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Cannes 2018 with President Blanchett

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  • AMG
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    Under The Silver Lake First Reactions

    Alissa Wilkinson: UNDER THE SILVER LAKE is pretty pitch perfect as postmodern pastiche sunshine noir with rootless hipster East LA positioned as the end of history, which isn’t for everyone, but definitely for me 

    Miriam Bale: I could not hate UNDER THE SILVER LAKE more. A complete turd. If you loved INHERENT VICE, you will hate UNDER THE SILVER LAKE. But also if you hated INHERENT VICE, you’ll probably hate UNDER THE SILVER LAKE.

    Mani Lazic: UNDER THE SILVER LAKE is the worst film I’ve seen in a very long time. Why would you impose 2 hours and 20min of such meaningless bullshit on people? What does David Robert Mitchell want from us?  

    Emma Stefansky: I lost track of all the classic Hollywood references crammed into UNDER THE SILVER LAKE about an hour in, but was charmed by its stylish, hazy flair and how it embraced the American cinema mythology that living in LA is like living in a dream  

    Emily Yoshida: UNDER THE SILVER LAKE is exactly the kind of thing I want from this festival – ambitious, flawed, a vision. An LA film through and through,not just in setting but in its pace and cuckoo logic and knowingly ridiculous male gaze.

    Beatrice Behn:  Under the Silver Lake fails terrifically. I love its potential, its knowledge of film history, pop culture, its camera and meta-dialogue. But alas, it loses itself in the overcomplicated plot & the slow pacing becomes a drag. But still: I want to see more of Mitchell.

    Elena Lazic: I was bored out of my mind for the entirety of the juvenile, predictable UNDER THE SILVER LAKE, then the impossibly dumb ending made it even worse. A monumental waste of time.

    Ella Kemp: UNDER THE SILVER LAKE convinced me it was so many different movies and I loved all of them.  

    Gregory Ellwood: Under the Silver Lake is A LOT. Probably too much, but you can’t say David Robert Mitchell doesn’t have a vision. He’s just got a ton of them in one move.  

    Guy Lodge: (C) Pulling off a genuinely haphazard-feeling hang movie actually takes a lot of structural finesse, and I don’t feel it here: fun to start with, but there’s no dreamy momentum to it. Garfield carries it just right; shame it’s so uniformly lousy on women.

    Bilge Ebiri: UNDER THE SILVER LAKE: I might have liked that more in a world where Paul Thomas Anderson & David Lynch didn’t already exist.

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    AMG
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    UN CERTAIN REGARD Euforia First Reactions

    Another Gaze: Valeria Golino’s EUFORIA cleverly masters the economics of illness and ideas around charity as a rich man orchestrates his dying brother’s final weeks. An examination of what we can & cannot control, tied together with rich ideas on Catholicism, technology & nature  

    David Cox: Valeria Golino’s aptly-named EUFORIA is one of my favourite films at Cannes, hugely life-affirming and very much deserves all the claps.

    Nauval Yazid: Valeria Golino’s Euforia feels like and old pair of shoes: well-worn, but comforting and warm. The kind of film you will revisit for leisure.

    Filmgeist: Two estranged brothers spend time together as they face the spectre of death. A bittersweet drama embued with Roman vitality, charm and laughs. With top notch performance by Riccardo Scamarcio and Valerio Mastandrea

    Emilio M Luna: Death as an excuse for a fraternal reconstruction is the axis of Euforia by Valeria Golino, a simple premise, without artifice, that ends up moving without much effort but also without leaving a mark. Decent.  

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    AMG
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    UN CERTAIN REGARD Sofia First Reactions

    Sophie Monks Kaufman: SOFIA has a humane run-time of 80 minutes. And it’s good! In a quietly-biting feminist critique of Moroccan pregnancy codes kind of a way.  

    Annabel Fuder: Sofia, or the butterfly effect. With minimal staging and a lot of emotion, Martha Benm’barek makes a delicate film where a young girl sacrifices herself to protect the honour of her family. Deeply moving!

    Joseph Fahim: And the dishonorable worst Middle Eastern movie of Cannes 2018  goes to Meryem Benm’Barek’s ‘Sofia’. A predictable, soapy, hammily-acted melodrama with a central female character that is,surprise surprise, is another victim of a sexual predator.Reductive,disposable and infuriating.

    Fabien Lemercier: Buoyed by an excellent script, this first full-length film by Meryem Benm’Barek is a thrilling feminist study, dissecting the double standards that divide Moroccan society

    Filmgeist: a personal, heartfelt take on the terrible hardship unmarried women face in Morocco when they become pregnant. Wonderfully acted by Maha Alemi and Sarah Perles. A true gem.

