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  • Atypical
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    Dec 1st, 2011
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    #1205103424

    Big literary prizes month upcoming! National Book Award shortlist announced on 10/4/22, the Nobel Prize for Literature on 10/6/22, and the Booker Prize winner on 10/17/22.

    Any final predictions?

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    Donny2515
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    #1205103864

    Great news! I like such events that fully reveal the talent of the participants. I recently took part in a similar competition as a judge. After all, I am a professional writer with a lot of experience and I work for this online resource https://www.brillassignment.co.uk/business-assignment-writing/ in which we help young people solve problems with writing essays and other content.

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    Atypical
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    #1205106454

    Since no one else will, I guess I’ll have a blind go at NBA predictions (fiction only):

    Fatimah Asghar, When We Were Sisters
    Jonathan Escoffery, If I Survive You
    Tess Gunty, The Rabbit Hutch
    Gayl Jones, The Birdcatcher
    Sarah Thankam Mathews, All This Could Be Different

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    Atypical
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    #1205106456

    Here are the top names on NicerOdds for the Nobel Literature Prize:

    Michel Houellebecq
    Anne Carson
    Annie Ernaux
    Adonis
    Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
    Salman Rushdie
    Maryse Condé
    Jon Fosse
    Haruki Murakami
    Jamaica Kincaid
    Karl Ove Knausgård
    Garielle Lutz
    Margaret Atwood
    Can Xue
    Pierre Michon
    Stephen King
    Hélène Cixous
    Lyudmila Ulitskaya
    Robert Coover
    Salim Barakat

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    Atypical
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    #1205106460

    Lots of chatter supporting Salman Rushdie’s laureate chances post-attack from August. One of those recent thinkpieces here:
    —————————————————————
    It’s Time for Salman Rushdie’s Nobel Prize

    His literary accomplishments richly merit recognition from the Swedish Academy—and the prize would be a symbolic rebuke to the enemies of the free word.

    by David Remnick
    THE NEW YORKER
    August 28, 2022

    SRNL

    n 1901, the Swedish Academy bestowed the first Nobel Prize in Literature on Sully Prudhomme, a French poet of modest distinction in his time and barely remembered in our own. At the award ceremony, in Stockholm, the Academy’s Permanent Secretary, Carl David af Wirsén, extolled Prudhomme’s “introvert nature,” which he judged “as sensitive as it is delicate.” Wirsén went on in this decorous manner, never revealing that the Academy, in its deliberations, had considered giving the prize to Leo Tolstoy or Émile Zola. Later reporting revealed that Tolstoy’s sixteen subsequent nominations may have failed for ideological reasons; the Academy apparently took issue with his “half-rationalistic, half-mystic spirit.”

    Any prize that is not purely objective—as, say, the gold medal for the hundred-metre dash is objective—is bound, at some point, to go to some suspect recipients. In 1942, “Citizen Kane” lost the Best Picture Oscar to “How Green Was My Valley.” Even the wisest jury can miss the mark. And yet the Swedish Academy may have abused the privilege of fallibility. In time, Prudhomme was joined in the history of dubious literature Nobels by Rudolf Eucken, Paul Heyse, Władysław Reymont, Erik Axel Karlfeldt, Verner von Heidenstam, Winston Churchill, Pearl S. Buck, and Dario Fo. The list of non-Nobelists includes Joyce, Proust, Chekhov, Musil, Wharton, Woolf, Kafka, Brecht, Borges, Akhmatova, Rilke, Orwell, Lorca, Twain, Baldwin, Achebe, and Murakami, and stretches on from there. Despite this folly, the Nobel Prize remains an object of such desire that it can induce a kind of rueful despair in authors who wait in vain for the call from Stockholm. When Bob Dylan won the Nobel, in 2016, Philip Roth told friends how tickled he was for Dylan, and added that he only hoped that the following year’s award would go to Peter, Paul and Mary.

    In October, the Swedish Academy will have the opportunity both to chip away at its record of overlooking many of the most profound writers in its field of vision and to help correct its woeful hesitation in standing up for the values it ought to champion. In the mid-nineteen-eighties, Salman Rushdie’s masterpieces, “Midnight’s Children” and “Shame,” had been translated into Persian and were admired in Iran as expressions of anti-imperialism. Everything changed on February 14, 1989, when Ayatollah Khomeini condemned as blasphemous “The Satanic Verses,” a novel that he hadn’t bothered to read, and issued a fatwa calling for the author’s death. Khomeini’s edict helped inspire book burnings and vicious demonstrations against Rushdie from Karachi to London.

