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Oscars Out of Kodak after 2013 Show??

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  • PaulHJR
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    #47965

    Hollywood Reporter says it’s a distinct possibility.  But where would they go?

    —-

    The group that puts on the Academy Awards is mulling a plan to move the most famous event in show business from its longtime home, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. 

    After nearly a decade at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, last week the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences exercised a clause in its contract and notified the CIM Group, which owns the venue, that it may move the Oscars elsewhere after the 2013 show.

    “Our plan right now is to exercise this [option] and then see what happens, what goes on. We’re open,” Tom Sherak, president of the Academy, tells THR in an interview. “Personally, I love the Kodak. I’ll say that until I’m blue in the face. I’ve been there since the very beginning. But in the next year the Kodak and others will come to us and the [Academy] board will make a decision at some point.”

    The Oscars have been held at the Kodak since 2002 but the Academy’s long-term contract with the venue includes an “out” clause after ten years.

    “This is purely a business decision,” says a member of the Academy board of governors, the non-profit group’s version of a board of directors. “The bottom line is we are going to look at other places and listen to all offers. We may ultimately decide to stay where we are if we can renegotiate a better lease. Don’t forget, things have happened there.”

    The board member is referring to the financial problems plaguing Kodak. Once a global giant, the Rochester, New York-based company has not been able to successfully make the transition from a world where images are captured on film to one where everything is done digitally. In October, Kodak denied it is going bankrupt but admitted that it has hired an investment bank to help it sort out its options.   

    It was a different situation in July 2000 when Kodak acquired naming rights to the 3,401 seat theater in the then-new Hollywood & Highland complex on Hollywood Blvd. Kodak, then still a global leader in imaging, agreed to pay $75 million over 20 years to have its name on the theater. It has been making $4 million annual payments ever since.

    But if Kodak does not, or cannot, continue as the name sponsor on the theater, the CIM Group will likely seek to sell the naming rights to another business. Having the Oscars would be a huge calling card in such a negotiation, as it guarantees global brand exposure. That is the leverage the Academy believes gives it muscle in re-negotiating its contract.

    On Friday, a spokesperson for the CIM Group said Kodak is current on its payments. The company declined to comment further, saying that its executives were unavailable due to the holiday.

    A decade ago, the Kodak deal was a coup for the Academy. After years of moving the Oscars among different venues, the new theater was designed by David Rockwell of the Rockwell Group and Theatre Projects Consultants in consultation with the Academy to create the perfect home for the annual telecast seen by more than 1 billion people worldwide. The first Oscar show held in the Kodak took place in March 2002. The next one takes place on Feb. 26, 2012.

    The Kodak has significant advantages over some other Los Angeles theaters. It has one of the largest stages anywhere, which measures 113 feet wide by 60 feet deep. It has a special cockpit for camera, sound and stage management in the orchestra seating area. It also has underground cabling to connect it to trucks and other equipments outside the theater.

    Losing the Oscars would be a big blow to the Hollywood & Highland center and owner CIM Group. The complex itself pays tribute to its most famous tenant. The grand staircase at the entrance to the theater is flanked by columns bearing the names of past best picture Oscar winners. In addition, a number of events have left the Kodak in recent years, including the American Idol finals, which moved to the Nokia Theater at L.A. Live downtown, which has about 7,000 seats – nearly twice the Kodak. A new Cirque Du Soleil production, Iris, has taken up residence at the theater. 

    The decision on whether to stay in the Kodak comes at a time of major changes in Academy leadership. In April, Dawn Hudson replaced longtime executive director Bruce Davis, who retired. Since then, sources say the Academy has been looking at all aspects of its business and operations. The 2012 ceremony will be the last with Sherak as Academy president. He has been on the board for nine years and has been president for three years, and under the bylaws he cannot run again.

       When an attorney told Sherak that there was an option to be exercised if the Academy wanted to consider other theaters a decade after the original deal was signed, he discussed it with the new leadership and the board, who then made the decision to notify the Kodak that the Academy would not simply renew its deal.

    The Academy governor who spoke with THR insists the group is not unhappy with the Kodak Theatre. It simply was a prudent business decision to explore all options. The group actually likes the venue, this person said, and prefers to keep the ceremony in Hollywood. But it will depend on the deal the group is offered in comparison to other possible arenas that are available.

    Over the years, the Oscars have been held in both large and small venues, in Hollywood and elsewhere. The first Oscar ceremonies were held in 1929 at the Roosevelt Hotel, across the street from the Hollywood & Highland complex. The event, held as a banquet, then moved to the Ambassador and Biltmore Hotels.

    Beginning in 1942, in order to accommodate more attendees, the ceremony and the banquet, now called the Governor’s Ball, were separated. In the mid-40s, the Oscars were held in Grauman’s Chinese Theater, which is adjacent to what is now the Hollywood & Highland mall. In 1949, the 21st awards were held in a theater owned by the Academy on Melrose Ave. It then moved to what was called the RKO Pantages Theater in Hollywood for 11 years. That was where the Oscars were held on March 19, 1953, the first year it became a television event as well.

    In 1961, Oscars moved to the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. In 1969, the Academy Awards were held in the then-new 2,500-seat Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center in downtown L.A. They remained there until 1987, when they moved to the larger Shrine Auditorium near the USC campus in downtown L.A. That venue accommodated more than 6,000 attendees.

