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What directors had the best year with two incredible films?

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  • Chris Beachum
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    What directors had the best year with two incredible films?

    Let’s just look at a calendar year from January through December.

    I’ll open with a few for discussion, so feel free to give your thoughts and add more…

     

    MEL BROOKS — “Blazing Saddles” and “Young Frankenstein” in 1974

    FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA — “The Conversation” and “The Godfather Part II” in 1974

    STEVEN SPIELBERG — “Jurassic Park” and “Schindler’s List” in 1993

    STEVEN SODERBERGH — “Erin Brockovich” and “Traffic” in 2000

     

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    Honey
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    Spielberg – “War Horse” and “The Adventures of Tintin” in 2011

    Spielberg – “War of the World” , “Memoirs of a Geisha” (producer), and “Munich” in 2005

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    jasonface
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    Akira Kurosawa (1950)
    Rashomon
    Scandal

    Alfred Hitchcock (1954)
    Dial M for Murder
    Rear Window

    Ingmar Bergman (1957)
    The Seventh Seal
    Wild Strawberries

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    lovelylovely
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    Frank Lloyd, 1929:
    •Weary River
    •Drag
    •The Divine Lady

    Victor Fleming, 1939:
    •Gone with the Wind
    •The Wizard of Oz

    William Wyler, 1940:
    •The Westerner
    •The Letter

    Alfred Hitchcock, 1940 (going to leave out 1954 since jasonface already covered it!):
    •Rebecca
    •Foreign Correspondent

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    k
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    Billy Wilder in 1957
    Witness for the Prosecution
    Love in the Afternoon
    The Spirit of St. Louis

    Krzysztof Kieslowski in 1994
    Three Colors: Red
    Three Colors: White

    Yasujirô Ozu in 1959
    Floating Weeds
    Good Morning

    François Truffaut in 1968
    Stolen Kisses
    The Bride Wore Black
    (both were nominated for a foreign film golden globe)

    Sidney Lumet in 1964
    Fail-Safe
    The Pawnbroker
    (or if you go by its U.S. release in 1965)
    The Pawnbroker
    The Hill

    Elia Kazan in 1947
    Gentleman’s Agreement
    Boomerang!
    The Sea of Grass (not acclaimed but it starred Tracy and Hepburn)

    David Lynch in 1990
    Wild at Heart
    Twin Peaks

    Spike Lee in 2006
    Inside Man
    When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts

    Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Luis Buñuel, Howards Hawks, Claude Chabrol, Carol Reed, De Sica, Jean Renoir among others were all pretty prolific and had at least two releases in the same year a couple of times.

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    jasonface
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    John Ford (1940)
    The Grapes of Wrath
    The Long Voyage Home

    John Huston (1948)
    Key Largo
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

    Akira Kurosawa (also 1957)
    The Lower Depths
    Throne of Blood

    John Frakenheimer (1962)
    Birdman of Alcatraz
    The Manchurian Candidate

    Ingmar Bergman (also 1963)
    The Silence
    Winter Light

    Krzysztof Kieślowski (also 1988)
    A Short Film About Killing
    A Short Film About Love

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    Intestacy
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    1. Steven Soderberg–2000, ERIN BROCKOVICH and TRAFFIC (nominated for the first, won for the second!)
    2. Steven Spielberg–1993, JURASSIC PARK and SCHINDLER’S LIST
    (did it again in 2002 with MINORITY REPORT and CATCH ME IF YOU CAN; then again in 2005 with WAR OF THE WORLDS and MUNICH.)
    3. Alfred Hitchcock–1954, REAR WINDOW and DIAL M FOR MURDER
    (see also 1940 with REBECCA and FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT. And again in 1956 with THE WRONG MAN and THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH!)
    4. Victor Fleming–1939, WIZARD OF OZ and GONE WITH THE WIND (#4 and #6 on the AFI list of all-time great films.)
    5. Oliver Stone–1986, SALVADOR and PLATOON
    (I didn’t like THE DOORS. But some people did, which would make 1991 a good year, since he also did JFK that year.)
    6. John Badham–1983, BLUE THUNDER and WARGAMES
    7. Mel Brooks–1974, BLAZING SADDLES and YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN
    8. John Dahl–1994, RED ROCK WEST and THE LAST SEDUCTION (these two movies had very wacky openings, but they both popped in 1994)
    9. David Cronenberg–1983, VIDEODROME and THE DEAD ZONE
    10. Francis Ford Coppola–1974, THE GODFATHER PART 2 and THE CONVERSATION (The first won Picture and Director at the Oscars, the second was nominated for Picture. Honestly, I don’t get either one of ’em, but it’s still an achievement.)

    However, only one man I know has ever logged three stone-cold classics in one year. That was the great John Ford in 1939 with STAGECOACH, DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK, and YOUNG MR. LINCOLN. So, by virtue of bulk, he wins the award!

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    • This reply was modified 7 months, 1 week ago by  Intestacy.
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    Awardsfan1990
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    Martin Scorsese in 2011 had both Hugo and George Harrison: Living In The Material World.

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