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First Man

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  • Eddy Q
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    #1202663624

    lol @ comparing Scorsese to Chazelle. Take a seat.

    Sweetheart, I know it’s super hard for your brain to comprehend even the slightest bit of nuance, but I’ll do my best. Contrary to your assertion, I was not making a blanket comparison between Chazelle and Scorsese. I was simply citing one expensive B.O. flop that happens to be directed by Scorsese as an example of the Academy, and specifically the directors branch, not being deterred by a film’s flop status and nominating it in major categories. I even accounted for the counter-argument that Scorsese has a much higher status than Chazelle in my previous post, but then qualified it by pointing out that the directors branch don’t nominate Scorsese willy-nilly – Silence being an example, as well as a good chunk of his work from the 80s and 90s.

    I don’t know whether or not Chazelle can achieve with First Man what Scorsese did with Hugo Oscar-wise, and I’m willing to hear further (civil) arguments against it happening, and against the comparison in general. But when you can only respond by distorting someone else’s point, it’s time for you to take several seats.

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    AviChristiaans
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    #1202663628

    Felicity Jones shouldn’t have been in lead anyways, it was just such a weak year that it made sense to nab that lead nom. Any other year she probably would have gone supporting

    But Felicity Jones was Lead though. The film was an adaptation of Jane Hawking’s memoir. It was her story. Her telling the story. The second half of the film is all Felicity Jones.

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    Eddy Q
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    #1202663631

    (Also to weigh in just for the hell of it, Jones was more of a lead than Redmayne in Theory of Everything and same for Vikander in Danish Girl)

    It’s painfully obvious that if The Theory of Everything and The Danish Girl had been made and released the other way round, Jones and Vikander would’ve taken each other’s awards strategy. 2014 was an open field for lead actresses with such a strong frontrunner in Supporting that it was pointless going for the latter. 2015 was much more cluttered in Best Actress while there was no clear early frontrunner in Supporting among non-fraud contenders.

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    Honey
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    #1202663634

    It’s painfully obvious that if The Theory of Everything and The Danish Girl had been made and released the other way round, Jones and Vikander would’ve taken each other’s awards strategy. 2014 was an open field for lead actresses with such a strong frontrunner in Supporting that it was pointless going for the latter. 2015 was much more cluttered in Best Actress while there was no clear early frontrunner in Supporting among non-fraud contenders.

    i like the present timeline of fraudkander winning if it means Not sitting through Kate Winslet winning another Oscar for less than nothing performance

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    wattsgold
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    #1202663641

    It’s painfully obvious that if The Theory of Everything and The Danish Girl had been made and released the other way round, Jones and Vikander would’ve taken each other’s awards strategy. 2014 was an open field for lead actresses with such a strong frontrunner in Supporting that it was pointless going for the latter. 2015 was much more cluttered in Best Actress while there was no clear early frontrunner in Supporting among non-fraud contenders.

    OT from this movie, but no one will die for another post… I agree 100% with your comment about the supporting race from 2014, even though it took me a full minute to remember that Arquette won that one.

    When I think about 2015, I always think they could have done a better job with Best actress nominations because the line-up was more “meh” than “yes!”. Did Lawrence and Blanchett REALLY have to be there? Like where they so stunning? Ronan and Rampling make a lot of sense and Mara should have fought the battle to be there, so I guess Vikander would have been 5th or something in that category. Now, this year supporting actress will most likely face that same lame scenario.

    I could say something about the movie, but have not seen it. Foy is an asset though.

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    Marcus.H
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    #1202663941

    Can we come back to the discussion of First Man?

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    AwardsConnect
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    #1202664292

    My two cents…

    A sense of deja vu came over me throughout First Man, director Damien Chazelle’s latest collaboration with leading man Ryan Gosling.

