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RIP Malik Bendjelloul – ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ director found dead at 36

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  • Beau S.
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    #153759

    http://www.indiewire.com/article/oscar-winning-searching-for-sugar-man-director-dead-at-36?utm_campaign=Searching_For_Sugarman_Dir_Dead&utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_content=oscar-winning-searching-for-sugar-man-director-dead-at-36

    Oscar-Winning ‘Searching For Sugar Man’ Director Dead at 36

    “Searching for Sugar Man” director Malik Bendjelloul
    Nigel M. Smith

    The Academy Award-winning filmmaker of “Searching For Sugar Man,”
    Malik Bendjelloul, was found dead today in Stockholm, according to
    police reports. Bendjelloul, 36, won the Academy for Best Documentary
    last year for the film, about his search for the musician Sixto Diaz
    Rodriguez. Bendjelloul directed, produced, edited and co-wrote the film,
    which initially premiered at Sundance in 2012 where it won the Audience
    Award. The film, which was the director’s first, also won awards for
    Best Documentary from the DGA, PGA, WGA, BAFTA, NBR and other festivals.

    “Searching for Sugar Man”

    In his review of the film at Sundance, Eric Kohn wrote, “The director makes a convincing case for Rodriguez as a phantom rock
    star, no less valid in its iconoclastic value than Bob Dylan, but never
    validated by the marketplace.”

    Bendjelloul recently told The New York Times
    about how anonymous the musician was before the film first screened at
    Sundance. “Many people didn’t know when the film started who he was at
    all. They even thought that he was dead for the first half-hour. So
    seeing him in the flesh an hour later was powerful. That’s what you can
    do with documentaries.”

    Police
    spokeswoman Pia Glenvik said the Swedish filmmaker died in Stockholm
    late Tuesday, but didn’t specify the cause of death except to say there
    was no crime suspected, according to the Associated Press.

    Reply
    babypook
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    #153761

    Tragic loss to the film world. So gifted, so young.

    RIP

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    Riley
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    Oct 11th, 2010
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    #153762

    What.

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    Tyler [Last Name]
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    Nov 19th, 2011
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    #153763

    He went from Searching for Sugar Man, to Searching for Jesus Man.

    RIP Malik! 

    FYC: Ready Player One. Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Visual Effects, Original Score, Production Design, Director and BEST PICTURE (make it happen Oscars!!)

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    Scottferguson
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    #153764

    It is curious that this was the only film project he was ever involved in of any sort. No indications that he had anything to follow it up ( he finished the project almost 3 years ago). Usually when someone wins an Oscar at this level, the doors open for multiple projects and lots of activity. For whatever reason, it didn’t seem to happen in his case. 

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    Atypical
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    #153765

    Cause of death now reported:

    “Searching
    for Sugar Man” director commits
    suicide aged 36


       

    by Niklas Pollard and Anna Ringstrom, REUTERS


    STOCKHOLM Wed May 14, 2014 2:11pm BST


    (Reuters)—Swedish film director Malik Bendjelloul, whose
    documentary “Searching for Sugar Man” won an Oscar last year, has
    killed himself, his family said, triggering tributes for a man who “chased
    the world for stories to tell”.


    Police said Bendjelloul, who was 36, had died late on
    Tuesday in the Stockholm area. His brother later confirmed local media reports
    that he had committed suicide.


    “I can confirm my brother has taken his own life,”
    Johar Bendjelloul said in a text message to Reuters.


    “Searching for Sugar Man”, structured like a
    mystery, followed two South African journalists trying to track down American
    singer Sixto Rodriguez after his disappearance from the public scene.


    Rodriguez had failed to achieve fame in the United States
    but, unbeknownst to him, had become a popular and influential folk icon in
    South Africa.


    “Searching for Sugar Man” swept major awards
    from the U.S. directors, producers and writers guilds, and won audience and
    special jury awards at the Sundance Film Festival.


    It also helped make Rodriguez, now aged 71, better known
    in the United States and led to a revival of his musical career.


    Sony Pictures Classics, the film’s distributor, led the
    tributes to Bendjelloul on Wednesday.


    “Much like Rodriguez himself, Malik was a genuine
    person who chased the world for stories to tell,” it said in a statement.


    “WHIMSICAL
    GENIUS”


    “He didn’t chase fame, fortune, or awards, although
    those accolades still found him as many others recognized his
    storytelling,” the statement said.


    Fellow directors mourned his passing.


