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  • AMG
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    The Dead Don’t Die First Reactions

    Robbie Collin: Jim Jarmusch’s The Dead Don’t Die is the best opening night gala I’ve ever seen in Cannes. Which isn’t saying much, but even so! It’s a hoot

    Xan Brooks: “This isn’t going to end well”, or how do you spoil an apocalyptic zombie comedy that shows its hand from the get-go? Jarmusch’s Cannes opener is an amiable, indulgent Trumpian satire. All-star cast having fun; I largely did too

    Alex Billington: Deadpan, slow burn, zombie irony with a seriously nihilistic bite. Jarmusch gets a little too high on social commentary and seems to forget about making something entertaining. At least there’s some cool kills.

    AA Dowd: Jim Jarmusch’s meta horror-comedy THE DEAD DON’T DIE is a big comedown from the laidback profundity of PATERSON. Self-consciously riffs on self-conscious riffing. Could count on one severed hand how many times I laughed.

    Beatrice Behn: TheDeadDontDie or How even Jim Jarmusch and Co. go all ¯_(ツ)_/¯ in regards to Trump’s America. Zombie fun, meta gags but in the end not even Bill Murray can save us.

    David Ehrlich: THE DEAD DON’T DIE is kinda lifeless, as Jim Jarmusch takes a laid-back, (un)deadpan look at our zombified modern world. more brains than bite, but Tilda Swinton also decapitates a lot of people, so that works.

    Eric Kohn: It’s uneven, but I could bask in the kookiness of THE DEAD DON’T DIE all day: Zombies muttering “WiFi” and “Xanax,” a Samurai Swinton, racist Steve Buscemi with a dog named Rumsfeld, a fourth-wall-breaking Adam Driver, etc. Bonus points for a bloody Larry Fessenden!

    FilmLand Empire: THE DEAD DON’T DIE: a loving tribute to old school B-movies that perfectly blends in small town genre Americana with Jim Jarmusch’s usual indie, deadpan style. I adored it

    Jamie Graham: Jarmuch’s deadpan zombie movie The Dead Don’t Die is a lot of fun. Far too self-aware to contain a shred of real human emotion, and the social commentary is laid on as thick as the grue, but it had me chuckling throughout, and the formal precision is [hand ok emoji]

    Jason Gorber: THE DEAD DON’T DIE – Jim Jarmusch channels Romero’s morbid tropes to middling results. It’s a jet black, self-aware comedy that never strikes its proper balance, feeling more a drawling twangy tune than a symphony of undead goodness that lands DOA

    Total Film: Jim Jarmusch’s all-star zom-com is an entertaining-to-a-point showcase for Adam Driver’s formidable comic chops, and a sincere love letter to Romero. But digs at Trump-era America don’t amount to much, and the self-aware gags go too far

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    AMG
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    Schedule for In Competition films:

    Weds 15th: Les Miserables
    Weds 15th: Bacurau
    Thurs 16th: Atlantique
    Thurs 16th: Sorry We Missed You
    Fri 17th: Little Joe
    Fri 17th: Pain & Glory
    Sat 18th: The Wild Goose Lake
    Sat 18th: The Whistlers
    Sun 19th: Portrait of a Lady on Fire
    Sun 19th: A Hidden Life
    Mon 20th: Young Ahmed
    Mon 20th: Frankie
    Tues 21st: Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood
    Tues 21st: Parasite
    Weds 22nd: Matthias & Maxime
    Weds 22nd: Oh Mercy!
    Thurs 23rd: The Traitor
    Thurs 23rd: Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo
    Fri 24th: It Must Be Heaven
    Fri 24th: Sibyl

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    FreemanGriffin
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    I am hoping for great reviews and a great performance from Queen Isabelle in Frankie!!! (:

    Just so happy there are so many French language films in competition this year! (:

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    AMG
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    Les Miserables First Reactions

    Gregory Ellwood: Les Miserables for the most part lacks an authenticity in style and tone. It gets somewhere slightly interesting at the bitter end but so much of it is weak. Felt like watching a CBS procedural at times

    Guy Lodge: There’s bristling anger and energy in Competition wildcard Ladj Ly’s urban thriller LES MISERABLES, but I was surprised to find it so dominated by the cops’ POV. Still, an auspicious fiction debut, and easily the best film named LES MISERABLES this decade.