    Two years ago, I wast thoroughly enchanted by Gosling’s Oscar-nominated turn in Chazelle’s La La Land, a film which, despite my affection for its actors and overall look and feel, left me rather cold. An absorbing love story and Chazelle’s palpable affection for movie musicals aside, I never felt it quite got off the ground, nor, perhaps most egregious of all, did it sport a terribly memorable soundtrack.

    Fast-forward to the present awards season and, once again, I am head over heels for Gosling – for my money, First Man marks career-best work and should catapult him right toward the top in the race for Best Actor – and decidedly less enamored with the proceedings around him.

    This isn’t to say First Man is a bad picture but, after being spoiled in recent years by the dazzling likes of Gravity and Hidden Figures, it marks a surprisingly ho-hum endeavor.

    Gosling portrays Neil Armstrong, the legendary American astronaut who, as you may have heard, made history in 1969 as the first person to walk on the moon. First Man opens on Armstrong eight years prior to that awe-inspiring event as the test pilot finds himself on a streak of aerodynamic calamities. Colleagues are concerned he is distracted, which is indeed the case – he and wife Janet (Claire Foy) are devastated by the failing health of young daughter Karen, who ultimately succumbs to a brain tumor.

    Overwhelmed with grief, Armstrong dives further into work, applying for NASA’s Project Gemini. Accepted into the program, the Armstrongs join other astronaut families in moving out to Houston. With the Soviets making progress in their spacecraft efforts, Armstrong squarely focuses on his training and, in 1966, is named commander of the aborted Gemini 8 mission. Toward the close of the decade, Armstrong is again called upon to steer the ship, this time as commander of Apollo 11. The rest, of course, is history.

    First Man is at once refreshingly unsentimental and curiously uninspiring.

    Gosling’s restrained portrayal of Armstrong is brimming with melancholy and deeply affecting – he keeps the picture absorbing even while Josh Singer’s screenplay proves a colossal bore. Less successful is Foy, a usually marvelous actress who hits only familiar notes as Armstrong’s fretful wife. At least Foy has some modest meat to chew on, however – the rest of the cast is uniformly underused.

    From a technical perspective, First Man marks a grand achievement in sound mixing and editing, with Chazelle doing a fine, if often workmanlike job staging the mission sequences. What is ultimately, stunningly missing from the picture is any sense of awe, that intense feeling of wonderment that swept the world on July 20, 1969.

    First Man marks a triumph for its leading man but otherwise doesn’t much soar.

    B

    For the finest in film reviews and awards analysis, please visit me at The Awards Connection!

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    Eden
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    #1202670873

    Claire Foy is the heart of the movie. Having said that, I took her out of my predictions recently. The category is competitive and the box office didn’t help. It reminds me of Dunkirk, scoring picture and directing nominations, decent number of tech nominations and winning at least one of them. Dunkirk wasn’t an acting vehicle, which is where the comparison fails. Come January, First Man could follow the path of Dunkirk (Picture + tech noms), Phantom Thread (Picture + Director + Gosling + Foy) or The Post (Picture + Gosling).

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    PerksofBeingaGriff
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    #1202670885

    Foy would get in over Gosling. She has more buzz than him by far.

    “Someone is staring at you in ‘Personal Growth’.”

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    Atypical
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    #1202670931

    Hopefully Foy won’t suffer for “First Man”‘s poor box office. She’s more than earned her nod in supporting actress.

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    AwardsConnect
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    #1202670977

    Foy is now 6th in my Supporting Actress predictions. My sense, oddly enough, is she may land at all three of GG/SAG/BAFTA and still miss the Oscar cut.

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    nkb325
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    #1202671033

    Claire Foy is the heart of the movie. Having said that, I took her out of my predictions recently. The category is competitive and the box office didn’t help. It reminds me of Dunkirk, scoring picture and directing nominations, decent number of tech nominations and winning at least one of them. Dunkirk wasn’t an acting vehicle, which is where the comparison fails. Come January, First Man could follow the path of Dunkirk (Picture + tech noms), Phantom Thread (Picture + Director + Gosling + Foy) or The Post (Picture + Gosling).

