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Trailer for ‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’…

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  • PaulHJR
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    #47158

    Is now out on the Interwebs:
    http://youtu.be/JTSoD4BBCJc 

     

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    Tye-Grr
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    #47160

    Between this and ‘The Dark Knight Rises’, I’m having a nerd overload this week. Both are among my most anticipated films of next year.

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    Scottferguson
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    #47161

    What particularly impresses me about this is it looks distinctive from Lord of the Rings. It makes me wish that perhaps Jackson had directed the Harry Potter series, which needed someone of his talent to oversee those films with a singular vision.

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    rockstitution
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    #47162

    I agree with you SF, this looks distinctive from the trilogy. It looks to be pretty good, I love the colour palette.

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    Tye-Grr
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    #47163

    ^Double agreed.

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    babypook
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    #47164

    Yes! Finally!

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    Carbon Based Lifeform
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    #47165

    What particularly impresses me about this is it looks distinctive from Lord of the Rings. It makes me wish that perhaps Jackson had directed the Harry Potter series, which needed someone of his talent to oversee those films with a singular vision.

    x2

    Perhaps the apocalypse is indeed upon us?

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    babypook
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    #47166

    LOLOL!! Arent we suppose to wait a year or so?

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    BTN
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    #47167

    All the HP books weren’t even done when they started with the movies so if WB had locked one person into directing all 7 or 8 then maybe there would have been cast changes instead of director changes.

    Any director put in charge would have been chosen based on the first 4 and would have had to have done all 4 and then waited for the rest with all the tone changes that came along with the direction the books took.

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    MissyGal
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    #47168

    It looks amazing, as expected. It’ll be interesting to see if the Academy embraces The Hobbit like it did with the LOTR trilogy. 

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    nightwingnova
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    #47169

    Pure Peter Jackson. 

    What is unusual is that Jackson plays the dwarves and Bilbo more for laughs than in the trilogy.  Also, the dwarves don’t all look as aged and dwarflike as I’d imagine them to be.

    Regarding the humor, I vaguely remember that The Hobbit was written to be more of a children’s book.

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    babypook
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    #47170

    The trailer for this played before “Tintin”, and in 3-D. Absolutely amazing! A year seems like an awfully long time to wait.

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    babypook
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    #47171

    Peter Jackson Debuts ‘The Hobbit’ at Higher Frame Rate, But the Effect Is Lacking

    Published: April 24, 2012 @ 2:07 pm

    By Brent Lang

    Peter Jackson hoped that an extended look at his upcoming “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” would convince the theater owners who flocked to CinemaCon this week that higher frame rates was the next revolution in film.

    Based on the roughly 10 minutes he screened, “The Lord of the Rings” director may need to work on his pitch.

    In a taped segment, Jackson, who is in New Zealand editing to the prequel, said that raising the rate at which film is projected from 24 to 48 frames per second will enhance the 3D experience. To do that, theater owners will have to purchase a software upgrade for digital projectors.

    Also readMPAA Chief Chris Dodd: Hollywood Needs to Attract Hispanic Audiences

    “The movement feels more real, it feels smoother,” Jackson said.

    He also argued that by speeding things up, the 3D would be “more gentle on the eyes.”

    The presentation was part of Warner Bros. annual pitch to exhibitors; one that also included looks at Baz Luhrmann’s “The Great Gatsby,” Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight Rising” and Adam Shankman’s “Rock of Ages.”

    Based on the buzz that accompanied the exit from the Caesar’s Palace theater, at least some theater owners and film bloggers were unimpressed. It should be said that much of the footage Jackson screened still needed effects work — some of it had green screens in the background —  but the impact was more Spanish telenovela than “Avatar.”

    Also readChris Dodd at CinemaCon: Hollywood, Silicon Valley Must Work Together on Piracy

    The richness of Jackson’s imagery was lost because the 48 frames made each scene too crisp, if that’s possible. It looked more real, in fact — too real. Instead of an immersive cinematic experience, Middle Earth looked like it was captured as part of a filmed stage play.

    One blogger was overheard saying that it reminded him of  “I, Claudius,” a PBS series from the 1970s that is not renowned for its visual aesthetic.

    Perhaps it is something that can be smoothed out in post-production or maybe, like rock music or Twitter, it is a cultural shift lost on old fogies.

    As for the footage itself, Jackson screened shots of epic battles, confrontations with trolls and a chilling sequence with Gollum that showed that he still has a knack for finding the narrative heart in J.R.R. Tolkein’s dense mythological landscape.

    If only it looked a little more like a movie

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    Carbon Based Lifeform
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    #47172

    As reported by HUFFINGTON POST:


    ‘The Hobbit’ 48FPS Footage Divides Audiences At CinemaCon

     

    The Huffington Post
     | 

    By Mark Hanrahan


    Posted: 04/25/2012 12:40 pm Updated: 04/25/2012 7:14 p

    All is not well in Middle Earth.

