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Spielberg Wants A Stricter Oscar Eligibility Policy For Streaming Titles

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  • M: The Original
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    #1202800915

    Steven Spielberg is advocating for Oscar rule changes that will force Netflix to adhere to more traditional theatrical rules:

    https://twitter.com/IndieWire/status/1101489771984019458

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    kellis
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    #1202800987

    Just saw this on Twitter. I mean I agree that Netflix should be releasing all its movies for more than just three weeks, but I’m sure he’ll get a huge pushback from the rest of the branches (especially since Scorsese, Pacino, and De Niro are in the mix next year). It’s also trash that he supported Green Book just so Netflix wouldn’t get a BP win. Artistically and culturally, Roma would’ve been 100-times more worthy than GB and the latter is who he supported is so disappointing (but I guess that’s for another discussion).

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    M Bocioaca
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    #1202801373

    I’d argue that we wouldn’t even have heard of Roma without Netflix being behind it. Spielberg should also consider what Netflix does for films that couldn’t otherwise be made. A unconditional ban on Netflix titles would be the final nail in the coffin for the Academy.

    Now we know why Green Book won, I guess.

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    Brayden Fitzsimmons
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    #1202801384

    Simpsons.gif

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    Brayden Fitzsimmons
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    #1202801387

    I’d argue that we wouldn’t even have heard of Roma without Netflix being behind it. Spielberg should also consider what Netflix does for films that couldn’t otherwise be made. A unconditional ban on Netflix titles would be the final nail in the coffin for the Academy.

    Now we know why Green Book won, I guess.

    This, to paraphrase what Cuaron said in his post Globe press conference, what other studio would put time and capital into a black & white Mixtec film about an indigenous Mexican woman.

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    Gabriel Guarin
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    #1202801393

    Netflix should actually distribute their films for theatrical releases and not just be complacent knowing that people will see their movies at their homes.

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    SHT L
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    #1202801446

    I think Spielberg doesn’t understand the difficulty of getting movies made under the classic system for POC and women and other niche groups often ignored by Hollywood. He’s been Hollywood royalty for so many decades now that he is now THE MAN and the industry that people used to say snubbed him.

    This thread speaks for me:

    https://twitter.com/franklinleonard/status/1101888967694200832

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    Arias
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    #1202801448

    Interesting.

    I don’t think Spielberg is trying to ban Netflix and other streaming services from submitting their content for oscar consideration. I think he would like to see their films get a real theatrical run in order to qualify. Is that unfair?

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    SHT L
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    #1202801453

    Couldn’t they use the same rules they have for like documentaries and short subjects? Not all of them have theatrical releases right? Or like only seven days in L.A. and NYC or something like that.

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    Anonymous
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    #1202801491

    So that 100m$ budget netflix movies will have to compete for the TV movie Emmy instead? Ew

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    ENGLAND
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    #1202801508

    I get the fear behind it though. Streaming ruined the music industry completely. He might fear the same will happen for movies.

    What he need to do is protest the price of food/popcorn at the movies. It’s more costly than the movie.

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    Eddy Q
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    #1202801512

    If the proposed rule-changes go ahead, I’m concerned for future Netflix film aquisitions similar to Roma that won’t realistically receive a 90-day exclusive theatrical window but then presumably won’t be eligible for Emmys either. They’ll be left in a no man’s land, awards-wise.

    I sympathise with Spielberg’s concerns but I wish there could be more nuance in the discussion of what constitutes a true ‘film’.

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    BenNunis
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    #1202801638

    I think Spielberg is right in wanting Netflix films to get a real theatrical release and window till being available on streaming to qualify for the Oscars. Otherwise, what makes these films any different from a made for TV movie besides the budget and prestige? Is it so bad to release a film in theatres earlier in the year, and allow it to be available on streaming by late November? The film can always be released in theatres again, for those people who want to see it on the big screen. I mean if Netflix spent 40-50 million on Roma’s Oscar campaign, couldn’t they spare a fraction of that to keep the film in select theaters. If that means people have to wait awhile to watch a film at home, is that so wrong? This is not a basic right such as a right to education or a right to free speech or a right to bear arms (haha).

