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2023 Oscars: Best Actress (Part 8)

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  • Matheus Vaz
    Joined:
    Nov 1st, 2019
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    #1205100811

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js Translated: ‘A Mulher Rei (The Woman King)’ debuts at the TOP of Brazilian cinemas and raises more than R$5 million (~1M US Dollars). The feature film starring Viola Davis surpassed ‘The Orphan 2’ and the re-release of ‘Avatar’. “Brazil, you will always have my heart,” celebrated Davis.

    us brazillians have taste wbk


    MysticMagix
    Joined:
    Feb 23rd, 2017
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    #1205100874

    Get ready yall, the blonde fans are coming

    A little bit of Magic never hurt anybody.

    ~ MYSTIC


    Rosso
    Joined:
    Aug 7th, 2022
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    #1205100879

    Calling the film pointless is a very baseless criticism but as I said before, you are entitled to that opinion.

    Thank you for your input; however, I think you misinterpreted what I said about the film’s philosophical musings being “pointless.” Instead, I came to that conclusion because of its recursive and reductive solution to combating [political, social, economic] nihilism with a band-aid fix of finding solace and healing generational trauma through familial love—which is, ironically, as non-philosophical, non-inquisitive, and ahistorical as it gets.

    How do we reconcile the interlocking themes of generational trauma and familial love without interrogating the Confucian family state that has invaded the psyche of Chinese lineage? How do material conditions shape the fragmented, Asian-American identity? How does the motion of diaspora (an inherently economic activity that is contingent on capital expansion and, as such, labor exploitation [which also could be tied to Evelyn’s laundromat]) disrupt the rhythm of cultural experiences; thus, consequently altering as well perceptions of more “progressive” topics like queer love (which was also dealt rather hastily in the film)?

    These questions may be on the periphery, considering how EEAAO is committed to its message about meaning-making in chaos. However, it is irrefutable that the film begins in crisis and ends in apotheosis with an Asian-American family. Yet, the dynamics of change from one to the other are simply truncated by a multi-universe traversal towards love as end-all-be-all and uses that as a shortcut to “address” the lived/raced experiences of Evelyn and her family. I suppose I would have liked it more if the family in question was utilized as a microcosm of their surroundings, quite like how Ozu instrumentalizes the fleeting family as a signpost of postwar impermanence—the increasingly industrialized Japan as a result of the increasingly encroaching of US hegemony.

    For a film that prides itself in showcasing underseen Asian talent, engaging with metatextuality, and featuring the trendy, multiverse premise, much more could have been explored. Ultimately, the insufficiency of “family is love” as the solution to nihilism, as a pervading force among the layered realities and structural conditions of Asian-American immigrants, betrays any sort of inviting insight in my regard. The lesson may be universally touching, but it is also so hammered down that it left no further philosophizing.

    Anyways, this has been too long. I understand why many of y’all love it, and I’m not side-eyeing anyone who does so because there is a charm to the movie, after all.


    laslo
    Joined:
    Oct 19th, 2021
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    #1205100916

    Thank you for your input; however, I think you misinterpreted what I said about the film’s philosophical musings being “pointless.” Instead, I came to that conclusion because of its recursive and reductive solution to combating [political, social, economic] nihilism with a band-aid fix of finding solace and healing generational trauma through familial love—which is, ironically, as non-philosophical, non-inquisitive, and ahistorical as it gets. How do we reconcile the interlocking themes of generational trauma and familial love without interrogating the Confucian family state that has invaded the psyche of Chinese lineage? How do material conditions shape the fragmented, Asian-American identity? How does the motion of diaspora (an inherently economic activity that is contingent on capital expansion and, as such, labor exploitation [which also could be tied to Evelyn’s laundromat]) disrupt the rhythm of cultural experiences; thus, consequently altering as well perceptions of more “progressive” topics like queer love (which was also dealt rather hastily in the film)? These questions may be on the periphery, considering how EEAAO is committed to its message about meaning-making in chaos. However, it is irrefutable that the film begins in crisis and ends in apotheosis with an Asian-American family. Yet, the dynamics of change from one to the other are simply truncated by a multi-universe traversal towards love as end-all-be-all and uses that as a shortcut to “address” the lived/raced experiences of Evelyn and her family. I suppose I would have liked it more if the family in question was utilized as a microcosm of their surroundings, quite like how Ozu instrumentalizes the fleeting family as a signpost of postwar impermanence—the increasingly industrialized Japan as a result of the increasingly encroaching of US hegemony. For a film that prides itself in showcasing underseen Asian talent, engaging with metatextuality, and featuring the trendy, multiverse premise, much more could have been explored. Ultimately, the insufficiency of “family is love” as the solution to nihilism, as a pervading force among the layered realities and structural conditions of Asian-American immigrants, betrays any sort of inviting insight in my regard. The lesson may be universally touching, but it is also so hammered down that it left no further philosophizing. Anyways, this has been too long. I understand why many of y’all love it, and I’m not side-eyeing anyone who does so because there is a charm to the movie, after all.

