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    AMG
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    #1204956465

    God’s Creatures First Reactions (Director’s Fortnight)

    Karl Delossantos: A24’s God’s Creatures is an intimate Irish drama set in a small seaside town. It has interesting ideas questioning the country’s cultural values and the melancholic atmosphere keeps you engaged. In the end it’s a bit too slight. Paul Mescal and Emily Watson are great.

    The Oscar Expert: Emily Watson is fantastic in God’s Creatures, a film that becomes more haunting and intricate as it goes along. Paul Mescal and Aisling Franciosi are really strong too. Really left an impression on me!

    Tim Grierson: After the distinctive tone of THE FITS, this muted character study feels a bit underwhelming, although the chance to watch Emma Watson quietly fret has its rewards

    Gregory Ellwood: Emily Watson and Paul Mescal are as good as you’d expect in God’s Creatures. An Irish seaside drama that feels overly familiar.

    Peter Bradshaw: Emily Watson and Paul Mescal shine in doom-laden drama. This is a movie which has some dramatic redundancy and is sometimes submerged too deeply in its own sense of tragic destiny.

    David Rooney: The long-awaited followup of THE FITS collaborators Saela Davis & Anna Rose Holmer, GOD’S CREATURES is slow to build but delivers considerable final-act payoff in Emily Watson’s wrenching performance.

    Stephanie Bunbury: Two stellar performances anchor God’s Creatures, giving both body and soul to a story that could feel thinly predictable in lesser hands.

    Francesc Vilallonga: Attention to this very powerful Irish film produced by A24 . An underground drama set in a small fishing community, a denunciation of patriarchy, which has a colossal performance from Emily Watson. Very good.

    Matthieu Touvet: we finally find the immense Emily Watson in a role worthy of her. In this drama in the middle of a fishing community, she excels as a mother confronted with the unacceptable. Everything is very tight, sensitive and subtle.

    Total Film: Secrets, lies and fish guts make for a compelling brew in God’s Creatures. Emily Watson and Paul Mescal are ace as a mother and son caught in a web of lies, loyalties and oyster beds in this tense A24 drama

    Fionnuala Halligan: Emily Watson puts in a commanding performance in this rural Irish mother-son drama. Occasionally, it tips over into the overwrought with its toothless, demented, grandfather, muttered novenas, and constant rolling, heavy weather in all senses, but the essence of God’s Creatures is fascinating as we watch the force of women row back against the status quo.

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    Vicki Leekx
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    #1204956639

    Some nice raves for Emily…we love to see it!

    FYC:

    Swinton, Weerasethakul Memoria, (Best Actress, Director)
    Efira, Rampling, Wilson Benedetta (Best Actress, Supporting Actress/Actor)
    Rapace Lamb (Best Actress)
    Stewart, Hawkins, Spall Spencer (Best Actress, Supporting Actress/Actor)

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    alittle03
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    #1204956646

    Thank you AMG for doing this by the way! I believe you also did this last year, if I recall correctly, and it was appreciated then and it’s so appreciated now, as well.

    • FYC: Everything Everywhere All at Once in any and every single category, especially Best Picture, Michelle Yeoh in Actress, Stephanie Hsu in Supporting Actress, The Daniels in Director/Screenplay, Paul Rogers in Editing, and Son Lux in Score.

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    Setia Yasmine Khalil
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    #1204956688