    Alex Billington: A supremely tense, remarkably fresh, masterful feature debut from Ladj Ly. This film fucking rules. A modern look at relationships between cops and community and different generations. Don’t fuck with the kids. The finale is one for the ages. Bravo

    AA Dowd: Uncomfortable with the ambiguous politics of DRAGGED ACROSS CONCRETE? The Hugo-quoting LES MISERABLES leaves no doubt as to where it lands on cops cracking heads. Enjoyed the film’s one-day-in-David-Ayer-hell energy, but this is drama as baton

    Heather McIntosh: Les Misérables is an incredibly tense thriller by Ladj Ly. It focuses on corrupt police and the havoc they wreak on the communities they harass. A really impressive debut feature

    Nadia Neophytou: Ladj Ly’s Les Misérables is one of those films that will be swirling around my mind for the rest of my Cannes. Ly’s debut is a gut-punch but in all the right ways, as it explores police brutality & social misery in the tough suburb of Montfermeil.

    Magdalena Miedl: ok regarding Ladj Ly’s LES MISÉRABLES, this is a mélange of GOMORRHA, POLISSE, but oddly unspecific – begins as social realist comedy of sorts, ends as a war picture. A bit at loss what to make of it.

    Tim Grierson: While I appreciated the anger and Ladj Ly’s skill with action sequences, this bitter, earnest portrait of simmering racial tension in Paris is such a blunt instrument that I found it manipulative and heavy-handed

    Jason Gorber: Ladj Ly transmogrifies Hugo’s tale of repression and revolution on its head, casting dark, nihilistic gaze on modern France and conflicts between the poor, the police and the politician. Occasionally over broad, nonetheless has moments of excellence

    Arash Azizi: a poignant cop drama which deserves credit for not falling into “good cop, bad cop” dynamics or fetishism of the order so common in American films.

    Jordan Cronk: This movie will win an award and I mean that in the worst way.

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    AMG
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    Bacurau First Reactions

    AA Dowd: BACURAU is wild shit. I would not have guessed that dude who made NEIGHBORING SOUNDS would turn around and (co)direct a movie that reminds me of John Carpenter, Wes Craven, and FIRST BLOOD. But this is where we are, and I’m glad we got here

    David Ehrlich: The director of Aquarius returns with a psychedelic Brazilian Western that’s part Seven Samurai, part Hostel, and maybe even part Udo Kier fighting ghosts with a sniper rifle. it obviously rules.

    Robbie Collin: Lots of bang for your buck in Bacurau: a fine-grained nostalgic Brazilian community portrait *and* blood-curdling parable of contemporary channer psychopathy. Wild swerve for Mendonça that feels like a totally natural progression in retrospect. Liked it

    Emma Stefansky: BACURAU is totally perplexing. there were bits I thought were too much, bits I thought were just awful, and yet more bits I genuinely loved. magical realism morphs into a weird video game-y futuristic fantasy. no idea how I’d write about it

    Alex Billington: What a peculiar film. A mash up of Brazilian culture, political criticism, village mythology, dystopian sci-fi, and a bunch of other ideas sprinkled in. I enjoyed some parts of it, but not all of it. Attempts to cover so much territory, but never solidifies

    Guy Lodge: BACURAU’s a much more complex, conflicted beast that I’m still sorting out, but its ideas and metaphors are a long way from the crystalline geometry of NEIGHBOURING SOUNDS and AQUARIUS: good, nervy scenes bump up against clunky, hollow ones, and not all the genre allusions click

    Anne Thompson: Bacurau is a satisfying, explosive Peckinpah western set in lawless Brazil as an abandoned town protects itself from an unexpected threat. Sonia Braga leads a great local cast while Udo Kier is the best of the weaker crew, the English-speaking outsiders

    Mani Lazic: Not sold on BACURAU, K M Filho & J Dornelles’s mad hyperviolent & poetic film (satire?) abt a small Brazilian community protecting itself. An unpleasant watch for me, but maybe was meant to be funny? The film can’t decide between realism & abstraction at key moments

    Xan Brooks: Firmly in the prop camp on Bacurau; the late-night screening crawled into my dreams. Fevered, twisted human safari; a kind of pith-helmeted Luis Bunuel tale starring a taxidermied Donald Trump Jr. Savage & strange & rather wonderful too