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    Pollo crudo
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    Don’t know what to think about Under the Silver Lake, very polarizing among critics. Can’t make an idea of what’s the film like

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    AMG
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    Burning First Reactions

    Emma Stefansky: BURNING is the slowest of burns, a leisurely noir that gradually paints an unsettling that gets weirder as it goes picture. The score is fantastic. Steven Yeun is utterly chilling  

    Alisha Rouse: In the spirit of clawing some time back after a good film that would have benefited from a 2hr cut, Burning summarised: First hour – a man snored next to me. Last 1hr 25m – excellent. Ends.  

    Mani Lazic: BURNING: the most unexpected mystery thriller, doesn’t follow any rules in the book & hits you with emotion by surprise. An assured & totally mesmerising slow-burn, yes!

    Jessica Kiang:  Brimful to overflowing with BURNING love.

    Alex Billington: Burning – Lee Chang-dong’s super slow burn thriller unravels in a very meticulous way. At two and a half hours, it’s a tough one to follow but kept me riveted at least. Has a dark core to look for if you’re into Korean thrillers like this.

    Peter Bradshaw:  Lee Chang-dong’s Burning is superbly shot and scored – a mystery thriller of obsessive love based on a Murakami story, but with something of Patricia Highsmith or maybe a Ruth Rendell novel that Chabrol might have filmed.

    Jordan Hoffman: Let it be known that Lee Chang-Dong’s BURNING features the magic hour marijuana haze dance sequence of the year and it is set to Miles Davis’ ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS. The rest of the movie is pretty substantially wow wow wow too.

    David Ehrlich: Burning is a masterpiece

    Douglas Greenwood: BURNING lures you in as a love story, and then tears you in two 150 minutes later as something completely different. So good looking it’s almost painful. Jun Jong-Seo is a goddamn star already.

    Joesph Owen:  Lee Chang-Dong’s BURNING starts like Cat Person and ends freezing its nuts off. Just need to track the bits in between. The oleaginous, sadistic, Faulkner-reading Gatsby is a bastard modernist for today. Liked it 

    David Jenkins: It’s late in the fest, raining and I’m hungry, so will just say that Lee Chang-dong’s Burning is pretty amazing. The slowest of slow burns, the grandest of pay-offs.  

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    Pollo crudo
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    Wow! Burning has the highest scores yet, in ionCinema even better than Toni Erdmann, but still is an oddball, maybe more like a Jury Prize winner than a Palme.

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    Pollo crudo
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    The Franco-Brazilian-Portuguese production, ‘Diamantino‘, just won La semaine de la critique. The funny thing is it was the lowest rated film of the section by ICS critics panel.

    The short film award went to ‘Hector Malot – The Last Day Of The Year‘, a Greek production.

    SACD prize was given to ‘Woman at War‘, Icelandic-French-Ukranian film. The predictable winner.

    Other prizes: GAN (distribution award) for the Franco-Indian ‘Sir‘. And Sauvage’s protagonist, Felix Maritaud, the Rising Star Award.

    http://variety.com/2018/film/awards/cannes-critics-week-prize-winner-1202812295/

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    AMG
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    UN CERTAIN REGARD The Dead & The Others First Reactions

    James McAllister: João Salaviza & Renée Nader Messora’s THE DEAD AND THE OTHERS is a slow, thoughtful observation on changing civilisations, cultural identity and self-reflection. Too loose at the outset, but a moving, and rewarding watch for those willing to stick it out  

    Martyn Conterio: The Dead and The Others is a coming-of-age flick unlike any I’ve ever seen. Tackles themes of loss, stress, depression, displacement and outsiderdom and the high contrast 16mm impressionistic cinematography is glorious!

    Filmgeist: João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora’s The Dead And The Others is the magnificient and spritual exploration of a Brazilian native Krahô young man’s struggle to deal with his father’s death amid shamanism and the radical cultural clash with Western society

    Victor Esquirol: João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora make the ethnographic documentary as a gateway to a world that, in principle, neither the camera nor the microphone could capture. Shamanic rite to pass, without notice, of reality to an almost palpable magic 

    Stephen Dalton: As an experiment in collaborative, exploratory docudrama, The Dead and the Others is an admirably committed enterprise. Sadly, as a cinematic experience, it is flat and functional.

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    AMG
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    UN CERTAIN REGARD The Gentle Indifference of the World First Reactions

    Pat Mullen: THE GENTLE INDIFFERENCE OF THE WORLD is a delicately observed and carefully measured reflection on the dire state of humanity.