    God’s Creatures First Reactions (Director’s Fortnight) Karl Delossantos: A24’s God’s Creatures is an intimate Irish drama set in a small seaside town. It has interesting ideas questioning the country’s cultural values and the melancholic atmosphere keeps you engaged. In the end it’s a bit too slight. Paul Mescal and Emily Watson are great. The Oscar Expert: Emily Watson is fantastic in God’s Creatures, a film that becomes more haunting and intricate as it goes along. Paul Mescal and Aisling Franciosi are really strong too. Really left an impression on me! Tim Grierson: After the distinctive tone of THE FITS, this muted character study feels a bit underwhelming, although the chance to watch Emma Watson quietly fret has its rewards Gregory Ellwood: Emily Watson and Paul Mescal are as good as you’d expect in God’s Creatures. An Irish seaside drama that feels overly familiar. Peter Bradshaw: Emily Watson and Paul Mescal shine in doom-laden drama. This is a movie which has some dramatic redundancy and is sometimes submerged too deeply in its own sense of tragic destiny. David Rooney: The long-awaited followup of THE FITS collaborators Saela Davis & Anna Rose Holmer, GOD’S CREATURES is slow to build but delivers considerable final-act payoff in Emily Watson’s wrenching performance. Stephanie Bunbury: Two stellar performances anchor God’s Creatures, giving both body and soul to a story that could feel thinly predictable in lesser hands. Francesc Vilallonga: Attention to this very powerful Irish film produced by A24 . An underground drama set in a small fishing community, a denunciation of patriarchy, which has a colossal performance from Emily Watson. Very good. Matthieu Touvet: we finally find the immense Emily Watson in a role worthy of her. In this drama in the middle of a fishing community, she excels as a mother confronted with the unacceptable. Everything is very tight, sensitive and subtle. Total Film: Secrets, lies and fish guts make for a compelling brew in God’s Creatures. Emily Watson and Paul Mescal are ace as a mother and son caught in a web of lies, loyalties and oyster beds in this tense A24 drama Fionnuala Halligan: Emily Watson puts in a commanding performance in this rural Irish mother-son drama. Occasionally, it tips over into the overwrought with its toothless, demented, grandfather, muttered novenas, and constant rolling, heavy weather in all senses, but the essence of God’s Creatures is fascinating as we watch the force of women row back against the status quo.

    Omg this is impressive

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    AMG
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    #1204956943

    Armageddon Time First Reactions

    Jordan Ruimy: James Gray’s most personal film yet is also a poignant treatise on race relations in America. Anthony Hopkins deserves serious awards consideration for his heartfelt performance as the wise, loving and beautifully tolerant grandfather

    Alexander Kardelo: Sorry to say that ARMAGEDDON TIME is an absolute snoozefest. A total waste of a good cast including Anne Hathaway, Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Chastain.

    Karl Delossantos: ARMAGEDDON TIME is the first great movie of the fest. Moments felt plucked from my childhood. An autobiographical drama that doesn’t feel self important and instead just finds the relatable themes in specific memories. Anne Hathaway, Anthony Hopkins and Jaylin Webb shine.

    David Ehrlich: loved James Gray’s ARMAGEDDON TIME, which only sounds like “Belfast for New York Jews” until you actually see it. a muted & melancholy little film that’s sunk into me a bit deeper every day. Anthony Hopkins incredible as my grandpa.

    Ella Kemp: ARMAGEDDON TIME knows it’s funny and maybe sweet but also maybe low key life threatening to be a fragile little Jew, good stuff

    FilmLand Empire: ARMAGEDDON TIME is everything you could have hoped for from a coming of age film by James Gray, the director at the top of his game with this subtle, extremely moving autobiographical story in which he brushes a searing portrayal of America at a key time of history.

    Martyn Conterio: James Gray’s Armageddon Time is a subtle stunner. A coming-of-age tale, a story of duelling life philosophies, a dissection of class, set on the cusp of Ronald Reagan’s presidency and the yuppie era. Anthony Hopkins and Jeremy Strong are both wonderful.

    Amy Smith: ARMAGEDDON TIME is the first major disappointment of the festival. Characters are left with no development, important themes are ditched and only Jeremy Strong is given a role big enough to chew on. This won’t maintain Oscar buzz.

    Sam Adams: ARMAGEDDON TIME is the first great movie I’ve seen at Cannes, a sweet childhood fable that turns increasingly bitter and, with the help of some historical figures, becomes about the monstrous things we do in the name of wanting the best for our kids

    Damian Pietrzak: Armageddon Time is beautiful, sincere and very touching film about race relations and growing up in 80s. It clealry comes straight from Gray heart, he is rare US director that handles emotions with subtetly. Strong, Hopkins and Hathaway all amazing. Instant Oscar con!