    Tom Page: BACURAU is full of subtle textures in its depiction of rural Brazil, rubbing up against coarsely-written Western infiltrators. An intentional clash of art house and blockbuster aligning with its allegory of imperialism and resource consumption

    Richard Lawson: Bacurau? More like BacuWOW! Love walking into a movie having no idea what it’s about and being so happily, unnervingly surprised. Tarantino better watch out

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    AMG
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    DIRECTOR’S FORTNIGHT FILM
    And Then We Danced First Reactions

    Ella Kemp: Thrilled to announce the resounding truth that AND THEN WE DANCED is the golden spiritual sibling of CALL ME BY YOUR NAME. The line “You’re too soft” within the first five minutes effortlessly teases the familiar world to fall in love with all over again

    Iana Murray: AND THEN WE DANCED: beautiful and tender – unsaid words are expressed in movement and love is corporeal. i’m floored, i love this movie so much

    Kyle Buchanan: AND THEN WE DANCED is basically GOD’S OWN COUNTRY with dance scenes, or CALL ME BY YOUR NAME with Robyn instead of “Love My Way”

    Wendy Ide: Really loved AND THEN WE DANCED – familiar narrative but so elegantly realised.

    Gregory Ellwood: And Then We Danced covers very familiar gay first love story but tries to wrap it up in themes of Georgia’s (the nation) conservative views. The leads are fantastic but it isn’t as distinctive as it strives to be

    Lisa Nessellson: An instantly engaging tale of a young male dancer’s sexual awakening in contemporary Tbilisi, And Then We Danced is personal and political, romantic and educational

    Richard Lawson: Anyway, the movie is AND THEN WE DANCED, a pretty familiar gay coming-of-age story, though set against an interesting backdrop (traditional Georgian dance in Tbilisi) and beautifully shot. The lead is great too—like Jamie Bell and Timothée Chalamet combined

    Alexander Dunerfors: “And Then We Danced” is an absolutely delightful gay drama. Plenty of heart and emotion. Wonderful new actors. It all comes alive with beautiful choreography and an almost effortless direction. Bravo

    Niels Putman: Strong when it turns towards the physical liberation of its inherent queerness; use of body language/dance is tender, smart. Little less strong in its use of familiar gay tropes — echoes BILLY ELLIOT’s climax. Great, charismatic lead.

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    Atlantique First Reactions

    Gregory Ellwood: ATLANTIQUE is compelling watch even when it loses itself for a bit

    Another Gaze: We are STUNNED by Mati Diop’s ATLANTIQUE, a beautifully crafted love story that manages to be a crime mystery, a magic realist tale, and a paean to the youth of Senegal all at once

    Niels Putman: The supernatural crawls its way into the natural in Mati Diop’s magic realist, sociocritical love story/slowburn crime drama ATLANTIQUE. Nuance is its strongest suit. Stunning final shot/scene

    Alex Billington: Mysterious, stylish, compelling African refugee parable about a woman finding herself while caught up in the loss of her love. Some eye rolling moments, the film thinks it’s more clever than it really is. But it has some intriguing ideas it plays with.

    Ella Kemp: ATLANTIQUE feels like a ghost story, a love story, a revolt and an elegy all at once. Some big ideas slip away, but the mystery remains pretty hypnotic still. Excited for Diop’s long long career to come

    Anna Smith: The Cannes premiere of ATLANTIQUE was special: not just the first Palme d’Or contender from a black female director but a fascinating, genre-blending film. It creeps up on you in many ways, all of them good.

    Jonathan Romney: starts resembling African Loach, turns star-crossed love story, then detective drama… then the djinns come in. Mesmerisingly strange. Loved the music… and those swirling disco lasers. Du cinéma quoi.

