. A loss would likely have meant a humiliating end to a half-century-long presidential career, but his win will unleash a comeback narrative.

    Biden is likely to walk away with the lion’s share of 54 pledged delegates on offer on Saturday — which represent more than half of the 101 delegates previously doled out in the contest.

    Going into Saturday, Sanders led the delegate count, with Buttigieg, Biden, Warren and Klobuchar following. Biden’s win quickly shot him into second place after 14, just a portion, of South Carolina’s delegates were projected.

    A total of 1,991 pledged delegates are needed to win the nomination at the first convention ballot.

    He can now make the case that he is the only candidate who can inspire one of the most critical slices of the Democratic electorate — African American voters. And the win raises new questions about Sanders’ claim to have broadened his demographic appeal following his failed 2016 campaign.

    Minority voters — especially in cities like Cleveland, Philadelphia, Charlotte, Atlanta and Detroit — are critical to Democratic hopes of winning back swing states that Trump claimed in 2016 and putting new battlegrounds on the map.

    Exit polls suggest that the South Carolina electorate was far more moderate and African American than the states in which Sanders has prospered. The former vice president’s securing of last-minute endorsement of the state’s political icon Rep. James Clyburn last week also appears to have been crucial.

    On stage in Columbia, Biden paid tribute to that endorsement.

    “My buddy Jim Clyburn, you brought me back,” he said.

    Biden’s win was built on a base rooted in black voters, those over the age of 65 and moderates, according to preliminary results.

    Biden won around 3 in 5 black voters, dominating over Sanders, his closest competitor who got almost 1 in 5 of the group. Steyer came close to Sanders, with around 1 in 7 black voters.

    Almost 3 in 5 voters over the age of 65 supported Biden in his run in South Carolina, followed by Steyer and Sanders with slightly more than 1 in 10.

    Biden led among moderate voters with more than half of the group supporting him. However, Biden also won over voters who consider themselves very liberal, with around 2 in 5 of the group, surpassing Sanders with 3 in 10. Warren followed Sanders with around 1 in 7 very liberal voters.

    The former Delaware senator’s big win in South Carolina also poses a challenge to former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who jumped into the race in the belief that Biden was a weak candidate.

    Bloomberg has splashed half a billion dollars on the race so far. Some party moderates fear he could siphon centrist votes away from Biden and open the door for Sanders.

    Biden’s victory represents the most significant triumph yet in a long political career that spanned highs — including his two wins on a ticket with President Barack Obama — and devastating personal losses, as he buried a wife and two of his children.

    Saturday’s result will underscore Biden’s resilience after an uninspiring campaign that has included a string of sub-par debate performances, but that has also opened a window into the former vice president’s humanity in interactions with voters who, like him, have suffered aching personal bereavements.

    “All of you who have been knocked down, counted out, left behind — this is your campaign,” Biden said to raucous cheers in Columbia.

    “We are very much alive.”

    Still, the former vice president may still have his work cut out in overhauling Sanders. While South Carolina may provide a preview of the several state contests on Tuesday, Alabama and North Carolina for instance, Sanders is favored in delegate-rich states like Texas and California.

    The former vice president’s victory will also spark intensifying questions about the viability of other candidates competing with him for the moderate lane in the Democratic primary.

    That includes Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Both candidates have failed to capitalize on encouraging performances earlier in the race.

    Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren may also emerge from Super Tuesday primaries with no clear path to the nomination — given that Sanders is beating her among the most progressive voters.

    Both Klobuchar and Warren are in danger of losing their home states to Sanders, who hopes to ride his coalition of young, liberal voters to multiple victories on Tuesday night. The Vermont senator has also made inroads with Hispanic voters over the last four years, as evidenced by his win in Nevada.

    Sanders has insisted that he should emerge as the nominee if he wins a plurality of the votes. But other candidates have not ruled out an effort to thwart him at the convention in July.

    Some party leaders are worried that Sanders and his “democratic socialism” is too extreme to win a general election. But depriving him of the nomination could convince his legions of liberal voters to stay home in November.

    Biden told reporters Saturday morning he was in good shape in South Carolina, striking a balance between underlining the importance of the race and controlling expectations.

    “I’m very optimistic, I’m optimistic not just about today, I’m optimistic about the whole process from here on out,” the former vice president said.

    “All I know is I think I’m going to do well here, and I think that’s going to put me in a position to do well in North Carolina and Alabama and other states in the Democratic primary,” Biden said. “I think I can do well but I don’t think it will even be over after Super Tuesday.”