    Jason Gorber: James Gray dons his autobiographic appologetic with goishe flair. Save for Hopkins it’s a middling affair, but there’s still enough that ties to likes of BELFAST, ROMA etc to generate attention

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    #1204956950

    Armageddon Time First Reactions Jordan Ruimy: James Gray’s most personal film yet is also a poignant treatise on race relations in America. Anthony Hopkins deserves serious awards consideration for his heartfelt performance as the wise, loving and beautifully tolerant grandfather Alexander Kardelo: Sorry to say that ARMAGEDDON TIME is an absolute snoozefest. A total waste of a good cast including Anne Hathaway, Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Chastain. Karl Delossantos: ARMAGEDDON TIME is the first great movie of the fest. Moments felt plucked from my childhood. An autobiographical drama that doesn’t feel self important and instead just finds the relatable themes in specific memories. Anne Hathaway, Anthony Hopkins and Jaylin Webb shine. David Ehrlich: loved James Gray’s ARMAGEDDON TIME, which only sounds like “Belfast for New York Jews” until you actually see it. a muted & melancholy little film that’s sunk into me a bit deeper every day. Anthony Hopkins incredible as my grandpa. Ella Kemp: ARMAGEDDON TIME knows it’s funny and maybe sweet but also maybe low key life threatening to be a fragile little Jew, good stuff FilmLand Empire: ARMAGEDDON TIME is everything you could have hoped for from a coming of age film by James Gray, the director at the top of his game with this subtle, extremely moving autobiographical story in which he brushes a searing portrayal of America at a key time of history. Martyn Conterio: James Gray’s Armageddon Time is a subtle stunner. A coming-of-age tale, a story of duelling life philosophies, a dissection of class, set on the cusp of Ronald Reagan’s presidency and the yuppie era. Anthony Hopkins and Jeremy Strong are both wonderful. Amy Smith: ARMAGEDDON TIME is the first major disappointment of the festival. Characters are left with no development, important themes are ditched and only Jeremy Strong is given a role big enough to chew on. This won’t maintain Oscar buzz. Sam Adams: ARMAGEDDON TIME is the first great movie I’ve seen at Cannes, a sweet childhood fable that turns increasingly bitter and, with the help of some historical figures, becomes about the monstrous things we do in the name of wanting the best for our kids Damian Pietrzak: Armageddon Time is beautiful, sincere and very touching film about race relations and growing up in 80s. It clealry comes straight from Gray heart, he is rare US director that handles emotions with subtetly. Strong, Hopkins and Hathaway all amazing. Instant Oscar con! Jason Gorber: James Gray dons his autobiographic appologetic with goishe flair. Save for Hopkins it’s a middling affair, but there’s still enough that ties to likes of BELFAST, ROMA etc to generate attention

    Interesting. It seems Strong is The Only Lead and the rest are Supporting

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    TheLordMan
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    #1204956966

    The positive reviews for this confirms no matter the quality of a film, if it’s about race, critics will absolutely adore it. Look at Crash and Green Book.

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    #1204956979

    The positive reviews for this confirms no matter the quality of a film, if it’s about race, critics will absolutely adore it. Look at Crash and Green Book.

    ?. But some critics didn’t like this. Seems the movie is Meh. That’s why they only talk about Strong or Hopkins

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    SoniNon
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    #1204957003

    Sounds minor.

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    Vicki Leekx
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    #1204957058

    Some raves, some pans, seems a polarising response for AT. However supporting actor isn’t often a harbinger of quality so King Hopkins could be coming for that 7th nom…

    FYC:

    Swinton, Weerasethakul Memoria, (Best Actress, Director)
    Efira, Rampling, Wilson Benedetta (Best Actress, Supporting Actress/Actor)
    Rapace Lamb (Best Actress)
    Stewart, Hawkins, Spall Spencer (Best Actress, Supporting Actress/Actor)

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    AMG
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    #1204957146

    EO First Reactions

    Jack Schenker: After a shaky start, this donkey odyssey goes places you would not expect. I was in awe by the audacious structure, cinematography and sound design. This donkey is the Daniel Day-Lewis of donkey’s. it probably wont, but I hope it wins the palme d’Or

    Pascal Gavillet: The world at the height of a donkey. Inspired by Bresson, a surprising story in a dazzling film where all possibilities are embodied. A powerfully poetic allegory signed by an 84-year-old veteran.