    Adam Woodward: Mati Diop’s Atlantique is a striking, oblique tale of oppressive relations and otherworldly liaisons. Love the mood and score but characterisation sometimes a bit thin

    Katherine McLaughlin: Atlantique is fantastic! An eerie and melancholic horror packed full of raw emotion. An exciting debut from Mati Diop

    Xan Brooks: Swept away by Mati Diop’s Atlantique at Cannes. A luxuriant death-haunted Valentine of a film from the coast of Senegal. Itinerant workers, star-crossed lovers, white-eyed ghosts

    Jordan Farley: Mati Diop’s bewitching Senagalese mystery about young men who go missing off the Dakar coast, and the ghosts they leave behind. Best to go in as blind as possible. A beautifully shot, exquisitely scored slow burn

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    Sorry We Missed You First Reactions

    Emma Stefansky: SORRY WE MISSED YOU is crushing, depressing, exhausting. takes a hopeless situation and makes it worse by the minute. there’s no telling when it’ll getcha, but it will

    AA Dowd: Capitalism will crush you, your family, your hopes, your dreams to dust. Even by Loach’s standards, a sledgehammer of misfortune. Affecting in spots, but Jesus

    Donald Clarke: Loach’s SORRY WE MISSED YOU is excellent (if you’re on board with the aesthetic). A rigorously researched dissection of the gig economy. Adult performances strong. Kids off-the-chart superb

    Charles Bramesco: Papa Loach overplays his hand a couple times but Jesus fucking Christ this gutted me

    Alex Billington: Another quaint (or not) Ken Loach film about how shit life can be. This time it’s a family drama about how materialism has degraded society forcing us to be slaves for money. A fine anti-capitalism film from Loach

    Rory O’Connor: A companion piece to Daniel Blake that improves on its Palme winning predecessor, swapping benefit bureaucracy for the nightmare of zero-hour contracts. Unflinching, heartbreaking, still full of life. Loach’s strongest in years.

    Ella Kemp: SORRY WE MISSED YOU hits real hard. A deeply sad and true portrait of life consumed by labour, played with affective rawness. It’s led by a major new name to remember: Kris Hitchen is absolutely heartbreaking

    Tom Page: SORRY WE MISSED YOU is Ken Loach at his most Loachian. It’s almost Miller-esque (“Death of a Postman”?) in its depiction of the devaluation of honest toil. I think — I hope — it will provoke a staunch debate about the degrading consequences of the gig economy. Crushing.

    Jason Gorber: Ken Loach stirs up another of his class dramas this time with home care and delivery fans at center stage. All in keeping with his travails of working class shtick – Fans will like, but don’t expect new converts to his mode of somber storytelling

    Luke Hicks: absolutely crushes you with it’s impossible, realist, post-capitalist maze, which cages its desperate focal family. found myself hoping for death by car crash so someone might experience relief. it’s a weepy one. loach has always been good at that

    Xan Brooks: Sorry We Missed You is powerhouse late period Loach. The right man for these wrong times; needed now more than ever

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    AMG
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    OUT OF COMPETITION
    Rocketman First Reactions

    Rebecca Keegan: Hot damn, Taron Egerton is the real deal. Rocketman
    is a musical about picking yourself up off your ass and Taron delivers the sweat, grit and vulnerability it needs.

    Anne Thompson: Dexter Fletcher’s sexy dramatic and poignant Rocketman is an ambitious full-on bio musical with 20 songs—This Is Your Song got applause— sung by star Taron Egerton in a breakout performance. Watch for it to follow boffo global box office with a run on a roadway!

    Gregory Ellwood: Rocketman made me cry. Doesn’t quite stick the landing at the very very end but Taron Egerton is spectacular. Oh and for those doubting Rocketman is very very very gay

    Jamie Graham: Enjoyed Rocketman. Less censored than Bohemian Rhapsody and packed wall-to-wall with Elton’s bangers. A pretty straight-forward music biopic (whatever the filmmakers claim) but enough momentum and surreal flourishes to propel it breathlessly forward

    Stuart Oldham: “Rocketman” is fantastic, a musical drama that hits all the right notes, especially the sad ones

    Kyle Buchanan: Pleasantly surprised that ROCKETMAN does not skimp on the gay sex, but the gayest thing about the movie is still Taron Edgerton insisting he’s fat when he isn’t

    Eric Kohn: If you were wondering what a great Elton John biopic looks like, don’t hold your breath. But at least ROCKETMAN doesn’t skimp on the music

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    Little Joe First Reactions

    Antonio M Abate: I guess LITTLE JOE is that kind of sci-fi too easy to dismiss. Hausner essentially works with just one idea and one only, with no visual trickery whatsoever. Maybe there’s also not that much beneath the surface, but it doesn’t leave without traces.

