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HOUSE OF CARDS (Season 3) 2015

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  • Nomada
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    #341200

    President
    Underwood (Kevin Spacey) fights to secure his legacy. Claire (Robin Wright)
    wants more than being First Lady. The biggest threat they face is contending
    with each other.

    Season 3 premieres on February 27.

    Season 3 Trailer

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    Nomada
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    #341202

    Poster:
     

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    Nomada
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    #341203

    Stills:
     

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    SupaDupa Fly
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    #341204

    Yes. I’m looking forward to this. I believe that theory that season 4 will be the last one though.

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    Someonelikeme
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    #341205

    I think it will too.

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    Nomada
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    #341206

    New Teaser Underwood marriage

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    Atypical
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    #341207

    Hollywood Reporter’s review:

    House
    of Cards
    : TV
    Review

    6:16 PM PST 2/18/2015 by Tim Goodman

    The
    Bottom Line
    : The
    lack of believability and realism in the second season is at least being
    addressed early on, but the worry about the series is that Frank and Claire
    Underwood have no real challengers in their quest for power. And if that
    remains the case, all the soapy bubbles will start bursting for this series.

    Air date: All episodes streaming on Netflix starting on
    Feb. 27

    Created for American television by: Beau Willimon

    Starring: Kevin Spacey, Robin Wright

    Frank
    and Claire Underwood try frantically to hold on to what they’ve gained as it
    looks to be slipping away from them.

    Now in its third season, House of Cards has one of those problems that soap operas bump up
    against all the time: story fatigue.

    You can only ask your audience to buy into the political
    shenanigans of Francis Underwood (Kevin Spacey) and wife Claire (Robin Wright)
    for so long, given the Gumbyesque contortions that the series uses to
    entertain. That manipulation often comes at the expense of believability—because
    House of Cards refuses to restrain
    itself and often goes, in a parlance that Francis would approve of, balls out
    in an effort to make the Underwoods ridiculously ruthless and the series
    ridiculously entertaining. Unfortunately, after holding out against the cruel
    intrusion of reality, at some point in season two of House of Cards, ridiculous was the key word for pretty much
    everything in it.

    That wouldn’t be much of a problem if House of Cards was, like a true soap
    opera, keenly aware of its reputation (like, say, Scandal). Meaning, if House
    of Cards
    really believed that its ridiculousness was a wink-wink at the
    audience, its diversions from
    believability wouldn’t be so troubling. Instead, House of Cards has been the poster series for both the popularity
    of Netflix as a streaming service with strong original content and as a big
    player for the service at awards shows. It takes itself very seriously.

    In that role, House
    of Cards
    is often touted as a prestige drama a la Breaking Bad, Mad Men,
    and The Americans, among others. But
    if season two proved anything, with its collapsing parade of paper tigers
    standing up to Frank’s quest for ultimate power, it’s that the series is far
    more entertaining than it is great. Power wielded by a ruthless married couple
    as they sack Washington D.C. is a pretty fun thing to behold, soapy as it is
    racing toward the assured victory, the stakes-free gamble.

    There just wasn’t much gravitas in the midst of it as the
    bubbles got in your eyes.

    I’m certainly fine with House of Cards being that show. If you buy into it as a sweet,
    sparkling wine to be guzzled without care as you binge your way through it,
    that seems very apropos of what you’re getting. The danger is confusing it with
    actual Champagne.

    It’s not that.

    Awards shows are still making this qualitatively dubious
    connection (as they’ve done to an even worse degree with another soap opera, Downton Abbey). I worry that the
    creative forces behind House of Cards
    will blindly accept the accolades and not address the more glaring issues
    critics (and fans) began harping on in season two. Early episodes of the third
    season of House of Cards indicate a
    change of direction might be afoot, though plenty of worry remains that this
    will be only temporary and the Underwoods will continue to fool and rule the
    world with the ease of master puppeteers as the season goes forward.

    But at least in the early going, creator Beau Willimon
    and the many executive producers with a hand in this series seem to agree that
    maybe the Underwoods, now known as the President and First Lady of the United
    States, need to hit some road blocks that they can’t immediately get around.

    A series like House
    of Cards
    has a lot of twists to be spoiled, but there’s no point in doing
    that here—a good soap keeps the twists coming and that’s what the audience
    wants. But at least in dealing with the basic moving parts of the series, it’s
    safe to say being President and First Lady isn’t as easy or as satisfying as
    Frank and Claire expected. Both want more. Frank wants, naturally, to avoid
    being a placeholder president and focus on getting reelected. But everything
    he’s tried in office—and most of it has been ambitious—has eroded his approval
    ratings. Times are tough. He’s not being very effective and Democrats are
    dubious as to whether he’s the face of the future, especially as the
    Republicans are lining up in solidarity behind Hector Mendoza (Benito
    Martinez).

    For her part, Claire—in a storyline that harkens back to
    the Clinton years—isn’t satisfied just being First Lady. She wants to lead and
    do something. She wants to be political because that’s what’s in her blood. And
    in a lovely reflection of their odd relationship, Claire has no qualms in
    telling Frank that if he’s going down in the next election, she plans to ascend
    at the same time. Power and politics—these two understand it, even if it means
    telling the other that you’ll carry on if they fall.

    After all the cream-puff politicians and supposedly
    brilliant strategists that the Underwoods have fooled all too easily in the
    first two seasons, a little payback and a little failure plays well for House of Cards.