    Eric Kohn: Skolimowski’s EO is a grimy AU HASARD BALTHASAR remake with a bonus Isabelle Huppert cameo. It’s quite ridiculous. I liked it!

    Karl Delossantos: EO is about a depressed donkey named Eo who wishes to be a horse and crosses paths with people like a heavy metal meat trafficker, a hot priest, and Isabelle Huppert. I surprisingly really enjoyed this one. Kind of like The Tree of Life by way of donkey.

    Christer Emanuelsson: Nowadays, it’s rare to watch two new utterly cinematic films during one year. To have that experience in one day feels like a miracle. Skolimowski’s EO might actually be closer to Kubrick than Bresson, and it’s made by someone who understands the potential of cinema

    Amy Smith: It didn’t always work for me, but you got to admire the creative choices and bold structure taken with EO. This is one that is going to stick with me for the upcoming days, for good and bad.

    Rafa Sales Ross: It’ll be hard to top up the in-cinema experience provided by Jerzy Skolimowski’s hallucinatory EO, which plays like a Greek tragedy on quaaludes by the way of Terrence Malick. I could’ve watched this donkey’s majestically trippy journey for hours on end.

    Cedric Succivalli: At 84.(!) Skolimowski gives us a vegetarian version of The Tree of Life with Legend Huppert smashing plates, and it was transcendent!

    FilmLand Empire: the plight for survival of a donkey and the various animals it comes across. A sad, surreal, nightmarish, lyrical and comedic story without an ounce of anthropomorphism, quite unlike anything I’ve seen! Isabelle Huppert’s cameo is hilarious

    Tim Grierson: Before a disappointing ending, Jerzy Skolimowski’s kinda/sorta redo of AU HASARD BALTHAZAR is its own vivid, audacious beast, playing with color and sound to create a new way of seeing the world. More nervy experiment than profound statement, but nervy works, too.

    Charles Bramesco: an ass that won’t quit. Just eighty-six minutes of pure vibes, crazed experiments with the color red, and a donkey being a very good boy. I would kill or die for any donkey. I am donkeypilled

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    AMG
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    #1204957634

    One Fine Morning (Director’s Fortnight)

    The Oscar Expert: One Fine Morning is a light meditation on aging and finding love when it feels like it’s past your time. I enjoyed it but it never really took off for me.

    David Ehrlich: in wildly unsurprising news, the new Mia Hansen-Løve movie — a breezy, heartfelt summer’s tale starring Léa Seydoux as a widowed translator who finds new love with a married astrophysicist — is very, very good.

    Jon Frosch: Léa Seydoux gives her best performance in ONE FINE MORNING (UN BEAU MATIN), another understated triumph from Mia Hansen-Løve — her most tender movie yet. On paper it sounds like every French film. MHL is not every French filmmaker.

    Tim Grierson: Like so many of Mia Hansen-Love’s films, this feels so casually stitched together that you assume at some point it’s going to unravel. Except it doesn’t, the accumulation of small details building to something far richer than expected. As always.

    Tomris Laffly: Mia Hansen-Løve is among the greatest filmmakers in the world. ONE FINE MORNING is intimate, graceful & fiercely feminine in telling a story of new love & new beginnings found by a widowed woman. I’d say put Léa Seydoux in everything, but she already is in everything

    Guy Lodge: I didn’t much like Mia Hansen-Løve’s last two films — sorry, BERGMAN ISLAND stans — so I’m delighted to report that she’s back on bittersweet form in ONE FINE MORNING, which also gives Léa Seydoux the best of her million recent starring roles.

    Peter Bradshaw: For all its tendency to soap opera, it has a lovely happy-sad sweetness. Seydoux and Greggory, and between her and Poupaud there is real erotic languor and romance.