    Charles Bramesco: Haneke’s LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. This is why I come to Cannes, for out-of-the-blue bolts of brilliance like this. Mint lab coats, high-frequency nightmare score, slow zooms, wry aestheticized horror — so much to love here

    Wendy Ide: Jessica Hausner’s LITTLE JOE will be divisive I suspect. But I rather liked its synthetic oddness

    David Ehrlich: Jessica Hausner is a brilliant director but I *really* struggled with how this arthouse riff on Invasion of the Body Snatchers (or The Happening) conflates anti-depressants with an alien invasion

    Emma Stefansky: LITTLE JOE is a weird plant movie made even more insidious by its subtle, insignificant consequences. what does it matter if something changes you, if no one can tell?? I love that creepy shit!! gimme that creepy shit

    Alex Billington: A crafty, low budget, artsy kind of The Thing-meets-Little Shop of Horrors fairytale. The filmmaking is a bit stilted and way too slow but I love the idea behind this film and the cleverness of how they brought it to life. Destined to be a cult classic

    Jessica Kiang: Considering my Hausner affinity, not to mention #JessicaSolidarity, it’s a surprisingly big no for LITTLE JOE from me. Love the pastel block-colour scheme though.

    Luke Hicks: gorgeous cinematography & production design. mint greens, sky blues, and corals mixed with sharper neon violets, reds, and greens. the premise falls flat after hovering over the climax for so long, which ends up being banal. but hausner is onto something great

    Patrick Heidman: Visually, LITTLE JOE is astonishing. Jessica Hausner composes images & colors like no one else. And the sound/score is really something…

    Donald Clarke: I have already had several fights about Jessica Hausner’s LITTLE JOE, which I loved and others didn’t. I regard that as a good thing

    Adam Woodward: Jessica Hausner’s Little Joe is bloomin’ marvellous

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    Pain & Glory First Reactions

    Dave Karger: It won’t be for everyone but I absolutely loved Pedro Almodóvar’s Pain and Glory. It’s sweet, sad, and at times off-the-charts sexy. Spain would be smart to select it as its Oscar entry and I’d love to see a Best Actor campaign for the never better Antonio Banderas

    Richard Lawson: The more I think about the new Almodóvar, PAIN AND GLORY, the more I love it. It’s such a disarmingly calm and contemplative look at how, as we age, all the lusts of our youths start to seem not silly, but rather special and lovely—and just shy of irretrievable. Sigh

    Gregory Ellwood: Almodovar’s Pain and Glory is definitely a slow burn. Second half is pretty compelling though. Antonio Banderas is very good, potential Best Actor play but that’s a BIG maybe.

    Eric Kohn: So many filmmakers resort to movies about being successful tortured artists and the results can be excruciating. But not Pedro Almodóvar. PAIN AND GLORY is his best in years, and Banderas’ performance follows suit.

    Yasmin Omar: Pain and Glory is far from my favourite Almodóvar, it’s rather subdued and thoughtful where others are loud and garish. An oversight that bugged me: the actress who plays elderly Penélope Cruz has blue eyes but hers are brown

    David Jenkins: Need to rewatch Talk To Her first to check, but think Pain & Glory may be Almodóvar’s masterpiece. A gorgeous, wisful, contemplative, unselfconsciously tricksy, nakedly honest melodrama, every frame exudes supreme confidence.

    Xan Brooks: Adored Pain & Glory btw. A graceful swan-dive through the past, perfectly played by a careworn Banderas. Feels like Almodovar’s saddest, warmest & most personal film

    Alex Billington: Almodovar’s autobiographical film is not as fanciful as his other recent work, more intimate and emotionally driven. I appreciate his openness and the simplicity of the storytelling, it’s very personal filmmaking, just didn’t connect with me at all

    Eugene Hernandez: Almodóvar is my fav film artist, his cinema deeply meaningful to me. PAIN & GLORY is prob one of his greatest works but it will take me time & repeat viewings to explain why.

    Cedric Succivalli: I am watching PAIN AND GLORY for the…third time tonight, I would NOT miss Pedro’s Gala for the world. After a month or so, I still consider this one to his Magnus Opus.