    Director Peter Jackson debuted ten minutes of footage from his
    upcoming “Lord Of The Rings” prequel, “The Hobbit An Unexpected
    Journey,” at CinemaCon in Las Vegas on Tuesday, and the number of negative reactions was startling.

    Jackson is shooting the hotly anticipated film in 3D and using new
    48fps (frames per second) technology, which is twice the standard frame
    rate that has been used to make movies since the 1930s. “The Hobbit”
    will be the first major studio film to be shot using 48fps.

    Unfortunately, the new technology has not received a warm response.
    Following the CinemaCon presentation, the website FilmDrunk noted that “everyone hated it.”

    Badass Digest’s Devin Faraci said the footage had “that soap opera look you get from badly calibrated TVs at Best Buy.”

    He continued:

    “The footage I saw looked terrible … completely
    non-cinematic. The sets looked like sets … sets don’t even look like
    sets when you’re on them live, but these looked like sets. The magical
    illusion of cinema is stripped away completely.”

    An anonymous projectionist from a competing studio echoed those sentiments in an interview with Los Angeles Times. “It looked like a made-for-TV movie.
    It was too accurate — too clear,” the projectionist said. “The
    contrast ratio isn’t there yet — everything looked either too bright or
    black.”

    Not all responses were negative however. Variety film editor Josh Dickey tweeted:









    Josh Dickey

    Great Scott, THE HOBBIT in
    48 frames-per-second is a thing to behold. Totally different experience.
    Not all will like the change.

    April 24, 2012 6:51 pm via Twitter for iPhone

     

     


    And First Showing’s Alex Billington summed up the views of many (including director Jackson) with this tweet:









    Alex Billington

    There are going to be
    endless debates about 48FPS and how good/bad it looks. I just think we
    need to get used to change after 80yr of 24FPS.

    April 24, 2012 6:52 pm via Twitter for iPhone






    Advocates of 48fps, most notably “Avatar” director James Cameron and
    Jackson himself say that the technology will help address the problems
    people had with early 3D. As Jackson said last year:

    Looking at 24 frames every second may seem ok–and we’ve all
    seen thousands of films like this over the last 90 years–but there is
    often quite a lot of blur in each frame, during fast movements, and if
    the camera is moving around quickly, the image can judder or “strobe.”

    Shooting and projecting at 48 fps does a lot to get rid of these
    issues. It looks much more lifelike, and it is much easier to watch,
    especially in 3-D.

    Audiences will have to wait until December 2012, when the first of the two “Hobbit” films is released, to decide for themselves.

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    babypook
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    #47173

    Peter Jackson Responds To ‘Hobbit’ Preview Fallout: ‘Audiences Will Settle In’

    Published: April 28, 2012 @ 2:14 pm

    By Brent Lang

    Peter Jackson responded to criticism of his preview of “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” at CinemaCon this week, saying that audiences will eventually “settle into” the hyper-realistic look of the film shot at a higher frame rate. 

    In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, the director acknowledged that some did not care for the look of the film at the rate of 48 frames per second, rather than the standard 24.

    “I can’t say anything, just like I can’t say anything to someone who doesn’t like fish,” he said. “You can’t explain why fish tastes great and why they should enjoy it.”

    Also read: Peter Jackson Debuts a Disappointing ‘Hobbit’ at CinemaCon

    “A couple of the more negative commenters from CinemaCon said that in the Gollum and Bilbo scene they didn’t mind it and got used to that,” Jackson said. “That was the same 48 frames the rest of the reel was. I just wonder if it they were getting into the dialogue, the characters and the story. That’s what happens in the movie. You settle into it.”

    A New Line executive told TheWrap that there had been debate at the studio about whether or not to screen the high frame rate footage in its unfinished form, but Jackson had pushed for the preview and prevailed. The individual said that any problems will likely be fixed once the color is corrected and the special effects are finalized. 

    Jackson opted to shoot the prequel to his “Lord of the Rings” trilogy at 48 frames per second rather than the standard 24 frames, because he claims it will improve the film’s 3D imagery and better immerse audiences in the action. 

    But the 10-minute extended look at the fantasy was easily the most divisive event at the exhibitor trade show, with many theater owners and members of the media complaining that the effect was similar to a telenovela or a filmed stage play. 

    An individual close to Jackson told TheWrap that the director has taken note of the criticism and acknowledges that the technology needs work. This individual noted that the landscapes were effective, particularly an opening aerial shot of a mountain range, but agreed that the problems seemed to arise whenever an actor appeared. 

    Also read: James Cameron Has a Convert: Peter Jackson Shooting ‘Hobbit’ at Higher Rate

    The higher definition may reduce the blurriness associated with 3D imagery, but it has the added effect of heightening actors’ facial blemishes and robbing the film of its painterly quality. 

    Both individuals were confident that the technical problems will be smoothed out before “The Hobbit” premieres on Dec. 14. The film will also be available at the standard rate of 24 frames per second. 

    Though the reaction to the technology was mixed, the film itself got strong buzz. As TheWrap noted, the scenes that screened at CinemaCon showed Jackson firmly in command of his storytelling powers.

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