    Total Film: Mia Hansen-Løve’s One Fine Morning is a sensitively drawn Parisian drama about losing a father and finding love. Formally unadventurous, but poignant and well performed

    Gregory Ellwood: Lea Seydoux is fantastic in One Fine Mornings but not sure what Mia Hansen Love really wants to say with this one

    Francesc Vilallonga: The French director continues in full form with this delicious Parisian chronicle about love, lovelessness and the end of life. Its naturalness and lightness are only apparent. Everything flows. Lea Seydoux, 10.

    Anna Bogutskaya: UN BEAU MATIN is a sweet balm of a film, maybe my favorite Mia Hansen-Løve yet. Patient, tender performance by Léa Seydoux. Everything is small – gestures, looks,tragedies,loves,apartments – but never feels inconsequential.

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    AMG
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    #1204957659

    Hunt First Reactions (Midnight Screenings)

    David Rooney: The directing debut of ‘Squid Game’ star Lee Jung-jae, HUNT, has some blowout action set-pieces but shows less confidence in the basics of character and plot development.

    Rafael Motamayor: Hunt is WILD! Lee Jung-jae makes a terrific directorial debut with a spy thriller that has as many plot twists as it has bullets. Don’t even think about going to the bathroom during this one or you’ll be lost. This will play great at genre festivals.

    Jack Schenker: Lee Jung-Jae is a certified talent. Unfortunately I did not connect with his latest film. The plot confused me and nothing stood out in terms of the cinematography. The sound design made you feel every punch, I just wish it was wilder/weirder

    Karl Delossantos: Squid Game star Lee Jung-jae’s directorial debut HUNT is an ambitious twisting political thriller that works on an action movie level but gets lost in its complex narrative as it unfolds. It might play better for Koreans with more context but it lost me in parts.

    Tim Grierson: The plotting may sometimes be convoluted, but the picture rolls along so forcefully that its familiar genre trappings hardly hamper the proceedings.

    Scott Feinberg: I was very entertained. Could I fully follow every twist? No, but same for Z and TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, which it reminds me of/I still love.

    Peter Debruge: A major international star following his leading role in Netflix’s hit “Squid Game” series, Lee proves surprisingly adept behind the camera, especially when it comes to staging high-intensity shootouts. The cat-and-mouse dynamics of “Hunt” aren’t nearly as satisfying as its action set-pieces, which Lee and his team pull off with considerable skill.

    David Ehrlich: An energetic yet hopelessly convoluted espionage thriller that doesn’t tell a story so much as it chronically bumps into one, Hunt begins with a premise so primed for spy-vs-spy mind games that you can almost hear John le Carré licking his lips from beyond the grave.

    Pete Hammond: This is the kind of movie plot about the less said the better, but fortunately the focus is on the characters pitted against each other, rather than the countries themselves and that is crucial to making this time bomb of a movie keep ticking as well as it does over the course of two+ hours.

    Jean Noh: I can say my mind was blown by the action & twists within twists following twists that we can’t even talk about bc everyone should get to see it without spoilers

    Amy Smith: Lee Jung Jae shows a lot of potential as a director with his debut HUNT, especially with the tension and action sequences. Unfortunately he bites off more than he can chew with this story as there is too much going on and it is hard to follow along with.

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    AMG
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    #1204958303

    Boy From Heaven First Reactions

    Amy Smith: BOY FROM HEAVEN is getting a fantastic reception at the premiere and it’s no wonder why. It tackles the subject matter on head first in a way that is so beautifully handled, simple yet poignant. Make this a must watch this festival.

    Jack Schenker: Tarik Saleh successfully dabbles in numerous genres. Excellent performances all around. The build up was better than the pay off but the last moments were perfect. We are in the midst of a long and deserved ovation.

    Julien Lada: Applied, brilliant but without genius, Boy from Heaven is a solid political thriller on the moral and religious corruption of al-Sissi’s Egypt, which is in line with Cairo Confidential. Not difficult to imagine it ending up somewhere in the awards, though.