    The Oscars shifted back and forth between the Music Center and Shine until they moved in 2002 to the Kodak, which was announced as their new “permanent” home.

    The Academy takes over the Kodak each winter for about one month, which includes time to prepare, hold the event and then to clear the theater. The rest of the year the Kodak is used as the permanent home of Iris, In theory, that show could go year around if the Oscars left.

    Meanwhile, the Academy is busy with other projects that require funding, making the board even more conscious of the need to raise money and save cash wherever possible. Earlier this year the Academy announced plans for a new museum to be created in partnership with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is to be in a former department store space near LACMA, the Petersen Automotive Museum and the George C. Page Museum. It is projected to be open in three years.

    The Academy also is planning to build a new open air stadium that will show movies on real estate it owns in Hollywood not far from the Hollywood & Highland complex. That site was originally to be home to a much more ambitious movie museum but due to economic conditions never got built.

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    DD
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    #47967

    I think the Academy has far bigger problems than this. They can always find a place to have the Oscars. Now getting more people to actually watch the telecast is another story.

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    PaulHJR
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    #47968

    As far as getting people to watch; well, those were self-inflicted wounds when the Academy goes off the reservation and honors indie films as their BP’s that fewer people in mainstreet America see than a Return of the King, Titanic, Avatar, etc.  Try and balance the BP nominees with fans/critics choices and critics-only choices.  Folks will come back if they feel they have an emotional stake in the outcome.  That’s why The Hurt Locker’s near-sweep was a devastating blow to Oscar’s long-term TV ratings (see the 10% decline in total audience and 13% minus in the demo for the 2011 ceremony).  The Who, people – we won’t get fooled again.

    Sometimes, there’ll be years like this where the overall movie quality just plain bites and balance cannot be achieved per the above.  All you had are blockbusters that critics couldn’t wait to warp speed away from.  If you have all-indie BP choices and face pushback as to why they’re not distributed moreso around the country, then gently deflect that criticism toward the studios that release them.  Or have Academy members explain to the media why they chose little movies and try and get them over to a skeptical public. 

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    Scottferguson
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    #47969

    You aren’t the people, Paul. You are one person with his own opinion. You, like the rest of us, speak for nobody other than yourself.

    My guess, with competitive races, hit films in the thick of things and several fan favorites up for acting Oscars that the ratings will likely be up this year,

    If so, feel free to explain how that fits into your theory.

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    MissyGal
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    #47970

    Wasn’t the Kodak built specifically for the Oscar ceremony?

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    Scottferguson
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    #47971

    My recollection is that the architects and landlord has a deal in place with the Academy – 10 years with an option it terms out – and this entered into their design. However its location would always have included a similar theme to its construction.

    The Academy did make it loud and clear that they had found their permanent home. Because of that, this looks a little shady on their part. Tom Sherak (who I knew for years when he was in charge of Fox’s film distribution) is far more aggressive as a businessman than previous Academy presidents (his whole tenure shows that). This looks like a negotiating tactic more than a threat to leave, but it may leave a bit of a bad taste.

    The only real problem the site has as far as I know is that it might be a bit too small (it is larger than the Dorothy Chandler Pavillion, much smaller than the Shrine Auditorium, the two sites for years prior to the move). It is less comfortable than it looks on TV. But it certainly is a reasonable space, well-located and having a large banquet hall in the complex that is perfect for the Governors’ Ball. It is also a much shorter trip to the after parties (only a couple miles) and to the main hotels where people stay.

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    PaulHJR
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    #47972

    Unless they’re that gung-ho on adding 4000 more seats (Nokia LA Live)…when I was out in LA for the world premiere of Forgetting Sarah Marshall, the after party was at Hollywood and Highland’s Level 3.  Mere steps away.

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    montana82
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    #47973

    I miss the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.  I liked it best when it was held there.

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    PaulHJR
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    #47974

    Maybe the Academy will vamoose before 2013: 
    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/business/2012/01/wsj-kodak-preparing-for-bankruptcy/

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    TV12
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    #47975

    Maybe you should refrain from making rdiculous statements that have nothing to do with the post you link to.

    That’s harsh. Kodak filing for bankrupcy could definately affect the Academy’s desicion.

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    Scottferguson
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    #47976

    You’re right – I read it as meaning the Academy would go out of existence. I deleted my post.

    I’m sure the Academy wants to stay there, they’re just trying to get a better deal. They probably are anticipating issues and just positioning themselves to take advantage of the situation. I doubt they would want to take over the space (as landlord), but they probably are thinking what options they have.

    If Kodak’s possible bankruptcy occurs, the building will remain, and the city of LA would make damn sure – it’s a huge part of Hollywood redevelopment – that it stays operative.

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    TV12
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    #47977

    The theater would of course remain. But it could wind up in the hands of a corporation that doesn’t wish to deal with the Academy, though whoever would do that is mental.

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    Scottferguson
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    #47978

    they are the anchor of the site – without the Oscars they’d be in real trouble

    the kind of bankruptcy they may file for basically means business as usual, more or less, continues – they might be forced to give up interests in the theater, but someone else would step in

    (there is another group that performs in the theater the rest of the year, by all indications doing fine, so they’d be there as well)

    it’s possible the Academy made their move at the suggestion of their lawyers, not only to take advantage of the situation, but to protect themselves in the unlikely event of a bad bankruptcy situation or the theater was sold to an organization that didn’t seem so friendly to them

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