    Kyle Buchanan: The new Almodóvar is so, so lovely

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    UN CERTAIN REGARD FILM
    The Climb First Reactions

    Guy Lodge: I was charmed and rather moved by Michael Angelo Covino’s clever, tender debut feature THE CLIMB, which moves beyond Hangover-era laddishness to treat bromance as, well, romance.

    Anne Thompson: Un Certain Regard breakout The Climb reminds me of Wild Tales, with its raunchy unexpected character-driven comedy vignettes, and a bit of the Duplass brothers, with its co-writer costars (Michael Covino also makes his directing debut). It also feels like a Netflix movie

    Alex Billington: A wacky comedy about friendship, and love, and family, and life. Seven vignettes play out over years showing the ups and downs and obnoxiousness of life – focused on friends Kyle & Mike. Not at all what I expected but still amusing.

    Eric Kohn: THE CLIMB is by far one of the best movies I’ve seen at Cannes 2019
    — a hilarious testosterone-fueled buddy movie that reinvents the genre with acrobatic filmmaking to spare. If studio comedies were this well-directed, cinema would thrive

    Alissa Wilkinson: may I say that if you can see THE CLIMB you absolutely should

    Ryland Aldrich: THE CLIMB is a fantastic exploration of the heartache of true friendship. With his captivating filmmaking style and hilariously biting dialog, Michael Covino is about to burst into the hearts of both American and international indie film fans

    Jack King: feels way, way more Director’s Fortnight than Un Certain Regard? It’s funny, don’t get me wrong — not a terrible amount of depth but it’s held up by some terrific camera work and lead performances. Can see potential for La Camera d’Or.

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    The Wild Goose Lake First Reactions

    David Ehrlich: THE WILD GOOSE LAKE is a minor letdown after the genius of Black Coal, Thin Ice, but this ravishingly bleak Chinese noir confirms that Diao Yinan is a major director.

    Richard Lawson: THE WILD GOOSE LAKE features a harrowing death by umbrella and a gnarlier version of the twine trick from THE COUNSELOR. Fun!

    Emma Stefansky: there are two umbrella moments in the stunning WILD GOOSE LAKE that made me gasp, and the reasons for both could not be more different

    Charles Bramesco: just how in the tank am I for Diao’s superlative ride-or-die crime epic? One moment made me reflexively blurt out “AWESOME”

    Xan Brooks: Tarantino rocked up to the screening of The Wild Goose Lake & of course he’d be on for this. A rain, blood & neon-soaked Motorcycle Thieves abt a fugitive, his girl, & the cops & crims in pursuit. Super-stylish, almost to a fault

    Tim Grierson: A supremely confident crime-thriller: pitiless, churning, slightly opaque. Yinan Diao makes great use of rain, shadows, motorcycles, neon, nighttime. If it doesn’t add up to all that much, it’s nonetheless a pretty dazzling flexing of style.

    Luke Hicks: Diao is so damn good at the modern neo-noir crime thriller hunt. this one doesn’t disappoint. didn’t blow me away, but it’s very impressive, & the story and imagery are intriguing enough to make it a good watch. BLACK COAL, THIN ICE reigns supreme

    Iana Murray: a sleek and stylish crime epic that QT probably loved. the way diao yinan shoots action is so dynamic in a way that every gunshot and punch reverberates

    AA Dowd: The plot is slightly confusing boilerplate, but Yi’nan Diao’s THE WILD GOOSE LAKE has some of the most spectacular pure filmmaking of Cannes. Loved the associative editing and the abstracted action. Touches of Hitchcock, even.

    Andy Moore: THE WILD GOOSE LAKE didn’t quite grab me in the same way as BLACK COAL, THIN ICE did, but it’s an undeniably stylish and distinctive crime drama with some extraordinary set pieces. Plus I’m gonna have Boney M’s Rasputin in my head all day now.

    Peter Howell: Man on the run, poetry in motion. Diao Yinan’s kinetic noir of a gangster on the lam and the woman sent to find him bypasses the cerebral cortex and delights the eye, with expertly staged chase and fight scenes and a propulsive sense of mystery.