    Rushdie, who could never have anticipated such a reaction to his work, spent much of the next decade in hiding and under heavy guard. The literary world was hardly unanimous in his defense. Roald Dahl, John Berger, and John le Carré were some of the writers who judged Rushdie to have been insufficiently attentive to clerical sensitivities in Tehran. Among the more cowardly acts of the time was the Swedish Academy’s refusal to issue a statement in support of Rushdie. The Academy waited twenty-seven years—a period during which booksellers in the United States and in Europe were firebombed and Rushdie’s Japanese translator was murdered––before it roused itself to condemn the fatwa as a “serious violation of free speech.” Stern stuff.

    Rushdie, for his part, behaved with impeccable bravery and, even more remarkably, with good humor. As he put it in a recent essay, “While I had not chosen the battle, it was at least the right battle, because in it everything that I loved and valued (literature, freedom, irreverence, freedom, irreligion, freedom) was ranged against everything I detested (fanaticism, violence, bigotry, humorlessness, philistinism, and the new offense culture of the age).”

    Through it all, Rushdie never stopped writing, and, eventually, he emerged from his highly sequestered existence and resumed teaching, lecturing, and enjoying himself. The tabloids seemed aghast that he would dare go to parties, concerts, and ballgames, as if this somehow undermined his standing as a hero of the free word. He didn’t care. He was so insistent on living his life without performing the role of a “Statue of Liberty,” as he put it, that he played himself on an episode of “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” counselling Larry David on the forbidden pleasures of “fatwa sex.” Solzhenitsyn was capable of many deeds, but not that.

    At the same time, no one in our era has been a more tireless champion of free speech. As an essayist and as the president of pen America, Rushdie spoke up for artists, writers, and journalists everywhere who were under assault. He has been especially vigilant in recent years about threats to free expression in the two largest democracies: India, where he was born and raised, and the United States, his adopted home for the past two decades. His judgments could sting. When a group of six writers refused to attend a pen gala, in 2015, because it was honoring the editors of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Rushdie said, “If pen as a free-speech organization can’t defend and celebrate people who have been murdered for drawing pictures, then frankly the organization is not worth the name.” Of the writers who spurned the dinner, he said, “I hope nobody ever comes after them.”

    Rushdie is seventy-five. Even though the current Iranian Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, effectively renewed the fatwa against him in 2017, the edict seemed to have lost its power. Rushdie almost never had bodyguards with him when he appeared in public. Earlier this month, after Rushdie took the stage to speak to a large audience at the Chautauqua Institution, in western New York, a young man in a black mask jumped him and stabbed him multiple times. Rushdie’s injuries are severe and will demand, according to his agent, Andrew Wylie, a prolonged period of recovery.

    As a literary artist, Rushdie is richly deserving of the Nobel, and the case is only augmented by his role as an uncompromising defender of freedom and a symbol of resiliency. No such gesture could reverse the wave of illiberalism that has engulfed so much of the world. But, after all its bewildering choices, the Swedish Academy has the opportunity, by answering the ugliness of a state-issued death sentence with the dignity of its highest award, to rebuke all the clerics, autocrats, and demagogues—including our own—who would galvanize their followers at the expense of human liberty. Freedom of expression, as Rushdie’s ordeal reminds us, has never come free, but the prize is worth the price. ♦

    Published in the print edition of the September 5, 2022, issue, with the headline “Nobel Gesture.”

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    Atypical
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    #1205106604

    2022 NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS SHORTLISTS:

    FICTION

    The Rabbit Hutch
    Tess Gunty
    Alfred A. Knopf/Penguin Random House

    The Haunting of Hajji Hotak & Other Stories
    Jamil Jan Kochai
    Viking Books/Penguin Random House

    The Birdcatcher
    Gayl Jones
    Beacon Press

    All This Could Be Different
    Sarah Thankam Mathews
    Viking Books/Penguin Random House

    The Town of Babylon
    Alejandro Varela
    Astra House/Astra Publishing House

    NONFICTION

    The Invisible Kingdom: Reimagining Chronic Illness
    Meghan O’Rourke
    Riverhead Books/Penguin Random House

    South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation
    Imani Perry
    Ecco/HarperCollins Publishers

    Breathless: The Scientific Race to Defeat a Deadly Virus
    David Quammen
    Simon & Schuster

    The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir
    Ingrid Rojas Contreras
    Doubleday/Penguin Random House

    His Name Is George Floyd: One Man’s Life & the Struggle for Racial Justice
    Robert Samuels, Toluse Olorunnipa
    Viking Books/Penguin Random House

