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The “Oscar movie” is Dying at Movie Theaters

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  • RIDLEY SCOTT
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    Dec 12th, 2020
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    #1205170776

    Glass Onion did huge at only 638 movie theater. If Netflix was more Intelligent, Glass Onion will be doing 120 Million USD at 4000 Movie Theaters

    Netflix is losing a lot of money. I hated Red Notice(One of The Worst movies I ever saw) but an action movie starring The Rock, Ryan Reynolds and Gal Gadot could made 300-400 Million USD Worldwide like all The Rock awful movies did

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    Sean C
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    #1205170961

    Glass Onion did huge at only 638 movie theater. If Netflix was more Intelligent, Glass Onion will be doing 120 Million USD at 4000 Movie Theaters

    The whole reason Netflix bought it was to use it as a lure for subscribers to their service. Any money they make from theatres just comes out of the money they hope to get from subscribers, it’s not free money.

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    #1205171048

    The whole reason Netflix bought it was to use it as a lure for subscribers to their service. Any money they make from theatres just comes out of the money they hope to get from subscribers, it’s not free money.

    I known that. I think Netflix will be more successful(Netflix has been losing subscribers and money) if they copy Old Studios. Their most expensive movies like Red Notice(The Rock) getting All Movie Theaters first. 45 days later on Netflix. Netflix wants Red Notice 2 and 3 and they should do that

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    Elsa Korr
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    #1205171125

    Darling, the weird masterchef movie doing slightly better in here. It’s still playing, pretty limited but, it’s still there.

    Anya Taylor Joy is pretty popular here (at least on Twitter demographics) so there’s that

    FYC:
    Best Director: Edgar Wright, Guillermo Del Toro, Jane Campion
    Best Picture: Nightmare Alley, The Power of the Dog
    Best Actress: Kristen Stewart, Thomasin McKenzie, Rooney Mara, Tessa Thompson
    Best Actor: Benedict Cumberbatch, Bradley Cooper
    Best S. Actress: Cate Blanchett, Diana Rigg, Anya Taylor Joy
    Best S. Actor: Kodi Smit McPhee, Willem Dafoe, Richard Jenkins

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    Freeman_DC3
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    #1205171250

    It’s just bad marketing…that’s all.

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    #1205171550

    After watching the first episodes of Wednesday(Netflix, Tim Burton): Too much filler. It would have been worked way better as A Movie

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    nkb325
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    #1205171593

    Yea we also need to remember that nowadays box office is just one aspect of what makes a movie a success. Streamers are ALWAYS going to need a constant stream of new movies to fill their libraries, so realistically ANY money at the box office is kind of just icing on the cake for a lot of movies that otherwise might just shuttle straight to streaming. It’s like how movies used to flop and then become successful on DVD. These movies are making their BO, PLUS whatever hypothetical “value” they add to the streamer, which means the BO numbers are not a complete picture of whether or not a movie can be deemed a “success”

    For example, my mom is very interested in She Said, but she’s a woman in her 60’s with a full time job and she’s not really a “cinephile” who feels the need to preserve the theatrical experience, so she’ll most likely just wait till it’s on streaming or VOD and then watch it at home. If that’s where most of She Said’s success comes from, does that really make it a failure?

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    #1205173686

    The problem(maybe it’s not really a problem) is: Small dramas/small budget movies will be Go/Be Direct to Streaming. Since all small dramas are Dying at The Movie Theaters. The Movie Theaters will be ONLY for the most expensive movies. Scorsese, Spielberg and George Lucas were right

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    nkb325
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    #1205174121

    The problem(maybe it’s not really a problem) is: Small dramas/small budget movies will be Go/Be Direct to Streaming. Since all small dramas are Dying at The Movie Theaters. The Movie Theaters will be ONLY for the most expensive movies. Scorsese, Spielberg and George Lucas were right

    I don’t think that’s necessarily true. Movie’s like The Menu, EEAAO, Barbarian, Smile, Where the Crawdads Sing, Dog, all cost $30 million or less and all have proven to be profitable at the box office. They all succeeded by appealing to younger viewers, and I think Scorsese, Spielberg, and Lucas are just kind of out of touch with what the next generation of movie viewers want.

    The BIGGER problem is that so many of the up and coming filmmakers of the last few years have been shuttled straight into franchise filmmaking. Fingers crossed that some of them start making original content again, because I think if Ryan Coogler for example makes an original film again, it WILL do well at the box office.

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    RIDLEY SCOTT
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    #1205174250

    I don’t think that’s necessarily true. Movie’s like The Menu, EEAAO, Barbarian, Smile, Where the Crawdads Sing, Dog, all cost $30 million or less and all have proven to be profitable at the box office. They all succeeded by appealing to younger viewers, and I think Scorsese, Spielberg, and Lucas are just kind of out of touch with what the next generation of movie viewers want. The BIGGER problem is that so many of the up and coming filmmakers of the last few years have been shuttled straight into franchise filmmaking. Fingers crossed that some of them start making original content again, because I think if Ryan Coogler for example makes an original film again, it WILL do well at the box office.

    Dog was an action movie. EEAAO is a Sci-Fi. Smile is a Horror. Totally different. You always could do Horror, Action and Sci-Fis. All Dramas are Dying at The Movie Theaters. So, in our near future All Dramas will be/go To Direct To Streaming

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    nkb325
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    #1205179190

    Dog was an action movie. EEAAO is a Sci-Fi. Smile is a Horror. Totally different. You always could do Horror, Action and Sci-Fis. All Dramas are Dying at The Movie Theaters. So, in our near future All Dramas will be/go To Direct To Streaming

    I guess I was more responding to the (relatively) small budget movies part of your post rather than small dramas. But I think we’re forgetting (and I include myself in that) that “small dramas” have only been what an oscar movie is for like the last decade? When The Hurt Locker won in 2010 it was a BIG DEAL that a movie that small won best picture. Prior to that it generally was some sort of other genre, whether it be a musical, a thriller, a western, a biopic, etc. And frankly those movies never made much money. In the past decade they could eke out maybe 20-40 million, now they can get up to like 5-20 million. That’s actually not THAT big a drop off, and we only have to look back one decade to find a popcorn political thriller that won Best Picture. Indie movies had their 15 minutes of fame with the oscars, and it looks like now they might just have to move in a different direction.

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    Rachel615
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    #1205179220

    I guess I was more responding to the (relatively) small budget movies part of your post rather than small dramas. But I think we’re forgetting (and I include myself in that) that “small dramas” have only been what an oscar movie is for like the last decade? When The Hurt Locker won in 2010 it was a BIG DEAL that a movie that small won best picture. Prior to that it generally was some sort of other genre, whether it be a musical, a thriller, a western, a biopic, etc. And frankly those movies never made much money. In the past decade they could eke out maybe 20-40 million, now they can get up to like 5-20 million. That’s actually not THAT big a drop off, and we only have to look back one decade to find a popcorn political thriller that won Best Picture. Indie movies had their 15 minutes of fame with the oscars, and it looks like now they might just have to move in a different direction.

    I haven’t thought about it enough to come up with a longer list but quality small dramas have long been “Oscar movies.” Think of the Best Picture winner of 1957– 12 Angry Men— which took place almost exclusively in a somewhat claustrophobic jury room of an NYC courthouse. Wiki discloses it was made for $337,000 and grossed over $2 million; $2 million in 1957 is equivalent in purchasing power to about $21 million in 2022.

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