    The writing was already on the wall for Sanders in South Carolina.

    The front-runner was campaigning Saturday in Massachusetts and Virginia, already looking to Super Tuesday.

    Trump, as is now his habit, flew to South Carolina on Friday night to goad the candidates and to underline his dominance in the state. He urged his supporters to vote for Sanders in the state’s open primary. The President wants to create as much chaos in the Democratic race as possible and his campaign team sees Sanders as their preferred opponent in November.

    Trump accused Democrats of seizing on the coronavirus, as examples of community transmission start to be discovered in the United States, as their latest “hoax” to damage him.

    A picture of the President, alongside the state’s two Republican senators, covered most of the front page of the “The State” newspaper Saturday, overshadowing they Democratic race.

    UPDATE: This story has been updated with additional developments throughout the night.

    CNN’s Grace Sparks contributed to this report.

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    Atypical
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    What symptoms to be on the lookout for and how to protect yourself from coronavirus

    (CNN) As the United States recorded its first coronavirus death — and the number of infections grows worldwide — many people are wondering what symptoms to be on the lookout for and how to protect themselves.

    There are now 71 confirmed and presumptive positive cases of coronavirus in the United States. Here’s what you should know to keep yourself safe:

    What are the symptoms

    Coronavirus makes people sick, usually with a mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illness, similar to a common cold. Its symptoms include a runny nose, cough, sore throat, headache and a fever that can last for a couple of days.

    For those with a weakened immune system, the elderly and the very young, there’s a chance the virus could cause a lower, and much more serious, respiratory tract illness like a pneumonia or bronchitis.

    How does it spread

    Transmission between humans happens when someone comes into contact with an infected person’s secretions, such as droplets in a cough.

    Depending on how virulent the virus is, a cough, sneeze or handshake could cause exposure. The virus can also be transmitted by coming into contact with something an infected person has touched and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes. Caregivers can sometimes be exposed by handling a patient’s waste, according to the CDC.

    The virus appears to mainly spread from person to person.

    “People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest),” the CDC says. “Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with … coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.”

    How is it treated

    There is no specific antiviral treatment, but research is underway.

    Most of the time, symptoms will go away on their own and experts advise seeking care early. If symptoms feel worse than a standard cold, see your doctor. Doctors can relieve symptoms by prescribing a pain or fever medication. The CDC says a room humidifier or a hot shower can help with a sore throat or cough.

    People with coronavirus should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. In some severe cases, treatment includes care to support vital organ functions, the CDC says.

    People who think they may have been exposed to the virus should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

    How long is the incubation period

    Quarantine is usually set up for the incubation period — the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For coronavirus, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar illnesses.

    How can you can prevent it

    There is no vaccine to protect against it, at least not yet.

    The US National Institutes of Health is working on a vaccine but it will be months until clinical trials get underway and more than a year until it might become available.

    Meanwhile, you may be able to reduce your risk of infection by avoiding people who are sick. Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze, and disinfect the objects and surfaces you touch.

    Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

    Awareness is also key. If you are sick and have reason to believe it may be coronavirus, you should let a health care provider know and seek treatment early.

    CNN’s Kristie Lu Stout, Jen Christensen, and Meera Senthilingam contributed to this report.

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    Atypical
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    Steyer, Buttigieg, & Klobuchar are all officially out of the 2020 presidential race. Buttigieg & Klobuchar are both mulling over Biden endorsements.

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    mellobruce
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    We truly live in interesting times, n’est-ce pas?

    Today is Super-Tuesday, not Super-Thursday, Joe.

    LOL

     

    ,

     

     

     

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    mellobruce
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    (Provided by NBC)

    DALLAS — Rivals no more, Amy Klobuchar and Pete Buttigieg united behind Joe Biden’s presidential bid on Monday as the Democratic Party’s moderate wing scrambled to boost the former vice-president just hours before voting began across a series of high-stakes Super Tuesday states.

    The urgency of the moment reflected deep concerns from the Democratic establishment that Bernie Sanders, a polarizing progressive, was positioned to seize a significant delegate lead when 14 states, one U.S. territory vote on Tuesday.

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    Atypical
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    Another veteran news stalwart fallen! Breaking news from Variety.

    CHRIS MATTHEWS DEPARTS “HARDBALL” AMID SCRUTINY
    by Brian Steinberg | Mar 2, 2020, 7:01 PM

    Chris Matthews is abruptly stepping down from MSNBC’s “Hardball” amid scrutiny of recent on-air remarks as well as speculation about behind-the-scenes behavior.