    Martyn Conterio: The Gentle Indifference of the World wants to be an existentialist take on Murnau’s Sunrise. A brilliant first act but it petered out, for me. Dinara Batkybayeva is excellent in the lead role.

    Redmond Bacon: Kaurismaki meets Kazakhstan in the cool collected The Gentle Indifference of the world. The very definition of a comic almost zen vision of tragedy.

    Independent Cinema Office: Adilkhan Yerzhanov’s THE GENTLE INDIFFERENCE OF THE WORLD brings some beautiful images from Kazakhstan, though pacing may be a problem for broader audiences

    Melik Sahtas: “The gentle difference of the world” is one of the most useful films of Un Certain Regard, which resembles a Kazakhstan-made Hal Hartley movie, with many things in his music atmosphere… Adilkhan Yerzhanov is a very ingenious filmmaker. 

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    AMG
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    UN CERTAIN REGARD In My Room First Reactions

    David Jenkins: Jeez, the new Ulrich Köhler film, In My Room, is simple and brilliant.

    Screen Comment: The why and the how in Ulrich Köhler’s IN MY ROOM do not matter. The existential questions the film raises, however, are legion. Fascinating film. Mr. Köhler, I hope to see you in competition at Cannes 2019

    Ramon Rey:  The premise of in MY ROOM is not very original, but it is worth his psychological approach to the characters and the simple but powerful discourse that elaborates with minimal resources. Very well projected the conflict against the environment in images and their moral sense

    Victor Esquirol: Ulrich Köhler invokes the fear of empty space to take us to an end of the striking world but not very surprising. Well in the human portrait of the ordinary in the extraordinary; Not so much plotting a plot line. The proposal ends up quite stagnant

    Dandelion Spring: In My Room was a well-made take on the ‘only person left in the world’ trope but it soon turned predictable and consequentially uninteresting, and features an oddly saccharine ending.  

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    AMG
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    Dogman First Reactions

    Jamie Graham: Desolate shorelines & beautiful shots of ugly, hardscrabble landscapes populated by idiosyncratic ‘lowlifes’ engaged in petty crime… There’s something of Fellini’s early neorealist films to Matteo Garrone’s commendable Dogman. Plus, a supporting cast of mighty mutts

    Mani Lazic: a quiet life disturbed by crime, full of funny moments that becomes an absurdist nightmare. Much lighter than GOMORRA but a great central performance. And so many good doggos! 

    Veronika K Zajdela: Welcome back to the top, Mr. Garrone.

    Alex Billington: Loved this. But that’s obvious, it’s a dog movie. Matteo Garrone’s latest is not profound but it is simply satisfying, all about a humble Italian dog groomer getting back at a bully. No animals were harmed in my enjoyment this film.

    Tomasco Tocci: Nobody in Italy builds stories on faces and places like Garrone. When put in service of genre, he makes the best damn genre cinema you can hope for. A lean, compact micro-thriller. It’s actually the opposite of GOMORRA, going back to his early films instead. 

    Robbie Collin: Matteo Garrone’s Dogman is a darkly funny frontier (im)morality tale closer in tone to Gomorrah than his more fantastical recent stuff, but the Fellini carnival spirit endures. And *so many* good boys. Loved!

    AA Dowd: Not a whole lot going on in DOGMAN, which kept my interest but didn’t really take its theme of misplaced loyalty anywhere especially surprising. The lead performance is quite strong, though.

    David Ehrlich: Matteo Garrone’s DOGMAN is a well-shot, beautifully acted, and thuddingly obvious parable about fascism and poodles. not strong enough to stick in the mind on day 3892 of #Cannes2018 .

    Jordan Ruimy: There have been 4 or 5 films in this year’s competition that I would call indisputably great, Matteo Garrone’s DOGMAN is most definitely one of them. Marcello Fonte is almost a cinch to win best actor at Cannes this year, think a gaunt, younger version of Pacino.

    Peter Bradshaw: Matteo Garrone’s Dogman is a compelling opera of beta-male criminal martyrdom – it actually comes closer to explaining the emotional inadequacy of gangsterism than Gomorrah.

    Peter Howell: Matteo Garrone’s “urban western” of meek dog groomer’s complicated relationship with violent neighbourhood bully is more of a character study and morality play, but great storytelling by any definition. Best Actor for Marcello Fonte!  