    POETRY

    Look at This Blue
    Allison Adelle Hedge Coke
    Coffee House Press

    Punks: New & Selected Poems
    John Keene
    The Song Cave

    Balladz
    Sharon Olds
    Alfred A. Knopf/Penguin Random House

    Best Barbarian
    Roger Reeves
    W. W. Norton & Company

    The Rupture Tense
    Jenny Xie
    Graywolf Press

    TRANSLATED LITERATURE

    A New Name: Septology VI-VII
    Jon Fosse, Damion Searls
    Transit Books

    Kibogo
    Scholastique Mukasonga, Mark Polizzotti
    Archipelago Books

    Jawbone
    Mónica Ojeda, Sarah Booker
    Coffee House Press

    Seven Empty Houses
    Samanta Schweblin, Megan McDowell
    Riverhead Books/Penguin Random House

    Scattered All Over the Earth
    Yoko Tawada, Margaret Mitsutani
    New Directions Publishing

    YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE

    The Ogress & the Orphans
    Kelly Barnhill
    Algonquin Young Readers/Workman Publishing

    The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School
    Sonora Reyes
    Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins Publishers

    Victory. Stand!: Raising My Fist for Justice
    Tommie Smith, Derrick Barnes, & Dawud Anyabwile
    Norton Young Readers/W. W. Norton & Company

    All My Rage
    Sabaa Tahir
    Razorbill/Penguin Random House

    Maizy Chen’s Last Chance
    Lisa Yee
    Random House Books for Young Readers/Penguin Random House

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    Atypical
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    #1205108501

    The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2022 is awarded to the French author Annie Ernaux,

    for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements, and collective restraints of personal memory.

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    babypook
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
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    #1205117629

    Rereading The Sunne in Splendour, for Sharon Kay Penman, who passed last year.
    Queens of the Conquest, Alison Weir

    The Sunne in Splendour.
    I prefer my roses white

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    Atypical
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    #1205124042

    Shehan Karunatilaka wins Booker prize for The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida

    Judges described the Sri Lankan author’s second novel as a “rollercoaster journey through life and death” and praised its audacity and ambition.

    Sarah Shaffi
    Mon 17 Oct 2022 16.51 EDT
    THE GUARDIAN

    SK7M2

    The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Sri Lankan author Shehan Karunatilaka has won the Booker prize for fiction. The judges praised the “ambition of its scope, and the hilarious audacity of its narrative techniques.”

    Karunatilaka’s second novel, The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida comes more than a decade after his debut, Chinaman, which was published in 2011. The Booker-winning novel tells the story of the photographer of its title, who in 1990 wakes up dead in what seems like a celestial visa office. With no idea who killed him, Maali has seven moons to contact the people he loves most and lead them to a hidden cache of photos of civil war atrocities that will rock Sri Lanka.

    Neil MacGregor, chair of the judges for this year’s prize, said the novel was chosen because “it’s a book that takes the reader on a rollercoaster journey through life and death right to what the author describes as the dark heart of the world.”

    “And there the reader finds, to their surprise, joy, tenderness, love, and loyalty,” he added.

    MacGregor was joined on the judging panel by academic and broadcaster Shahidha Bari; historian Helen Castor; novelist and critic M John Harrison; and novelist, poet and professor Alain Mabanckou. The judges were unanimous in their decision to award the prize to Karunatilaka, according to the chair.

    This year the original 1969 Booker prize trophy was reinstated in memory of its creator, the children’s author and illustrator Jan Pieńkowski, who died in February.

    The trophy was presented to Karunatilaka by Camilla, the Queen Consort, in one of her first official public engagements since she took on her new role, at a ceremony hosted by comedian Sophie Duker at the Roundhouse in London. Last year’s winner Damon Galgut presented Karunatilaka with his prize money of £50,000 (over $56,000). A prize of £2,500 (about $2,800) is awarded to each of the six shortlisted authors.

    The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida is published by the independent press Sort of Books. This year is the first time a book by the publisher has been longlisted for the prize. Karunatilaka has become the second Sri Lankan-born author to win, following Michael Ondaatje, who won in 1992 with The English Patient. (Last year, the Sri Lankan writer Anuk Arudpragasam was shortlisted for “A Passage North.”)

    In his Guardian review, Tomiwa Owolade said the book’s “scenarios are often absurd … but executed with a humour and pathos that ground the reader.” He added: “Karunatilaka has done artistic justice to a terrible period in his country’s history.”

    Karunatilaka, was born in Galle, Sri Lanka, in 1975 and grew up in Colombo. Chinaman won the Commonwealth prize, the DSL, and the Gratiaen prize, and was selected for the BBC and The Reading Agency’s Big Jubilee Read. The author has also written rock songs and screenplays.

