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Official THE DISASTER ARTIST Thread

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  • Sentinel666
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    #1202422732

    I agree with SAG Ensemble, it could be happened and I believe in that. Three names are enough to get nomination. And If James win SAG, I’ll be very happy of that reason.

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    FreemanGriffin
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    just got home from seeing The Disaster Artist and I was quite surprised by it. I absolutely loved Dave Franco’s performance as Greg, even more than James Franco’s Tommy. I thought JF’s direction was superb. I was most surprised that this film is a “two-hander”, a two character movie, in that there are only two developed characters. Fortunately, their relationship is fascinating. Greg starts out as a naive insecure 19 year old who can’t see through Tommy’s insanity to a more mature twentysomething who begins to grow up and to believe in himself. There are so many different memorable scenes and the two of them simply had amazing chemistry. I would actually like to see Dave Franco as a nominee more than James – his role is more complex and difficult (which is not to say that James isn’t really good too). My only small reservations about this movie is that the supporting cast is really under-developed and some of the camera work could have been better. Grade: A-.

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    Paul Hardister
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    #1202427475

    just got home from seeing The Disaster Artist and I was quite surprised by it. I absolutely loved Dave Franco’s performance as Greg, even more than James Franco’s Tommy. I thought JF’s direction was superb. I was most surprised that this film is a “two-hander”, a two character movie, in that there are only two developed characters. Fortunately, their relationship is fascinating. Greg starts out as a naive insecure 19 year old who can’t see through Tommy’s insanity to a more mature twentysomething who begins to grow up and to believe in himself. There are so many different memorable scenes and the two of them simply had amazing chemistry. I would actually like to see Dave Franco as a nominee more than James – his role is more complex and difficult (which is not to say that James isn’t really good too). My only small reservations about this movie is that the supporting cast is really under-developed and some of the camera work could have been better. Grade: A-.

    I really loved it. It took me by surprise because I thought it was just going to be a spoof of The Room. This movie has heart.

    I think the reason the other characters don’t shine as much is the fact very little is known about these actors. I did think the casting choices were inspired especially Josh Hutcherson as Denny. Also, I’m a huge Nathan Feilder fan so got a big kick out of him.

    Also, loved the soundtrack! It’s #12 at the box office in less than 20 theaters in the US.

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    FreemanGriffin
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    #1202427523

    I have requested that Dave Franco be added to the predictions for Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical (for the Golden Globes). His performance is fantastic! (albeit it’s not really comedic, his performance is more dramatic, with brother James’s being the more comedic one).

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    Sentinel666
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    #1202427528

    I agree, Dave’s performance is great, but his role isn’t so difficult as James role is. Think about it, he had to change his way of speech, his way of moves and everything and he did it excellent. Without laugh and without charge. James destroys every actor from this film on the set of “The Room”. Dave was really great, really really great, but he doesn’t even look like Greg and he doesn’t speak like Greg. Dave will be in new Barry Jenkins movie and I hope his role is big in this, I can’t wait!

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    AwardsConnect
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    #1202428301

    My two cents…

    James Franco, you have come so very far since the 2010 Oscars.

    Franco is a legit tour de force, both in front of and behind the camera, as leading man and director of The Disaster Artist. He has exquisitely approached a role that, in the hands of another, less committed actor, could have easily played as caricature, adding layer upon layer to the irresistibly oddball filmmaker Tommy Wiseau.

    Based on the eponymous 2013 book by actor Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell, The Disaster Artist opens on Sestero who, toward the end of the 1990s, is an aspiring young actor living in San Francisco with his mom (Megan Mullally). Sestero encounters the peculiar Wiseau at an acting class and is awestruck by the audacious scenery-chewing in his rendition of a scene from A Streetcar Named Desire. Over the months to come, the two form an unusual but solicitous bond and, yearning to make it in Hollywood, eventually make the move to L.A.

    On the steep climb to making their dreams come true, Sestero secures an agent (and a girlfriend) but nonetheless finds negligible success, while the industry all-around shuns Wiseau. One day, Sestero casually floats the idea of making his own picture to provide himself with a film role. Wiseau takes this suggestion literally and, over the next three years, pens the screenplay for what will become The Room, now considered one of the worst films ever made and, because of that distinction, an unimpeachable cult classic.

    The making of The Room, which fills out most of the back half of The Disaster Artist, is often devastatingly funny and sure to even resonate with viewers not familiar with Wiseau’s 2003 film. What I especially adore about this picture, however, is the relationship between Wiseau and Sestero and how their chance meeting saved them from the doldrums of ordinary life and inspired them to pursue seemingly impossible dreams.

    Both Francos are in prime form, with James in particular deserving kudos for not approaching Wiseau as some sort of SNL creation. When, toward the beginning of the picture, Wiseau tells Sestero he wishes he could have his own world, a planet where nothing but love exists, he sounds entirely sincere and it’s a stunningly moving moment. The supporting cast is, for the most part, comprised of an endless series of celebrity cameos, some inspired (Josh Hutcherson and Jacki Weaver are a hoot as actors in the film) and others perplexing (please stop giving Zac Efron work).