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    AMG
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    All the films competing in Un Certain Regard have screened, so here is a ranking (pure guesswork) Of how they seem to rank based on the first reactions:

    Un Certain Regard
    1. Girl
    2. Donbass
    3. In My Room
    4. Long Days Journey Into Night
    5. The Gentle Indifference Of The World
    6. Little Tickles
    7. The Angel
    8. The Harvesters
    9. Sofia
    10. Manto
    11. The Dead & The Others
    12. Euphoria
    13. Sextape
    14. My Favourite Fabric
    15. Rafiki
    16. Die Monster Die
    17. Angel Face
    18. Border

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    Pollo crudo
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    My own guess, based on first reactions and also in possibility of winning in my opinion:

    1. Donbass
    2. Euforia
    3. Border
    4. Long Day’s Journey into Night
    5. The Harvesters
    6. The Gentle Indifference of the World
    7. Girl
    8. Murder Me, Monster
    9. Manto
    10. Death and the Others
    11. Rafiki
    12. In My Room
    13. Sofia
    14. Les chatouilles
    15. El Ángel
    16. My Favorite Fabric
    17. Sextape
    18. Angel Face

    My guess in director would be ‘Border’, in Certain Jury ‘Euforia’, Special Prize for ‘Rafiki’, FIPRESCI for ‘Long Day’s Journey Into Night’. Maybe an acting award for ‘Girl’ protagonist. The Harvesters may be up to the main prize too.

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    AMG
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    Capernaum First Reactions

    Jamie Graham: Kids surviving on the streets in Lebanese drama Capharnaum. Compassionate, harrowing social-realism from writer-director Nadine Labaki. Superbly made and acted. Has a real shot at the Palme d’Or  

    Michelle Morgan: Just got out of CAPHARNAUM directed by Nadine Labaki. Gutted. This will won the Palm D’Or

    Ali Benz: CAPHARNAUM is good. Masterful build-up but very Spielberg-y last act. Nadine Labaki directed her 2 main actors to perfection. Zain Alrafeea gave a performance I’ll put very high on every list that deals with excellence in acting.  

    Dave Calhoun: Wish I’d actually put some money on my hunch that Nadine Labaki would win the Palme d’Or…

    Ben Croll: CAPHARNAÜM may not be the best world cinema art film playing at #cannes71  but it’s certainly the MOST world cinema art film.

    Caspar Salmon: Nadine Labaki’s CAPHARNAUM: a verdict in two parts. Part one: critical verdict. CAPHARNAUM is a sweeping, moving political drama full of humanity and sorrow, with an inhabited central performance by the lead child actor. Part two: appallingly non-critical verdict. CAPHARNAUM broke me in two. I started sobbing half way through and can’t seem to stop.

    Xan Brooks: Capharnaum (Nadine Labaki) the most emotionally harrowing film I’ve seen at Cannes 2018. Destitute runaway, big bad city, abandoned toddler. Scrape me up off the floor, I’m done

    James McAllister: Nadine Labaki’s CAPHARNAUM sure ain’t subtle, but it hits *hard*. At times deeply flaws, at others staggeringly sad. I’ll be shocked if this doesn’t win the Palme!

    Jason Gorber: Moving, impactful work that touches on the survival instinct of a young boy and other economic refugees. Comparisons to FLORIDA PROJECT and even CITY OF GOD, it’s a film with a straight forward narrative that’s likely to have massive audience reaction

    Robbie Collin: Nadine Labaki’s sensational Capernaum turns a street kid’s struggle into a kind of social-realist blockbuster. Middle hour is so crazily ambitious I’m not clear how she pulled it off: watch this win the Palme on Saturday, maybe the foreign language Oscar next.

    Martyn Conterio: What a shame Nadine Labaki munsons things with Spielberg type schmaltz at the end of Capernaum. It touches true greatness until late in the third act. The kid was phenomenal.  

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    Pollo crudo
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    Climax‘ the film of Argentine director, Gaspar Noé, triumphs at the Director’s Fortnight. (Quinzaine des réalisateurs). It was very well received by audiences and critics alike, so everyone is happy I guess.

    The SACD prize went for ‘En Liberté!‘ by Pierre Salvadori.

    Lucia’s Grace‘ got the support of Europa Cinemas Network.

    Short Film Award is for ‘Skip Day‘.

    Earlier this day the Cinéfondation section Prizes were announced:

    First Prize: ‘El Verano Del Leon Electrico‘ (The Summer Of The Electric Lion); dir: Diego Céspedes; Universidad de Chile – ICEI, Chile

    Second Prize (tie): ‘Kalendar‘ (Calendar); dir: Igor Poplauhin; Moscow School of New Cinema, Russia
    Dong Wu Xiong Meng‘ (The Storms In Our Blood); dir: Shen Di; Shanghai Theater Academy, China

    Third Prize: ‘Inanimate‘; dir: Lucia Bulgheroni; NFTS, UK

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