    The other books on the shortlist were Glory by NoViolet Bulawayo, The Trees by Percival Everett, Treacle Walker by Alan Garner, Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan, and Oh William! by Elizabeth Strout.

    MacGregor said that although all six books on the shortlist were very different, “it became clear … that they were all really about one question, and that is ‘what’s the importance of an individual life?’”

    Filmed extracts from the shortlisted books, directed by Kevin Thomas and starring Nikki Amuka-Bird, Jarvis Cocker, Anna Friel, David Harewood, Sharon Horgan, and Prasanna Puwanarajah, were shown during the ceremony.

    Singer-songwriter Dua Lipa delivered a keynote speech on how her love of reading helped her connect with her family and identity. She said early obsessions included Roald Dahl and Malorie Blackman, “both of whom gave me little pearls of wisdom that still guide me today.”

    Earlier this year, the singer launched a podcast called At Your Service, with guests including Hanya Yanagihara and Min Jin Lee. She said speaking one-to-one with some of her favorite authors was “honestly better than any therapy session I’ve ever been to.”

    The ceremony was broadcast as part of a 45-minute Front Row special on BBC Radio 4, where presenter Samira Ahmed interviewed British-Turkish author Elif Shafak about what the attack on Salman Rushdie’s life means for writers around the world. The ceremony also paid tribute to double-Booker winner Hilary Mantel, who died in September.

    While the prize was previously open only to writers from Britain, Ireland, the Commonwealth, and Zimbabwe, the judges changed the rules in 2014, and opened it up to all English-language authors whose work is released in Britain or Ireland.

    Past winners include literary giants like V.S. Naipaul, Kazuo Ishiguro, Salman Rushdie, Margaret Atwood, Ian McEwan, and Hilary Mantel, and the prize has launched the careers of debut novelists like Douglas Stuart, Arundhati Roy, and Aravind Adiga.

    In accepting the award, Karunatilaka said he hoped the novel would be read and taken to heart in his home country, and that it might one day be regarded as a work of pure fantasy, rather than as a political satire.

    “My hope for Seven Moons is this: that in the not too distant future, 10 years or whatever it takes, that it is read in a Sri Lanka that has understood that these ideas of corruption and race baiting and cronyism have not worked, and will never work,” he said. “I hope it’s read in a Sri Lanka that learns from its stories.”

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    Atypical
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    #1205136414

    Finished reading Nightcrawling by Leila Mottley. Startling debut novel that kept me engrossed from beginning to end. It’s mind-blowing that she wrote this in high school. I’m unfamiliar with the real-life case that it’s based on, but I’m interested in learning more. I’m betting the corrupt Oakland Police Department faced no real repercussions for what happened to these exploited women, or implemented no safeguards to prevent this from happening again in the future. The only slight for me was some overwritten stretches that could have been tightened up with another strong editorial pass or two. For the story told here, short and lean would have made this even more impactful. Impressive effort overall, and once Mottley reaches her professional peak, watch out. Highly recommended.

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    Atypical
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    #1205136426

    Many best-of lists are starting to populate. Here’s Publishers Weekly Top 10 List of 2022 (combination of fiction & nonfiction):

    Activities of Daily Living
    Lisa Hsiao Chen

    All the Lovers in the Night
    Mieko Kawakami, translated from the Japanese by Sam Bett & David Boyd

    The Birdcatcher
    Gayl Jones

    Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands
    Kate Beaton

    The Furrows
    Namwali Serpell

    G-Man: J. Edgar Hoover & the Making of the American Century
    Beverly Gage

    The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family
    Kerri K. Greenidge

    An Immense World: How Animal Senses Reveal the Hidden Realms Around Us
    Ed Yong

    The Invisible Kingdom: Reimagining Chronic Illness
    Meghan O’Rourke

    The Rabbit Hutch
    Tess Gunty

    https://best-books.publishersweekly.com/pw/best-books/2022

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    #1205136804
    This post was found to be inappropriate by the moderators and has been removed.

    Atypical
    Joined:
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    #1205145149

    Suzette Mayr wins $100K Scotiabank Giller Prize for novel The Sleeping Car Porter
    CBC Books · Posted: Nov 07, 2022 9:59 PM ET | Last Updated: 8 hours ago

    SM

    Suzette Mayr won the 2022 Scotiabank Giller Prize for her novel The Sleeping Car Porter on Monday, Nov. 7.

    The Scotiabank Giller Prize awards $100,000 to the year’s best work of Canadian fiction. The ceremony was co-hosted by bestselling poet Rupi Kaur and Alias Grace star Sarah Gadon.