    I see it more following the path of Steve Jobs, another movie that looked like massive oscar bait on paper, got positive but somewhat cold and muted critical praise and tanked at the box office. So Actor and Supporting Actress but not much else, maybe a technical nod or two or maybe squeezing into picture (I have a feeling there are many in the academy who feel bad for Chazelle after what happened with La La Land, although I don’t).

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    Vincent Yeoh
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    I love Justin Hurwitz’s stirring score and would definitely give it a nomination.

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    nicholas27
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    My two cents… A sense of deja vu came over me throughout First Man, director Damien Chazelle’s latest collaboration with leading man Ryan Gosling. Two years ago, I wast thoroughly enchanted by Gosling’s Oscar-nominated turn in Chazelle’s La La Land, a film which, despite my affection for its actors and overall look and feel, left me rather cold. An absorbing love story and Chazelle’s palpable affection for movie musicals aside, I never felt it quite got off the ground, nor, perhaps most egregious of all, did it sport a terribly memorable soundtrack. Fast-forward to the present awards season and, once again, I am head over heels for Gosling – for my money, First Man marks career-best work and should catapult him right toward the top in the race for Best Actor – and decidedly less enamored with the proceedings around him. This isn’t to say First Man is a bad picture but, after being spoiled in recent years by the dazzling likes of Gravity and Hidden Figures, it marks a surprisingly ho-hum endeavor. Gosling portrays Neil Armstrong, the legendary American astronaut who, as you may have heard, made history in 1969 as the first person to walk on the moon. First Man opens on Armstrong eight years prior to that awe-inspiring event as the test pilot finds himself on a streak of aerodynamic calamities. Colleagues are concerned he is distracted, which is indeed the case – he and wife Janet (Claire Foy) are devastated by the failing health of young daughter Karen, who ultimately succumbs to a brain tumor. Overwhelmed with grief, Armstrong dives further into work, applying for NASA’s Project Gemini. Accepted into the program, the Armstrongs join other astronaut families in moving out to Houston. With the Soviets making progress in their spacecraft efforts, Armstrong squarely focuses on his training and, in 1966, is named commander of the aborted Gemini 8 mission. Toward the close of the decade, Armstrong is again called upon to steer the ship, this time as commander of Apollo 11. The rest, of course, is history. First Man is at once refreshingly unsentimental and curiously uninspiring. Gosling’s restrained portrayal of Armstrong is brimming with melancholy and deeply affecting – he keeps the picture absorbing even while Josh Singer’s screenplay proves a colossal bore. Less successful is Foy, a usually marvelous actress who hits only familiar notes as Armstrong’s fretful wife. At least Foy has some modest meat to chew on, however – the rest of the cast is uniformly underused. From a technical perspective, First Man marks a grand achievement in sound mixing and editing, with Chazelle doing a fine, if often workmanlike job staging the mission sequences. What is ultimately, stunningly missing from the picture is any sense of awe, that intense feeling of wonderment that swept the world on July 20, 1969. First Man marks a triumph for its leading man but otherwise doesn’t much soar. B For the finest in film reviews and awards analysis, please visit me at The Awards Connection!

    i respectfully disagree with this…I found the movie quite touching in its own quiet way. there was one moment on the moon that moved me very deeply and resonated long after I left the theater. Armstrong’s emotions are not bombastic, so it is harder to empathize with his stoic character but regardless, to say that moment on the moon or the ending shot was unsentimental feels strange to me…I agree that the characters portrayals were the most deeply affecting aspects but this is partly because of how the story progresses and because we get to know Armstrong. my jaw also dropped at several wonderful shots and the real and intense use of shaky cam. interesting how we all interpret aspects of a movie so differently…anyway at least we can agree that Gosling and the sound editing were awe inspiring!

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