Home Forums Movies Is Christopher Nolan one of the greatest directors of all time?

Is Christopher Nolan one of the greatest directors of all time?

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
Created
6 months ago
Last Reply
6 months ago
21
replies
2144
views
18
users
Dan Backslide
2
Hoster1
2
The2ndAvenger
2
Is Christopher Nolan one of the greatest directors of all time?
Yes
No
  • Profile picture
    MrOceanBlueEyes
    Joined:
    Dec 28th, 2018
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203513901

    I saw this about the characters he writes and yes they are not as fleshed as they could be and that’s probably why Ledger is the only one to be nominated let alone win an oscar in a Nolan movie.

    I think he does something that’s very common in books rather than movies which is a plot focused driven movie. Not that there aren’t any other plot driven movies but in books sometimes plot driven stories don’t tend to focus on character development, they are only there to move the story along and don’t necessarily get to develop themself. And I think it’s something not everyone knows because we are so used to movies developing characters while also developing the plot. Every action the character makes influences the movie which ultimately makes the characters pieces for the bigger puzzle. But as I said it’s a book thing rather than a movie thing, which is why his scripts are great.

    Also the way the movies flow *chef’s kiss*

    Other than that.

    Dunkirk, The Dark Knight, Interstellar, Memento, The Prestige and Inception (oh look at that, his filmography is absolutely insanely good). Case closed.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Kelvin
    Joined:
    Mar 10th, 2020
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203514560

    My biggest problem with Nolan is that I feel like, instead of supporting the plot and the characters, his direction always feel overwhelming and unnecessary showy. His films are always superficial and devoid of any actual meaning or depth. So to answer the original question, Nolan is obviously not one of the greatest director of all time. PTA, Wes Anderson and even (ready for the film bro attacks) Greta Gerwig with her limited filmography are all better directors than him.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    The2ndAvenger
    Joined:
    Dec 5th, 2018
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203514707

    My biggest problem with Nolan is that I feel like, instead of supporting the plot and the characters, his direction always feel overwhelming and unnecessary showy. His films are always superficial and devoid of any actual meaning or depth. So to answer the original question, Nolan is obviously not one of the greatest director of all time. PTA, Wes Anderson and even (ready for the film bro attacks) Greta Gerwig with her limited filmography are all better directors than him.

    Well, first of all, the question is not “is he the greatest director of all time,” but “is he ONE OF the greatest directors of all time.”

    I don’t know how people keep attacking Nolan’s films as not being deep. I mean, you’ve got Memento, an examination of self-delusion, memory, trust, and lies. You’ve got The Prestige with themes of rivalry, obsession, secrecy, sacrifice, asking questions like “how far are you willing to go for your art? How far should you go?” It presents neither main character as a clear protagonist/antagonist, leaving the choice up to the viewer. The Dark Knight trilogy is chock-full of political questions about issues such as surveillance, violence, law enforcement, etc. There’s also the development of the character of Bruce Wayne. Inception can be viewed as a metaphor for filmmaking (though I don’t choose to view it as such). It is a portrayal of love, loss, and acceptance. It asks questions about what you are justified in doing to get what you want – is Cobb a hero? Or is he a selfish villain? Or something in between? Interstellar presents philosophical conundrums – does the survival of the human race justify the sacrifice of all humans currently living? There are also themes of love and promises. I, for one, saw how it could easily be seen as an allegorical film, though I do not believe it was intended as such. Dunkirk is a brutally honest depiction of war, and all the heroism, cowardice, utilitarianism, and honor involved.

    Yes, Nolan rarely answers the questions he asks. But that’s not really his job. It’s yours. Yours to struggle and grapple with. Nolan is brilliant at providing food for thought without force-feeding it – allowing his films to be viewed both as mindless entertainment for the mindlessly entertainable and as philosophical material for the philosophically inclined, or any combination of the two.

     

    "It is impossible to defeat an ignorant man in an argument." - William Gibbs McAdoo

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Bassett
    Joined:
    Dec 21st, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203515275

    Nope

    FYC :

    Best Actress - Viola Davis
    Best Actor - Delroy Lindo, Chadwick Boseman
    Best Supp Actor - Daniel Kaluuya, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Cinephile
    Joined:
    Sep 25th, 2017
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203517146

    Yes.

    Whether you like Nolan’s visual style or not. It’s hard to deny the impact of his films in the filmmaking community. The way he challenged what commercial cinema was, and pushed for filmmaking techniques and endeavours to enhance the audience’s theatre experience.

    Some filmmakers make films because they’re passion projects or scripts they personally find interesting. Nolan makes original films for mass audiences. He makes them to challenge audience’s perceptions of genres and doesn’t dumb down or water down his scripts. He asks for the audience’s trust and in return he doesn’t take short cuts, he uses practical effects, he sinks IMAX cameras worth hundreds of thousands of dollars etc

    We talk about the death of middle-tier budget films a lot and how the biggest blockbusters are just cgifest sequels, reboots and cbm. Nolan’s commitment to original stories and it’s ability to get $200+ for his films, have creative freedom, cast a poc non-a list actor etc. It’s hard not to view that in a positive light. I mean isn’t Tenet the most expensive film ever to have a poc lead? And 2nd most expensive films ever to have a female editor?

    Is he on the level of Kubrick or Hitchcock? No. But, his influence in the industry and his commitment to preserving the cinema-going experience and hands-on filmmaking, pushing the boundaries of genres is hard to ignore.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    saragina_rumba
    Joined:
    Jun 6th, 2020
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203519233

    Yes he can be one of the GREATS, and one doesn’t have to be a fan in order to acknowledge his potential. Those who think otherwise are simply….. golden age thinkers. Look deeper.

    The Greats have become so when they have established their own identity; regardless if they even seem one-dimensional. Hitchcock was mainly about noir; Scorsese on crime/gangster; Kurosawa on Japanese period pieces. They don’t have to prove to be all-around, which as a bonus, Nolan can even be. But Nolan is really establishing his identity in these psychological/sci-fi thrillers.

    Perhaps his biggest identity will be his choice of dependent variable that he always explores around in his original screenplays – TIME. He is offering to cinema, stories that raise the questions on what happens when we face the worst circumstances that time provide us? (Memento, Inception, Dunkirk, Interstellar, and now Tenet)

    To understand more what I mean by dependent variable. Think of Wong Kar Wai and SPACE. How he puts his characters always within the tight spaces of Hong Kong. Terry Malick and NATURE. Character’s struggles are always questioned towards nature’s responsibility to the happenings. Martin Scorsese and MORTALITY, and other examples go on and on.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Chitanda170
    Joined:
    Apr 1st, 2020
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203522513

    He has a couple of great movies but he is not at the same level of Kubrick.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
Keri Ru... - Nov 25, 2020
Movies
Jasmine... - Nov 25, 2020
Movies