    “He made a great film & will be missed,”
    U.S. filmmaker Michael Moore said on Twitter.


    His former employer, Swedish public service broadcaster
    SVT, said it would run a memorial programme about Bendjelloul on Wednesday
    evening.


    Nicholas Wenno, a reporter at Sweden’s daily Dagens
    Nyheter, described the filmmaker as “a whimsical genius who saw the world
    in his own way, who seemed fuelled by atomic energy”.


    “We are many that will mourn you,” Wenno added.


    Bendjelloul was born in the town of Ystad near Malmo in
    southern Sweden, according to film database IMDB.com.


    He also directed television documentaries about rock
    singers Elton John, Rod Stewart, and Bjork and German electronic music pioneers
    Kraftwerk, the Swedish Film Institute said.


    (Addtional
    reporting by Anna Ringstrom and by Eric Kelsey in Los Angeles, Editing by
    Gareth Jones)


      

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    Stardust
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    #153766

    RIP. I find it so selfish and cowardly. 

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    Scottferguson
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    #153767

    Sorry, but I find judgmental statements like that extremely offensive.

    You don’t know the circumstances and factors involved, do you? 

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    Stardust
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    #153768

    I’m not ignorant of the fact that it’s a very touchy subject and a controversial stance. And your kind of response is most expected. I’ve personally no interest in a back and forth here on this matter, but I will say that no one takes their life for alien (to humanity) reasons. Humanity is cognizant of the spectrum of emotions/states, certainly of the negative class that motivate such acts; sad, unloved, worthless, guilt-ridden, decieved, apathetic, numb, emptiness, etc; nothing alien. We’re not snowflakes. Personal details aren’t needed to take such a stance on the act itself. It’s my opinion that it is, apart from obviously a painful ordeal, a selfish (when one leaves family/friends) and cowardly act, and I really feel for those they leave behind (if so), for at the very least having to carry a heavy, painful burden of mixed bag, likely conflicting emotions and thoughts. And I find it appalling that there people that condone or excuse such an act. I’m also not sure why there’s tipically no activation-link in the brain between taking one’s own life and taking another person’s life. That’s all.

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    Scottferguson
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    #153769

    I was part of group counseling when a close friend of mine nearly succeeded in killing himself. One of the major takeaways was that telling someone who is thinking of it that it is cowardly and will hurt others often encourages, not discourages, suicide (because A) it usually comes from low self-esteem and B) it is often meant to hurt people. Alternatively, since much suicide is prevented out of fear, some who succeed feel that they have conquered cowardice, and raising that as an issue is very counterproductive.

    I also had reinforced the complicated nature of the action and one should resist the impulse to make judgments.

    But most of all, the sense I got is the vast number of reasons, some occassionally even logical, that go into the action. Often the worst thing is the lack of understanding after the fact.

    And since none of us knows anything about the circumstances, I do think it is wrong to make sweeping statements out of sheer ignorance and insensitivity. 

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    Stardust
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    #153770

    “sheer ignorance and insensitivity.” I can just as easily label you that for immedaitely reaching such a conclusion about me without knowing anything about me, my field of study, or if i’ve had any experience with it/victims. Spare me a 101 lecture. No, suicide isn’t often merely to hurt people, the aching or apathetic/numb self is usually the prime drive/motivator. You disagree with my stance, I got that. Cheers.
     

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    Scottferguson
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    #153771

    The statement was made in general, as it was meant to read, not specifically about you.

    Feel free to piss on his grave. That’s your right. 

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    Stardust
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    #153772

    Gasp, how crass. I am a lady.

    Eta; ftr, (in the case the contrary is assumed) I’m not judging the man himself or any particular person (that would be judging anyone and everyone who’s ever felt negative emotions, myself included), but denounce the act itself -killing oneself-, regardless of who commits it. I don’t condone the act of murder, I similarly don’t condone self-execution. As I stated, I’ve utmost sympathy for and empathize with anyone in pain (seems ludicrous to evidently need to emphasize that)

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    babypook
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    #153773

    I cant and wont judge the man. It was his life. However, I’d like to know what kind of help he was seeking (strongly suspect), if he was at all  and track that history.

    It’ll tell me what I want to know.

    Again, RIP. And thank you. I loved Searching for Sugar Man. He’s left us with a brief and brilliant legacy.

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    Atypical
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    #153774

    Bendjelloul suffered from extended bouts of depression, according to the family statement.

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