    Comparisons have, no surprise, been made between The Disaster Artist and Ed Wood, Tim Burton’s picture about another lovably dreadful filmmaker. While this film does not operate on the same sky-high level as Ed Wood, it’s still one heck of a great time and a strong contender for the year’s funniest film.

    A-

    For the finest in film reviews and awards analysis, please visit me at The Awards Connection!

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    Riley Chow
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    There have definitely been movies that have made me laugh and cry, but this might be the first that made me do those things simultaneously.  Half of the movie was just reliving The Room, which is so much fun; the other half was an exceedingly sentimental story about friendship.  I would be laughing at something from The Room, then they would hit me with a shot of James Franco in pain or vice versa.  I can see how it has the 76 on Metacritic though because the movie did not approach the emotional moments with the most grace, from characters flatly stating that they were there to support each other to the clichéd musical cues.

    James Franco gave a very broad performance, but upon reflection, what is most impressive is that he played bad well.  I did not even realize that this was challenging for actors, but it seemed like nobody else was even trying.  The Disaster Artist made it seem like Tommy Wiseau made a terrible film headlined by a terrible performance by himself.  The reality is that everybody in The Room was terrible, except maybe Chris-R.   Josh Hutcherson, Jacki Weaver and Nathan Fielder were far better than their counterparts.  What FreemanGriffin posted above baffles me because Dave Franco was just Dave Franco the whole movie.  Your mileage may vary on the criticism of actors seemingly playing themselves, but this is one case in which that kind of performance should be unacceptable, since we have a real person to compare that he is supposed to be portraying.  I thought that Seth Rogen would have more, but his role had no range and his character was not explored.  It is a same because I thought that he should have been nominated for 50/50.

    Although they are campaigning others and the poster highlights others than the Francos and Rogen, those three seem to be the only ones eligible for SAG ensemble.  The rest of the cast is billed in two large alphabetical blocks, somewhat understandable given all of the cameos.  Would have been cool for  Bob Odenkirk to have potential for yet another SAG nomination this year, but oh well.

    He would obviously be very deserving, but I do not have Franco in my Oscar predictions at this time.  PaulHan/Guest2014 actually got at what I have been thinking when he posted on the last page that “This’ll make about 50 cents at the boxoffice.”  I worry about the perception of the film as not meeting expectations because they are too high in the first place.  This is a movie for people who have seen The Room and as big as The Room is, it is a “cult” film and they want The Disaster Artist to be a mainstream success.  Does this film ever even need to go wide?  Blade Runner 2049 has grossed hundreds of millions of dollars, yet it has the stink of failure because the studio spent too much money on it and expected a mainstream success from a cult film, beloved as it is.  I even remember reports of Drive under-performing.  That is a film that grossed its budget five times over internationally, but was opening it in thousands of theatres for an $11 million opening weekend really a good idea?  Either The Disaster Artist does not appeal to the academy like so many great films (like Drive) or it gets bad buzz from poor box office returns.  I only have it in for screenplay because A24 pulled through for 20th Century Women there last year.

    I saw The Room in full for the first time just before The Disaster Artist and it was the perfect viewing experience, with a theatre audience laughing the whole time, but nothing being thrown at the screen and without people shouting lines as I hear happens.  Co-author Tom Bissell really nailed why it is so fascinating when he said to Vox, “There’s not often that a work of film has every creative decision made in it on a moment-by-moment basis seemingly be the wrong one.”

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    LaChienne
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    The reality is that everybody in The Room was terrible, except maybe Chris-R.

    Dan “The Man” Janjigian studied Uta Hagen and Stanislavski’s system for the part, thus a model for all about giving it 100% no matter your circumstances.

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    Anonymous
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    This post was found to be inappropriate by the moderators and has been removed.
    Anonymous
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    OscarsSoWrong
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    My God this movie was horrible. Not once did I laugh, and the audience laughter consisted of a few people, just over laughing at things that were truly not that funny. James Franco performance was OK, David Franco was pretty annoying here, and I don’t think this movie should be up for Oscars, but rather Razzies. I’m honestly shocked at the rave reviews. It feels more like a ploy. This movie definitely did not need to be made, and “the worst movie ever” is an overstatement, because I don’t think ‘The Room’ ever took itself seriously to begin with.

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    Tyler The Awesome Guy
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    #1202429612

    My God this movie was horrible. Not once did I laugh, and the audience laughter consisted of a few people, just over laughing at things that were truly not that funny. James Franco performance was OK, David Franco was pretty annoying here, and I don’t think this movie should be up for Oscars, but rather Razzies. I’m honestly shocked at the rave reviews. It feels more like a ploy. This movie definitely did not need to be made, and “the worst movie ever” is an overstatement, because I don’t think ‘The Room’ ever took itself seriously to begin with.

    So would you say this movie was better or worse than The Room?

    I'm not perfect, but I keep trying.

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    Riley Chow
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    #1202429647

    Dave Franco is being frauded into supporting actor.

    This is even better in light of the fact that James went out of his way to give Dave first billing in the end credits to give his career a small boost.

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