Home Forums Movies The TCM Thread

The TCM Thread

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 8 posts - 316 through 323 (of 323 total)
Created
6 years ago
Last Reply
2 weeks ago
322
( +1 hidden )
replies
70403
views
34
users
Atypical
118
AwardsConnect
41
RobertPius
27
  • Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203738690

    “A Hard Day’s Night” (1964): This is one of the defining musical concert films of our time, so on that level, I had to finally see this to try to understand what it was all about. From all that I’ve read, the film was highly influential in its day for capitalizing on “Beatlemania” before the fad ended (which was also the original title of the film before one of Ringo’s silly malapropisms cemented the title instead; the title track had to then be rushed and written by Lennon and McCartney within a matter of days). It was made cheaply as a cash grab, but with its clear box office success led to 2 Oscar nominations and a follow-up film, “Help!” It’s become a touchstone to much of the modern-day jump-cut editing techniques we see in music videos, television, documentaries, etc. I found Richard Lester’s direction to be quite manic and scattershot, but I’ve seen enough films of the “swinging sixties” to know that this was just the style back then, and I wasn’t the intended audience with my present-day eyes. The music was of course staggering. To think that at this early stage of their epic career, so many signatures tunes were here, like “Can’t Buy Me Love,” the title track, “She Loves You,” and “If I Fell,” which is one of the most beautiful ballads I’ve ever heard. The story carrying the film through was fairly flimsy. It’s basically 36 or so hours in the life of the Beatles with mobs of screaming girls at ever turn, and handlers who both keep them in check and dismiss them. Lennon has some cheeky lines here that surprised me. Ringo stole the show though, along with the actor playing Paul’s “very clean” grandfather, Wilfrid Brambell. Fun for what it was, I guess. I’ll revisit the insanely great music before watching the film again.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    vinny
    Joined:
    May 20th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203739292

    CANN0T wait for the old school horror and sci-fi movies in October. 🙂

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203778404

    “Annie Hall” (1977): I watched this film again by chance recently b/c I was restless at home and wanted to revisit some classics. It holds up beautifully, and ranks among my favorite Woody Allen films. This was originally supposed to be a much different film (one version even had a murder subplot), but eventually became the comedy classic we know today. I’d forgotten all of the technical quirks of the film, like breaking the fourth wall, the flashbacks, the talking heads, split-screens, and even the animated sequence. I can easily see why this won best picture over “Star Wars.” Genre and action bias plague the Academy to this day, and the snob appeal was too high to ignore. Diane Keaton was luminous here, and I bought into her title character’s quirks so readily with no hesitation. Comedy is Keaton’s true gift, even though she’s a great dramatic actress. I want to see her in another great role! No more book clubs nonsense or granny cheerleading squads! Annie’s the glue that grounds the film and makes it soar. It’s her prism that informs how the audience feels about Alvy at any given moment. It’s sort of funny how Allen writes himself as such an erudite, neurotic lothario, but write what you know, right? I know that he’s essentially cancelled in present-day, but Allen’s professional canon will stand on its own merits for generations to come despite his personal demons. Really glad I gave this a second view and noticed all kinds of things that I’d forgotten about.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203813230

    TCM Remembers the Oscar-winning Scottish screen icon, Sean Connery. Suave and debonair, Connery exuded charm and appeal as James Bond, and won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in THE UNTOUCHABLES (’87). Thank you for so many memorable performances. #TCMRemembers pic.twitter.com/5Vsn44Od0v