    The ceremony was broadcast on CBC TV, CBC Gem, CBC Listen, and CBC Radio at 9 p.m. local time (11:30 AT/12 midnight NT) and streamed online at CBC Books, YouTube, and Facebook at 9 p.m. ET.

    This year the prize celebrates its 29th anniversary. The hour-long show features all the shortlisted books, revealing the winner at the end.

    The five finalists:

    Lesser Known Monsters of the 21st Century by Kim Fu
    Stray Dogs by Rawi Hage
    The Sleeping Car Porter by Suzette Mayr
    If an Egyptian Cannot Speak English by Noor Naga
    We Measure the Earth With Our Bodies by Tsering Yangzom Lama

    Canadian author Casey Plett chaired the five-person jury panel this year. She was joined by Canadian authors Kaie Kellough and Waubgeshig Rice, and American writers Katie Kitamura and Scott Spencer.

    Last year’s winner was Omar El Akkad for his novel What Strange Paradise.

    Other past Giller Prize winners include Souvankham Thammavongsa for How to Pronounce Knife, Esi Edugyan for Washington Black, Michael Redhill for Bellevue Square, Margaret Atwood for Alias Grace, Mordecai Richler for Barney’s Version, Alice Munro for Runaway, André Alexis for Fifteen Dogs, and Madeleine Thien for Do Not Say We Have Nothing.

    Toronto businessman Jack Rabinovitch founded the prize in honour of his late wife, literary journalist Doris Giller, in 1994. Rabinovitch died in 2017 at the age of 87.

    Mayr is a poet and novelist based in Calgary. She is the author of the novels Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall, Monoceros, Moon Honey, The Widows, and Venous Hum. Monoceros won the ReLit Award, the City of Calgary W. O. Mitchell Book Prize, and made the 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize longlist.

    Mayr is a past president of the Writers’ Guild of Alberta, and has been teaching creative writing at the University of Calgary since 2003.

    “I want to acknowledge the importance of the sleeping car porters—the men and the communities around them who are an essential part of Canadian history and whom I wrote about in this book,” said Mayr in her acceptance speech.

    “And a final shout out to my LGBTQIA2S+ sisters, brothers, and siblings, many of whom, like my main character Baxter, are still too scared to come out or cannot come out because to do so would be too dangerous. I love you and this book is for you,” said Mayr to a standing ovation.

    The Sleeping Car Porter, Mayr’s sixth novel, tells the story of Baxter, a Black man in 1929 who works as a sleeping-car porter on a train that travels across the country. He smiles and tries to be invisible to the passengers, but what he really wants is to save up and go to dentistry school. On one particular trip out west, the train is stalled and Baxter finds a naughty postcard of two gay men. The postcard reawakens his memories and longings and puts his job in jeopardy.

    “It’s really important that Black people become part of the fabric of the history of this country. It gets a little tiring when the only time you talk about it is in February, because it’s Black History Month. It’s every month. It’s everywhere,” Mayr said in an interview with CBC Books.

    SG52022

    This year’s shortlist marked the first time the finalist books were all written by BIPOC Canadian authors.

    “I wrote it because it was a book I wanted to read that I wasn’t finding anywhere at all,” Mayr told CBC Books.

    “I found that a lot of the stories about the sleeping car porters tended to concentrate on the union organizing and the labour movement and Black rights in general—but I felt like there was a lack there in terms of queer experience. Because I couldn’t find that book, I decided that I would be the one to write that book.”

    The jury read 138 submitted books, narrowed it down to a longlist of 14 and then a shortlist of five.

    “As only occurs in the finest historical novels, every page in The Sleeping Car Porter feels alive and immediate—and eerily contemporary,” said the jury in a statement.

    “The sleeping car porter in this sleek, stylish novel is named R.T. Baxter—called George by the people upon whom he waits, as is every other Black porter. Baxter’s dream of one day going to school to learn dentistry coexists with his secret life as a gay man, and in Mayr’s triumphant novel we follow him not only from Montreal to Calgary, but into and out of the lives of an indelibly etched cast of supporting characters, and, finally, into a beautifully rendered radiance.”

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    Atypical
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    #1205157065

    2022 National Book Awards Winners List (ceremony ongoing):

    YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE

    All My Rage
    Sabaa Tahir
    Razorbill/Penguin Random House

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    Atypical
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    #1205157090

    TRANSLATED LITERATURE

    Seven Empty Houses
    Samanta Schweblin; Translation by Megan McDowell
    Riverhead Books/Penguin Random House

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