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Cannes Film Festival 2022

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    CarlosEdu
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    #1204961973

    Decision To Leave has 3.2 in jury grid of Screen International, the biggest rating for the movies in official competition.

    Crimes of the Future has 2.5.

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    Rachel615
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    #1204961991

    Tang Wei also might win best actress she is having great notices

    The film can’t win both Best Director and Best Actress. No film can receive more than one award. (However, the award for the Best Screenplay and the Jury Prize can be combined with a Best Performance award, on special dispensation of the Festival’s President.)  Nothing is a certainty but I’ll be surprised if it doesn’t receive one of the two, especially since several other touted films haven’t received the reviews that were hoped for or expected.

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    AMG
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    #1204962350

    Tori & Lokita First Reactions

    Amy Smith: The Dardenne’s have delivered as TORI AND LOKITA is a powerful drama with two exceptional leading performances. The short runtime keeps the story in focus and with every reveal your heart breaks more for these characters.

    David Ehrlich: TORI AND LOKITA might be the angriest movie the Dardennes have made. takes “not mincing their words” to new degrees of words unminced. bracing, potent, doing its best to shame the world forward even if it’ll never be good enough.

    Phil de Semlyen: Tori and Lokita is as close as the Dardenne brothers have come to making a straight-up thriller. An urgent, angry and emotional slant on experience of two young African migrants in a criminal underworld. Utterly gripping

    David Jenkins: Tori and Lokita sees the Dardennes back to full power with a film which perhaps most overtly displays their roots in neorealism. Tough, angry, sensitively-wrought drama with an action sequence to rival the moped scene in The Child.

    David Cuevas: The brothers are back, with yet another soul shattering look at adolescence. A brutal albeit occasionally meandering portrait; illuminates systematic frailty and failure towards immigrant youth with great humanist strokes

    Total Film: the inevitable Dardenne take on the immigration crisis is a typically empathetic, bluntly moralistic story of a brother and sister who fall in with drug dealers. Odd diversions into genre territory (heists! mob hits!) undercut the verisimilitude

    Jack Schenker: Chills have been sent down my spine. One of the most stressful and fucked up dramas I have seen. I am still processing what I saw. All I can say is if you can handle it do not miss it. This crowd is buzzing. Special

    Fabien Lemercier: The Dardenne brothers back in top form. Everything is under control, consise, humanitarian, emotionally cunning when necessary. Not my favorite of the competition but with a jury of 9, my guess is that they could win their third Palme d’or.

    Tim Grierson: At this point, you know what to expect from the Dardennes, but their empathy is undiminished and their taut, spare suspense sequences remain under-appreciated. No longer able to surprise us, they just keep doing their thing, and god bless ‘em for it.

    Donald Clarke: TORI AND LOKITA feels like the Dardennes’ best work in close to a decade. Two immigrant kids struggle against exploitation everywhere. You already know the aesthetic. Tense, awfully sad and — their usual plot contrivances noted — rooted in the real.

    Iana Murray: tori and lokita: the kids are so great but… oof

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    AMG
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    #1204962398

    Decision To Leave has 3.2 in jury grid of Screen International, the biggest rating for the movies in official competition.

    Crimes of the Future has 2.5.

    Current Screen Jury Ranking

    Decision To Leave = 3.2
    Armageddon Time = 2.8
    Eo = 2.7
    Triangle of Sadness = 2.5
    RMN = 2.5
    Crimes of the Future = 2.5
    Boy From Heaven = 2.3
    Tchaikovsky’s Wife = 2.2
    Holy Spider = 2.1
    The Eight Mountains = 2.1
    Brother & Sister = 2.1
    Forever Young = 1.8

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    Stefania
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    #1204962425

    How is it possible that “Decision to Leave” is first in Screen Jury but second to last in ICS?

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    roger88
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    #1204962436

    This is exactly what I mentioned prior. The reception of Decision to Leave outside anglosphere has been actually mixed. Some of the really harsh reviews came from French and German critics and also the Chinese grid has it as the lowest reviewed film.

    This is like Desplechin with French raving the film but overseas…

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    Rachel615
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    #1204962451

    Cannes Metacritic scores thus far:

    Decision to Leave: 90
    Aftersun: 90
    All That breathes: 87
    Corsage: 81
    Top Gun: Maverick: 80
    Moonage Daydream: 80
    Armageddon Time: 74
    RMN: 72
    Crimes of the Future: 71
    Triangle of Sadness: 66
    Brother and Sister: 58
    Three Thousand Years of Longing: 57
    Final Cut: 51
    Tchaikovskys Wife: 49

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    Stefania
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    #1204962459

    This is exactly what I mentioned prior. The reception of Decision to Leave outside anglosphere has been actually mixed. Some of the really harsh reviews came from French and German critics and also the Chinese grid has it as the lowest reviewed film. This is like Desplechin with French raving the film but overseas…

    Yes, but screen jury also has international critics, so it’s totally random.

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    Rachel615
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    #1204962462

    This is exactly what I mentioned prior. The reception of Decision to Leave outside anglosphere has been actually mixed. Some of the really harsh reviews came from French and German critics and also the Chinese grid has it as the lowest reviewed film. This is like Desplechin with French raving the film but overseas…

    Well, FWIW, for Oscar prediction purposes, it may be useful to keep in mind that critics aren’t AMPAS members, and while AMPAS membership has significantly expanded in the last decade, there are still FAR more members from the “anglosphere” than members from “non-anglosphere” countries.

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    kbc
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    #1204962492

    Neon Acquires Ruben Östlund’s Buzzy Cannes Satire ‘Triangle Of Sadness’

    Neon follows its Broker buy with Triangle of Sadness.