    The veteran anchor and political operative said on his program Monday night that he was leaving the cable-news outlet, putting an end to a long-running show that was featured on three different networks and part of the news landscape since 1994. Monday’s broadcast is Matthews’ last, and a rotating group of anchors is expected to lead the hour until MSNBC executives come up with more definitive plans.

    ”Let me start with my headline tonight: I’m retiring,” said Matthews, opening his first and final segment on the program. He added: “After conversations with MSNBC, I’ve decided tonight will be my last ‘Hardball.’ Let me tell you why: The younger generations out there are ready to take the reins.” He suggested younger people were bringing “better standards than we grew up with – fair standards” to the workplace, and acknowledged he had in the past addressed women in an outdated manner. “For making such comments in the past, I’m sorry,” he said.

    In less than two minutes, he signed off and handed over the hour to MSNBC anchor Steve Kornacki, who seemed taken aback by the assignment.

    Matthews had been under close watch by critics, apologizing last week after making an awkward comparison on air between Senator Bernie Sanders’ victory in the Nevada caucuses and the Nazis’ World War II takeover of France. The remark prompted public outrage from Sanders aides, and fanned complaints about MSNBC’s coverage of his campaign. “I’m sorry for comparing anything from that tragic era in which so many suffered, especially the Jewish people, to an electoral result of which you were the well-deserved winner,” Matthews said in an on-air mea culpa to the politician.

    Adding to the recent spotlight: a female journalist last week wrote an account in GQ alleging Matthews made inappropriate remarks to her while she was getting ready to appear on this show. That resurfaced reports that Matthews had been reprimanded in 1999 after a similar incident that resulted in a settlement to an employee, as well as claims that Matthews treated female politicians less respectfully.

    Some of the recent attention sped up discussions that had been taking place between the anchor and MSNBC about when he would retire, according to a person familiar with the matter, resulting in a sooner-than-expected departure. Matthews is not expected to host any sort of special program looking back at his years on the air.

    “Hardball” occupies valuable real estate. At 7 p.m., it funnels viewers into MSNBC’s primetime lineup, where advertising costs more and the cable-news networks fight with one another for the medium’s biggest audiences. MSNBC has in recent months contemplated a shift of some of its late-afternoon programs, and the absence of “Hardball” on its schedule could help those plans gain traction. One option executives have considered is expanding Nicolle Wallace’s program “Deadline: White House” to two hours from one. Her show currently airs at 4 p.m. , followed by Chuck Todd’s “MTP Daily” and “The Beat with Ari Melber.” MSNBC has also been in recent discussions with former Fox News Channel anchor Shepard Smith, who is believed to want to return to the news business with a show that would rely heavily on no-nonsense reporting.

    He built a cable-news franchise in an era when there were fewer of them, and maintained it for more than two decades. “Hardball” relied on Matthews’ long years spent in Washington, where he worked his way up from being a staffer for various Democratic candidates to a speechwriter for President Jimmy Carter and chief of staff to Tip O’Neill, the durable Speaker of the House for a decade. The show relied on its host’s penchant for being pugnacious, though not enough on most nights to distract from discussions of the political cycle. “Let’s play Hardball,” Matthews would say each night to open the proceedings.

    “Hardball” got its start on the cable network once known as “America’s Talking” in 1994.” It was based on the host’s first book, “Hardball: How Politics Is Played Told by One Who Knows the Game,” which was released in 1988. “Hardball” would move to CNBC in 1997, and then to MSNBC in 1999, where it has stayed for more than 20 years. For a time, Matthews was parodied regular on “Saturday Night Live,” with cast member Darrell Hammond impersonating him frequently.

    Matthews had a definite love for the scrum, mixing it up with journalists and politicians, even as the recent news cycle swirling around President Donald Trump, stoked to new speeds by social media, has forced cable news into faster, more aggressive programming. “People are getting home. They are hearing about it. They want the full story,” the host told Variety in 2017. The feeling, he says, “is a great rush.”

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    The latest results

    CNN projects that Joe Biden will win nine states:

    Virginia
    North Carolina
    Alabama
    Tennessee
    Oklahoma
    Minnesota
    Arkansas
    Massachusetts
    Texas

    Three states for Bernie Sanders:

    Colorado
    Utah
    Vermont

    Bloomberg won the territory of American Samoa.

    Maine and California are too close to call.

    Bloomberg out: Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is ending his campaign and endorsing Biden.

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