    I hope I didn’t come off as rude because sometimes people misunderstand me here, I just wanted to discuss my view that disagrees with yours regarding this movie.
    I understand that the social and economic context of a Chinese immigrant family is intrinsic to the reality that the film tries to portray. However, what I meant in my previous post is that I think you looked for a point that the movie didn’t try to make. They used a more rudimentary sentiment and philosophical question to fuel their narrative, not necessarily to combat pessimist sentiments with a simplistic solution. I don’t think the film uses family love as a way of fighting political, social, economic nihilism, but rather as a way of showing that the love in the relationship between the characters is stronger than all the other problems they face in an infinite universe of possibilities. Love is not the solution to all the problems this family faces, but it should certainly be treated as a priority among the many other feelings that can arise from a difficult life. What the film proposes is a slightly simpler/decontextualized but more inclusive view of a family crisis, which can be a point of identification for anyone watching the film. And I still believe that the visual and conceptual execution of this film is impeccable, and that in philosophical matters this film goes further than 95% of films made recently. Anyway, we don’t need to keep exchanging messages, I understand your point of view and I believe you understand mine.


    sister jude
    Joined:
    Jul 25th, 2021
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    #1205100965

    EEAAO might get a couple of noms bur it aint gonna be this juggernaut y’all think. I personally think it is overrated and michelle yeoh is just good to me. An asian actress that should be nominated is Han yeri from Minari. THis is a cool fun popcorn movie.

    EEAAO was not good and yeoh was just okay.  she’s being pushed hard because of the diversity thing. it should be okay to say that her performance isn’t remotely oscar worthy. and i don’t thing the film is the juggernaut y’all making it out to be.


    MysticMagix
    Joined:
    Feb 23rd, 2017
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    #1205100983

    I can appreciate what eeao is trying to be. But my god is the film horribly confusing, written poorly (to me) and very mid. But, i see why some may like it.

    Unfortunately my fave performance in it was jamie lee curtis. And the daughter was ok too. But its no get out (if we r talking genre films) or even black panther.

     

    A little bit of Magic never hurt anybody.

    ~ MYSTIC


    leon375
    Joined:
    Sep 10th, 2013
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    #1205100989

    She said might be a contender for Best Picture. Hopefully Carey Mulligan gets another oscar nom.


    Rosso
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    Aug 7th, 2022
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    #1205100994

    Anyway, we don’t need to keep exchanging messages, I understand your point of view and I believe you understand mine.

    Oh you weren’t rude at all, lol. It’s just an online discussion, after all.

    I think this is where you and I draw the line, though: the fact that their identities were intrinsic in the first place (from marketing to narrative weight to its metatextual endeavors and to its Oscar campaign) only makes me crave more depth than originally presented. I guess this is where my critique lies so much — the film retreating to perfunctory identity politics that barely scratches the conditions they attempt to represent. The fact that the film also begins with tension against the IRS immediately pushes the lived immigrant experience to the forefront of introspection. It’s the resolution (and the odyssey towards it) that betrays.


    hillslight
    Joined:
    Feb 14th, 2021
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    #1205101017

    She is coming


    nevkm
    Joined:
    Jan 3rd, 2018
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    #1205101020

    She is coming

    Cate is fantastic as expected but the sound work in this

     


    BurgerFriesSoda
    Joined:
    Sep 3rd, 2022
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    #1205101031

    She is coming

    This trailer paired with the reviews has made me move this into my top 5 for picture and I’m more sure now Field is a director contender. I can understand the “coldness” leading to doubts, but now I can’t get over how many artists would be able to connect to this story when it comes time to voting.


    MD
    Joined:
    Dec 25th, 2017
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    #1205101033

    This looks amazing and deliciously dark. Inject it into my veins 👏


    Jacob "Oscar Boy" Boe
    Joined:
    Apr 20th, 2019
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    #1205101035

    I don’t think Spencer is comparable to EEAAO at all. Also, Stewart and Yeoh have very different profiles

    and also… Stewart got in

    Top Ten 2022 Films:
    1. Everything Everywhere All At Once
    2. The Fabelmans
    3. The Banshees of Inisherin
    4. The Batman
    5. TAR
    6. Top Gun: Maverick
    7. Bros
    8. The Woman King
    9. Elvis
    10. The Menu


    GD
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2016
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    #1205101039

    Predictions for Best Actress 2023 :

    Cate Blanchett – Tár

    Viola Davis – The Woman King

    Jennifer Lawrence – Causeway

    Michelle Williams – The Fabelmans

    Michelle Yeoh – Everything Everywhere All at Once

    Could happen :

    Olivia Colman – Empire of Light

    Danielle Deadwyller – Till

    Margot Robbie – Babylon

    Ana de Armas – Blonde

     


    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
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    #1205101043
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