Home Forums Movies Would ‘The Big Short’ be a stronger contender if it had a different director?

Would ‘The Big Short’ be a stronger contender if it had a different director?

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
Created
2 years ago
Last Reply
2 years ago
19
( +4 hidden )
replies
1896
views
12
users
Tony Ruiz
3
Riley
2
Teridax
2
  • Daniel Montgomery
    Keymaster
    Joined:
    May 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217244

    I don’t mean that Adam McKay didn’t direct it well enough. Quite the contrary, he’d be my personal choice to win Best Director. But I feel like he and the film have been held back somewhat by his lack of prestige credits before this.

    Sure, some directors get their feet in the door without many or any known credits to their name (Sam Mendes, Michel Hazanavicius, nomination for Benh Zeitlin), but they didn’t have to overcome the stigma of being the director of “Anchorman” and “Talladega Nights” — broad comedies the academy doesn’t consider serious art.

    Despite that, McKay got BAFTA, DGA, and Oscar nominations for Best Director. I wonder, if “The Big Short” had a different, more highfalutin director attached, might it be dominating “The Revenant” instead of starting to lag behind?

    Reply
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217246

    Good question.

    I was watching the film and wishing that Mike Nichols was still here. He would have been masterful in shaping the film into insightful social commentary.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Riley
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 11th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217247

    Yes, his lack of name prestige is at the core of why people have a hard time accepting The Big Short as a serious player.  You can say that it did not win DGA and SAG and that is true, but neither did 12 Years a Slave.  A bigger issue is that people have a hard time accepting The Big Short because it was so late to the game or it seemed late anyway.  Was it really?  It went wide before Christmas, which is more than The Revenant or American Hustle can say.  It was late in the sense that its buzz came really late.  Who drums up buzz before the guilds announce their nominations?  The critics.  And they did not love The Big Short.  But!  The critics did not love The Wolf of Wall Street either or even The Revenant for that matter.  In fact, The Big Short ranks higher than both of those on Metacritic (and Rotten Tomatoes).  But they still nominated their directors because of the cachets of their names.  So The Big Short missed a lot of precursor director nominations such that it was not taken seriously until the industry announced its nominations and it seems like it has come out of nowhere.  To be clear though, The Big Short would not be a stronger contender if it had a different director.  The BAFTA, DGA and Oscar nominations for Adam McKay prove that.  The Big Short would be perceived as a stronger contender if it had a different director.

    ReplyCopy URL
    CanadianFan
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 23rd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217248

    The media wouldn’t have been so late to recognize it as a contender if someone else directed it. Still, whoever directed The Big Short would not be able to take down Inarritu or Miller. The film is just not as technically robust and grandiose, which is what the Academy has been gravitating towards as of late, give or take a King’s Speech.

    I do think the film’s chances would have gotten a boost with a different director. It probably could have beaten The Martian for the comedy GG, and the media would have propped it up a lot more. Does that mean anything? Maybe it gives The Big Short a bump in a close race, which is what it needs right about now. Make no mistake about it, if The Revenant loses to any film, it’s going to be McKay’s.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217249

    It’s an interesting question. My initial hunch was if a sitcom director like James L. Brooks could win an Oscar on his film debut, a seasoned big screen filmmaker like McKay should be capable of doing so too. That said, I have no doubt there are some stuffy Academy members who will refuse to support McKay based on prior filmography.

    ReplyCopy URL
    PJ Edwards
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217250

    It can’t really be stronger than it already is: a top 3 BP film.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Riley
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 11th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217251

    It could be top two over a film that:

    • lost PGA to it
    • also lost DGA, BAFTA, ASC and the Globes
    • was snubbed by ACE and BAFTA in editing and directing
    • has half the box office in double the time
    • won Critics’ Choice, an award with zero voter overlap against the Oscars
    • won SAG, an award for which losers are equally likely to win Best Picture
    ReplyCopy URL
    AMG
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 20th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217253

    Quite simply yes. I like to think the film would have been much stronger with another director at the helm.

    But more than that, one reason I place the film low on my preferred list pretty much across the board is because I don’t like the idea of the director of frigging Anchorman being Oscar nominated, and likely winner for writing.

    The film itself, I feel, is overhyped beyond belief, and McKay is not deserving of a place on the director list for this film. On the flip side, I oddly don’t have a problem with Tom McCarthy winning even though his last film was the Adam Sandler starring The Cobbler. And I detest Sandler.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Rooney Moore
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 2nd, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217252

    But then it would be a completely different film.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217254

    I think the problem might partially McKay.  But I think The Big Short is as divisive a film as The Revenant.  As much as The Revenant is divisive because of its length, brutality, and story, I think The Big Short is just as divisive.

    1. It’s characters are opportunistic pricks.  Granted, some of them feel bad about what they do, but essentially, they are still pricks cashing in on the misfortune of others.  

    2. The use of celebrities to explain things to the audience works for some people, and others say it’s a distracting and annoying gimmick.

    3. It’s a comedy, which historically doesn’t connect with Academy snobs.  And it’s a rather dark comedy at that.  Not everyone will get it.  

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217257

    I think if The Big Short had won SAG Ensemble, I’d be predicting it to win.  But to me, Tariq Khan’s analysis is spot on.

    Where is the passion for The Big Short? Other than PGA and WGA, where is the momentum? The Revenant seems to check off more boxes.  It’s the sweeping epic, dominated by a white male seeking revenge.  But more than anything, it has more actor, director, and tech support than Big Short.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217259

    Exactly, Nick.  I just think The Revenant has more overall support.  It’s going to win acting, directing, cinematography, maybe sound or one of the design categories.

    I really just don’t see Big Short winning editing over Mad MAx.  

    So it’s really only going to win Picture and Screenplay?? I just don’t see that happening. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Bird
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217261

    Exactly, Nick.  I just think The Revenant has more overall support.  It’s going to win acting, directing, cinematography, maybe sound or one of the design categories.

    I really just don’t see Big Short winning editing over Mad MAx.  

    So it’s really only going to win Picture and Screenplay?? I just don’t see that happening. 

    I was hesitant for picking The Big Short (and Spotlight way back when that was considered the frontrunner) because I couldn’t see a film winning only Screenplay and Best Picture. However, I started thinking that the preferrential system for Best Picture lends itself more towards a scenario like this to occur. People can have TBS only winning Adapted Screenplay on their ballot, but they can have it listed as second or third on their Best Picture lineup. If enough people consistently have TBS winning screenplay and being ranked higher than The Revenant, then I think it could wind up walking away with Screenplay and Picture only.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Mad Max Guitarist
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 24th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217262

    If The Big Short directed by someone not named McKay, we wouldn’t see the same “Big Short” we’ve seen today, would we?

    ReplyCopy URL
    Teridax
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 12th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #217264

    Let’s say this; if Big Short wins editing, it wins Best Picture for sure. If The Revenant wins, then it is definitely winning Picture.

    Mad Max is winning Editing, but the Revenant will win Best Picture.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
Chris B... - Aug 17, 2018
Movies
Freeman... - Aug 16, 2018
Movies
DaKardii - Aug 16, 2018
Movies