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    The Whistlers First Reactions

    Tim Grierson: Unless there’s one I’m missing, this is the first film of the Romanian New Wave you could describe as being an absolute blast. Corneliu Porumboiu crafts a sharp, sexy thriller drunk on old Hollywood and airport page-turners. Also, it’s really funny

    Eric Kohn: THE WHISTLERS is light and fun, but with ideas to spare, moving further along in the direction Corneliu Porumboiu started taking with THE TREASURE

    Alex Billington: Ahahahaha this double crossing heist comedy is pretty much Romanian Hitchcock and it’s the best. Excellence. Inventive & entertaining, full of fun characters, superb music. And a whistling language! Porumboiu is a genius, we just live in his world now.

    Heather McIntosh: Really enjoyed Cornuliu Porumboiu’s La Gomera (The Whistlers). A thriller in which both the film’s characters & the audience never know who they can trust. It’s stylishness reminded me of Consequences of Love

    Antonio M Abate: With THE WHISTLERS Porumboiu keeps establishing himself as one of the most clever and funny directors out there. His last effort is a witty comedy noir which echoes Hitchcock (and Melville and others) in a sophisticated yet accessible way.

    Jamie Graham: Cornelius Poremboiu’s The Whistlers is one of my favourites so far. A twisty heist movie with humour dark and deadpan

    Charles Bramesco: as my father would say, “pipe down with all that farfing!” (It’s funny! But not quite top-tier-Porumboiu-movie-funny. Lotta slack.)

    Natasha Wilkinson: Great to go out on a high. My last film of the fest was Corneliu Porumboiu’s La Gomera , a stylish, knotty crime tale with a wry sense of humour.

    Phil de Semlyen: The Whistlers is a wild rumpus of Hitchcockian thriller and I enjoyed the absolute heck out of it. Douze points for Romania

    Damon Wise: The Whistlers is my favourite film of the festival so far, a fantastic, fresh thrill ride with substance and style

    Mikko Pihkoluoma: The Whistlers ends with a beautiful Kubrick reference and makes a hilarious Hitchcock gag as well. Loved it

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    AMG
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    DIRECTOR’S FORTNIGHT FILM
    The Lighthouse First Reactions

    Ella Kemp: Every frame of THE LIGHTHOUSE is stunning, every flinch of this wonderfully weird horror is insane in the best way. Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe are completely unparalleled, how exciting it is to be living at the same time as such talent!

    AA Dowd: Dug it. Works better as lunatic comedy–and a showcase for Dafoe and Pattinson–than it does as horror. Lots of opportunity for Eggers to indulge his taste for stylishly archaic dialogue

    Gus Edgar: THE LIGHTHOUSE: Eggers takes on masculinity, madness and merfolk, and it’s marvellous. Don’t think I’ve seen a better Dafoe performance.

    Alex Billington: Two men on a rock in the ocean slowly go mad. Absolutely phenomenal, visceral, intense, hilarious filmmaking. Every shot is masterful. Score is astounding. Willem Dafoe & Robert Pattinson are incredible, plumbing the depths of insanity. Perfection

    Jamie Graham: Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse surpasses The Witch. An astonishing descent into madness… or ascent into the light.

    Gregory Ellwood: Robert Eggers The Lighthouse is a two-fer character study featuring fantastic performances by Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson. Might be Pattinson’s best

    Robbie Collin: Laughing with amazement at the end of The Lighthouse. Cinema!

    Peter Bradshaw: Robert Eggers’s gripping nightmare The Lighthouse is the best thing in Cannes with sledgehammer performances from Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson, like Steptoe and Son in hell

    Emma Stefansky: THE LIGHTHOUSE rips: it’s terrifying, hilarious, nightmarish, and Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe shamble around in flannels and longjohns the whole time, yelling stuff like “GET TO WORK, SAYS I!!” “BARK YOU DOG!!” don’t let anyone spoil this for you

    Charles Bramesco: THE LIGHTHOUSE, or FART TO BE A GOD: to specify would rob the moment of its power, so suffice it to say that this film contains a vulva shot unlike any other. (Also, this would’ve slayed pretty much everything in Competiton I’ve seen so far.)

    Xan Brooks: Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse is an uproarious, hallucinatory dark-&-stormy night yarn. Joyously rolling with the cliches & performed with drunken abandon by Pattinson & Dafoe. Just fabulous, this

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