    — TCM (@tcm) October 31, 2020

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203860262

    “The Poseidon Adventure” (1972): I’ve always wanted to see this film, just so I could figure out if its reputation matched the actual product. I’ve heard many stories about how awful the film was, though in reality, it was a huge box office hit that inspired numerous “disaster epics” of the 1970s, wasn’t the critical flop I was led to believe (Ebert loved it, for example, though firmly aware of what the film was and judged it solely on those merits), and was nominated for 9 Oscars (winning 2). That’s some legacy that most films would kill for, and I imagine wouldn’t happen today. Case in point, the 2006 remake with Kurt Russell & Richard Dreyfuss that was basically an unnecessary, floating dud. I was genuinely invested in the plight of these doomed passengers, since I didn’t know who survived and who didn’t. The cast was stacked with Oscar winners, which elevated the story in places. Gene Hackman was a sturdy lead that gave the film needed weight. Maybe somewhat beneath him and not his best role, but was what the film demanded. Red Buttons, Roddy McDowall, Ernest Borgnine, Arthur O’Connell, Jack Albertson, Leslie Nielsen, etc., all had at least one memorable/campy/tragic/showy scene, but it’s Shelley Winters who steals the show from just about everyone. Did this role merit an Oscar nomination? For my mileage, no, but I’m guessing that the physical demands of the role plus the film’s most-discussed moment (Belle’s underwater swim sequence) did the trick for a “welcome back!” type nomination. Her character was also subjected to a bunch of cruel weight jokes, which could have brought about some additional sympathy votes. It certainly wasn’t a comeback narrative, since the woman constantly worked. I should also mention that ridiculous theme song that somehow won the Oscar (“The Morning After”), which wasn’t even named in the original film by that title, but “The Song from ‘The Poseidon Adventure’.” It did its job, since I can’t get it out of my head, but still. The film felt like a piece of film history I had to see at least once, but just once.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203903885

    “M*A*S*H” (1970): This was the film that defined the classic directing style of Robert Altman, which is so famous now that his successors and imitators are called “Altmanesque.” I haven’t seen the television series, which I’ve read took a more comedic and less free-wheeling approach than the film did with some key differences, but the setting and characters were mostly maintained. The cast was amazing, with Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, & Ton Skerritt leading the ensemble as a group of irreverent surgeons working in mobile Army surgical units during the Korean War. The film was all over the place in terms of plot and tone, which gave it an unpredictable nature. I also liked the subtle and overt critiques of the Vietnam War sprinkled throughout the film. One thing that’s incredibly dated here is the film’s blatant misogyny directed at one of its characters, Margaret “Hot Lips” O’Houilhan (an offensive nickname she receives in an unglamorous and delicate fashion). I know it was the era and all, and she signed onto the role, but still. Those antics wouldn’t fly today. The least they could do was gift her with an Academy nomination, which she received. Since the television series ran for so many years, it’s difficult to watch or binge. I would like to see how these characters are handl

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203904175

    “Good Morning, Vietnam” (1987): This is mostly only thought of as Robin Williams’s breakthrough first Oscar nomination. I knew of his character’s famous radio greeting since I was young, and that level of pop-culture impact hasn’t gone away. Barry Levinson’s film is a marginal oddity, though that cast included Forest Whitaker, Bruno Kirby, Robert Wuhl, and a scene-stealing J.T. Walsh as a horrible sergeant major who’s sole purpose was to make Cronauer’s tenure a living hell. When Robin Williams was on, he was on, and I’d be curious to know how much of his radio rants were from Mitch Markowitz’s screenplay or all ad-libs. The film is mostly Adrian’s fight against the military establishment with his radical “shock-jock” antics that would be incredibly tame by today’s standards. Beyond that, there’s a flimsy romance subplot and key betrayal that sets the stage for the ending. I was waiting for the other shoe to drop for the second half of the film, but when it did, I was fairly disappointed by it and the inevitable hokey conclusion that followed. I’d only recommend this film for a classic early performance from Williams, whose works takes on added nostalgic significance since his untimely passing.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Profile picture
    Atypical
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1203963069

    BUMP

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 8 posts - 316 through 323 (of 323 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
Chris B... - Jan 18, 2021
Movies
Stank83 - Jan 18, 2021
Movies
Enterta... - Jan 17, 2021
Movies