    Francesc Vilallonga: A notable thriller-denunciation exercise, the Egyptian director’s film makes a devastating critique of the corruption and power struggles between religion and state in contemporary Egypt. Absorbing and forceful. Pleasant surprise.

    Simon Riaux: BOY FROM HEAVEN is rough, its naturalism gradually lets a rather terrible parable emerge on the appetites of a religious institution where power dissolves the spiritual. One of the most complex and interesting proposals of Cannes so far.

    Damon Wise: It’s early days at the Cannes Film Festival, so awards prognostication might seem a little premature, but still, it’s hard to imagine that the phenomenal performance given by Swedish-Lebanese actor Fares Fares in Tarik Saleh’s searing political thriller Boy From Heaven will go entirely unnoticed by this year’s jury.

    Total Film: an Islamic thought student turns informant for the state in Tarik Saleh’s superb Egyptian Donnie Brasco. The genre trappings are familiar – corruption lurks round every corner, danger behind every door – but this is fearlessly anti-establishment work

    Juan Luis Caviaro: That wonderful feeling of watching a great movie. Goosebumps in its final stretch, when the tension is released until a tear sprouts. ‘Boy from Heaven’, the new Tarik Saleh, is an impressive thriller about corruption, political and human.

    Jordan Mintzer: A compelling if somewhat conventional thriller in a highly unconventional setting. It’s a familiar template, and Saleh’s direction can veer toward the heavy-handed in places, but it’s also an intriguingly damning portrait of the corruption currently hitting Egypt on all levels.

    Nicholas Bell: Saleh continues to explore his intrigue with compromised institutions and the nefarious intentions of authority, but his latest eventually fizzles beneath the weight of too many convenient twists.

    Peter Bradshaw: Egypt’s religious and secular institutions both breed mistrust in Tarik Saleh’s superbly realised paranoid nightmare. There’s an intriguing mix of scorn and paranoia here, together with a yearning for individual figures of decency halfway down the food chain – it reminded me of John le Carré.

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    AMG
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    #1204958414

    Three Thousand Years of Longing First Reactions (Out of Competition)

    Michal Wasilewski: Three Thousand Years of Longing captures the magical essence of cinema, inviting its audience on an otherworldly journey. Although I wish it explored its themes in a deeper and more universal way, it’s certainly a film like no other.

    Anne Thompson: George Miller’s Three Thousand Years of Longing is unlike anything you’ve ever experienced. It’s a gorgeously wrought epic fairy tale romance between a djinn (Idris Elba) and an academic (Tilda Swinton) who studies storytelling. He tells her a bang of a tale; she makes wishes.

    Jason Osiason: THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING: What starts off about two desperately lonely souls that find each other under the strangest circumstances despite being millenniums apart, develops into one of of the most panty-melting passionate and intimate romances I’ve ever seen

    Clayton Davis: Three Thousand Years of Longing is a love story to the storytellers. George Miller’s magnum opus. People will say it’s his THE SHAPE OF WATER, but it’s his TREE OF LIFE. A reflection on our own existence and yearn to be loved. Tilda Swinton and Idris Elba soar to the heavens

    Richard Lawson: George Miller’s THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING is strange and erratic and deeply earnest. And it mostly works.

    Jordan Farley: George Miller combines myth, magic, and romance to mixed effect in a visually dazzling Three Thousand Years Of Longing – the kind of playful adult fairytale that’s all but extinct in the era of franchise filmmaking

    Joe Utichi: George Miller’s Three Thousand Years of Longing beguiled me. A sweeping, beautiful and enigmatic work of mastery from one of cinema’s greats.

    Jack Schenker: George Millers long awaited return to the big screen is a head scratcher. Amazing set design, costume design and performances but something about it felt off. I really liked it just did not match my expectations. Rewatch required

    Alexandre Janowiak: George Miller celebrates the power of storytelling and imagination with Three Thousand Years of Longing! A crazy metaphysical journey between the magical fresco and the intimate camera. A humanist, poetic and soothing walk that you would never like to see end.

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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