    Also, there is no obligation for the American film industry to make foreign language films ‘readily available’ in smaller cities. It is up to the production companies to do it if they so choose. Nor is the obligation of the Academy to nominate foreign language films to be in contention for other awards at the Oscars or other awards ceremony. Remember the FLF category is in place to keep these films in their place, so to speak, with the odd crossover, like Amour and Roma in recent years.

    Also, I thought that there is a significant percentage of Spanish speaking people in America, so is Roma really a foreign language film to them?

    After all the hullabaloo about how the awards ceremonies always get it wrong, why the big kerfuffle about people of color and women not getting award season nominations and wins? What awards did Do The Right Thing get? But it is still iconic, no? And Roma is still the best film of the year, no matter what awards ceremonies said. So, if people really thought it / other indie films should get the exposure it needs, there are heaps of column space in media and social media to recommend it. It doesn’t have to have an Oscar stamp, does it (as del Toro so astutely said)? Especially as people keep saying the Oscars always get it wrong. Why all the vitriole directed at Green Book, instead of praising Roma? No need to put one film down to lift another up.

    Spielberg is not asking for a ban on streaming services. He is just asking to make the qualifications for award ceremonies proper so that the films are legitimate big screen films. I mean other streaming services like Amazon have this theatre release run and window before making it available on their platform, right?

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    The Night Fury
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    #1202801652

    I think Spielberg is right in wanting Netflix films to get a real theatrical release and window till being available on streaming to qualify for the Oscars. Otherwise, what makes these films any different from a made for TV movie besides the budget and prestige? Is it so bad to release a film in theatres earlier in the year, and allow it to be available on streaming by late November? The film can always be released in theatres again, for those people who want to see it on the big screen. I mean if Netflix spent 40-50 million on Roma’s Oscar campaign, couldn’t they spare a fraction of that to keep the film in select theaters. If that means people have to wait awhile to watch a film at home, is that so wrong? This is not a basic right such as a right to education or a right to free speech or a right to bear arms (haha).

    Also, there is no obligation for the American film industry to make foreign language films ‘readily available’ in smaller cities. It is up to the production companies to do it if they so choose. Nor is the obligation of the Academy to nominate foreign language films to be in contention for other awards at the Oscars or other awards ceremony. Remember the FLF category is in place to keep these films in their place, so to speak, with the odd crossover, like Amour and Roma in recent years.

    Also, I thought that there is a significant percentage of Spanish speaking people in America, so is Roma really a foreign language film to them?

    After all the hullabaloo about how the awards ceremonies always get it wrong, why the big kerfuffle about people of color and women not getting award season nominations and wins? What awards did Do The Right Thing get? But it is still iconic, no? And Roma is still the best film of the year, no matter what awards ceremonies said. So, if people really thought it / other indie films should get the exposure it needs, there are heaps of column space in media and social media to recommend it. It doesn’t have to have an Oscar stamp, does it (as del Toro so astutely said)? Especially as people keep saying the Oscars always get it wrong. Why all the vitriole directed at Green Book, instead of praising Roma? No need to put one film down to lift another up.

    Spielberg is not asking for a ban on streaming services. He is just asking to make the qualifications for award ceremonies proper so that the films are legitimate big screen films. I mean other streaming services like Amazon have this theatre release run and window before making it available on their platform, right?

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    SHT L
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    #1202801676

    I sort of get the point, but awards obviously mean something otherwise Spielberg wouldn’t be wasting his time on this. So if it’s important enough for Spielberg to care about it, why shouldn’t POC and women and other groups who would love to be welcomed into the space and for whom that award would mean the world to them also protect their interest?

    I also don’t understand your diatribe about foreign films. You sort of lost me there. Either way, society will change no matter what the Oscars do and Oscar will adapt to it whenever it’s ready.

    That all being said, I don’t think having a theatrical window then releasing it on Netflix is a bad idea, but a 90-day or whatever window seems arbitrary. Also, how will a stricter theatrical release requirement affect smaller independent films and other sorts of films that rely on awards buzz to get wider releases? Take away their ability to get awards buzz and then those movies will have less of a chance to be in contention. To me, the whole thing is already limiting and I felt Netflix and streaming was one way for these films to capture more exposure by being this accessible and thus making potential Oscar contenders and thus the Oscars much more relevant to every day people.

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