    FYC
    Best Picture: "Showing Up" (A24); “Bones & All” (MGM/UA)
    Best Director: Kelly Reichardt; Luca Guadagnino
    Best Actress: Michelle Williams; Taylor Russell
    Best Actor: Timothee Chalamet
    Best Supporting Actress: Hong Chau, Heather Lawless, Amanda Plummer; Chloe Sevigny
    Best Supporting Actor: Judd Hirsch, Andre Benjamin, John Magaro; Mark Rylance, Andre Holland, Michael Stuhlbarg
    Best Original Screenplay: Kelly Reichardt, Jonathan Raymond
    Best Adapted Screenplay: David Kajganich

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    roger88
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    #1204962496

    Well, FWIW, for Oscar prediction purposes, it may be useful to keep in mind that critics aren’t AMPAS members, and while AMPAS membership has significantly expanded in the last decade, there are still FAR more members from the “anglosphere” than members from “non-anglosphere” countries.

    And still even with the “anglosphere” bubble, there are still some question related to the film’s broader appeal considering there were words used like “slow burn”.

    For a foreign film like this, it’s essential/key to have those non anglosphere voters on favour.

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    kamila
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    #1204962518

    https://deadline.com/2022/05/triangle-of-sadness-film-from-ruben-ostlund-acquired-by-neon-1235031705/embed/#?secret=jfLpHzxKih#?secret=s5SvP9YjUb Neon follows its Broker buy with Triangle of Sadness.

    Wow they are ready to play. But I’m curious how many theaters they will put these films in.

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    Dec 12th, 2020
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    #1204962732

    Cannes Metacritic scores thus far: Decision to Leave: 90 Aftersun: 90 All That breathes: 87 Corsage: 81 Top Gun: Maverick: 80 Moonage Daydream: 80 Armageddon Time: 74 RMN: 72 Crimes of the Future: 71 Triangle of Sadness: 66 Brother and Sister: 58 Three Thousand Years of Longing: 57 Final Cut: 51 Tchaikovskys Wife: 49

    Wow. They hate the new George Miller

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    AMG
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    #1204962832

    Nostalgia First Reactions

    Guy Lodge: I admit I rolled my eyes when they announced a new Mario Martone film in competition at Cannes, but either he’s changed or I have. Much to like about NOSTALGIA: first half gorgeous, second more generic but still flavourful. I’ll take it!

    Total Film: ruminative Mario Martone drama about a man returning to his native Naples and attempting to reckon with the hostile remnants of his freewheeling youth. The city looks exquisite, but this is too sluggish to engage, with an inexplicably stubborn lead

    Lee Marshall: Martone crafts a passionate, angry film that is full of atmosphere and great performances, but never fully convincing or compelling as a drama.

    Pascal Gavillet: The return of an expatriate to his native Naples after 40 years of absence. An outdated classicism for an uneven auteur who is more accustomed to Venice. Too ordinary to make a difference in the Cannes competition.

    Ilan Ferry: Mario Martone films Naples like his main character: frozen in time, haunted by his ghosts, prisoner of an inexorable tumult that overwhelms him. Implacable, Nostalgia sounds like the painful acknowledgment of a present irreconcilable with its past.

    Alexis Roux: Despite a somewhat promising start, the film is lost in a confused and lethargic contemplation, skimming over one of the most interesting aspects of its script (the misery of the Neapolitan gangs of today).

    Alexandre Janowiak: Mario Martone makes his western in the middle of Naples with Nostalgia. Except it’s a western where you look each other in the eyes for 2 hours without telling each other anything, it becomes a dull film. In short, it’s deadly boring. Apart from Favino and the music, there is nothing to save.

    Jean Luis Caviaro: Homecoming of a tormented man. A film concerned with showing the authentic Naples, with a dedicated Pierfrancesco Favino, with a clumsy narrative and full of anodyne moments. I think it should not be in competition.

    Lovia Gyarkye: with a formidable cast, assured direction and skillful camerawork, Nostalgia proves to be a surprisingly absorbing film, one that could find audiences outside of Italy.

    Todd McCarthy: Almost all mafia stories have a time-tested draw, and this one has the fantastic advantage of a densely displayed real-life setting and a lack of cliched old-school conventions. But the main character is massively naive which renders him an ultimately unsympathetic figure.

    Cyprien Caddeo: With Nostalgia, Martone is not bluffing. At home, Proust’s madeleines end up stewed. A cinema that is both melancholy and loud in mouths, starting with that of Pierfrancesco Favino, who cannot leave Cannes empty-handed.

    Check out more of my thoughts on Twitter (@AMG_Review) and Instagram (amg_reviews)

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    kbc
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    #1204962845

    Wow. They hate the new George Miller

    Definitely a polarizing film, with several critics even disagreeing over which parts (the fantastical or the more grounded) they thought worked better, while another faction just gave it tons o’ love. From all descriptions, it’s absolutely a Miller pet project, for good and for ill, that got off the ground only b/c he cashed in his “Fury Road” chips before diving into the obligatory sequel.

    FYC
    Best Picture: "Showing Up" (A24); “Bones & All” (MGM/UA)
    Best Director: Kelly Reichardt; Luca Guadagnino
    Best Actress: Michelle Williams; Taylor Russell
    Best Actor: Timothee Chalamet
    Best Supporting Actress: Hong Chau, Heather Lawless, Amanda Plummer; Chloe Sevigny
    Best Supporting Actor: Judd Hirsch, Andre Benjamin, John Magaro; Mark Rylance, Andre Holland, Michael Stuhlbarg
    Best Original Screenplay: Kelly Reichardt, Jonathan Raymond
    Best Adapted Screenplay: David Kajganich

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