    However, the worry remains that now that they have the
    ultimate seats in politics, Frank and Claire won’t go down without swinging
    and, in true House of Cards fashion,
    will hit and destroy everything they swing at. If that unbelievable sense of
    dramatic stakes returns, House of Cards
    will find itself in a scandal about how good it really is.

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/house-cards-season-3-review-775215

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    Someonelikeme
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    #341208

    February 27th is coming quickly!

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    jf123
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    #341209

    Currently has a 73 out of 100 on Metacritic (positive reviews) but it will probably change because only four critics have reviewed it.

    http://www.metacritic.com/tv/house-of-cards-2013/season-3 

    Give Paul Thomas Anderson an Oscar.

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    Nomada
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    Atypical
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    #341211

    Variety’s review:

    TV
    Review: “House of Cards,” Season 3

    February 18, 2015 | 09:00 AM PT

    TV Columnist

    Brian Lowry

    TV Columnist @ blowryontv    

    “House
    of Cards” returns, and in terms of classy actors in a high-stakes setting, it’s
    solidly entertaining. Still, the series that set Netflix on the path to
    programming prestige also feels played out, as if it should have retired
    without seeking a third term. Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright remain splendid as
    the central couple, but with their quest for power having succeeded, series
    architect Beau Willimon seems forced to resort to unconvincing contortions to
    maintain the drama. Even then, the first half of Season 3 feels flimsy, having
    essentially morphed into an inordinately ruthless version of “The West Wing.”

    Those caught up on the first two seasons will know by now
    that Spacey’s Frank Underwood wheedled and schemed his way from Congress to the
    vice presidency to the Oval Office, knocking down a surprisingly ineffective
    assortment of barriers to his ascent. Indeed, a lingering criticism of the show
    is that in a town driven by deception, spin, and the quest for power, Frank has
    lacked a genuinely worthy adversary, with his opponents appearing consistently
    mismatched in the elaborate chess game he’s been playing.

    It’s a misgiving that’s exacerbated by placing both of
    Underwood’s hands so firmly on the levers of power. Being President, after all,
    comes with a lot of firepower, even if he faces a hostile Congress and the
    lingering threat of exposure for past transgressions.

    The season opens promisingly enough, with the new prez
    grudgingly engaging in a ceremonial moment that, he sneers, “makes me seem more
    human.” From there, “Cards” begins rolling along various tracks, with diverse
    crises arising, and a number of not-created-equal subplots that shouldn’t be
    spoiled—one involving the first lady (Wright), who desires to be more than just
    a photo-op figurehead.

    To his credit, Willimon remains a shrewd observer of
    modern politics in many respects, and it’s no accident that “House of Cards”
    frequently mirrors reality, and vice versa—from strained relations with
    Russia’s authoritarian leader to Underwood seeking to champion a jobs program
    basically lifted out of the movie “Dave” that’s similar to President Obama’s
    desire to use federal spending on infrastructure to bolster the economy.

    At the same time, Underwood’s plans to circumvent
    Congress are a bit too transparent early on, and the first lady’s plot is well
    played but politically hard to swallow, its homage to the Clintons
    notwithstanding. Nor do Underwood’s occasional pangs of conscience feel in
    completely keeping with the character’s win-at-all-costs nature.

    “House of Cards” is still a valuable franchise for
    Netflix, in ways both subtle and obvious. The political setting, for example,
    ensures a regular string of cameos by media figures, from MSNBC and CNN anchors
    to Stephen Colbert, creating what amounts to a multiplier effect in terms of
    coverage and credibility.

    The flaws, however, have always kept the show from being
    fully deserving of all the praise and attention showered upon it, and while it
    remains considerably fun to watch (or binge), its shortcomings look somewhat
    magnified in this third season. Yes, this handsome political drama effectively
    established Netflix as a home for premium-quality programs, and it’s
    simultaneously one of this nascent medium’s best programs, but it’s also a
    franchise whose legacy might be tarnished in part by not quitting while it was
    ahead.

    Then again, in that respect at least “House of Cards” is
    merely guilty, in TV terms, of being a little too human.

    TV Review: “House of Cards,” Season 3

    (Series; Netflix, Fri. Feb. 27)

    Production

    Produced by Donen/Fincher/Roth and Trigger Street Prods.
    in association with Media Rights Capital.

    Crew

    Executive producers, David Fincher, Beau Willimon, Joshua
    Donen, Eric Roth, Kevin Spacey, Dana Brunetti, John David Coles; co-executive
    producer, John Mankiewicz; supervising producer, Frank Pugliese; director,
    Coles; writer, Willimon; producer, Karen Moore; camera, Martin Ahlgren;
    production designer, Steve Arnold; editor, Lisa Bromwell; music, Jeff Beal;
    casting, Laray Mayfield, Julie Schubert. 60 MIN.

    Cast

    Kevin Spacey, Robin Wright, Michael Kelly, Mahershala
    Ali, Molly Parker, Elizabeth Marvel, Derek Cecil, Jimmi Simpson, Nathan Darrow,
    Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan, Mozhan Marno, Benito Martinez, Reed Birney,
    Poorna Jagganathan, Kelly Aucoin, Jonathan Hogan, Christina Bennett Lind, Sam
    Freed

    http://variety.com/2015/tv/reviews/tv-review-house-of-cards-season-3-1201431390/

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    Atypical
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    Dec 1st, 2011
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    #341212

    Entertainment Weekly’s review:

    House
    of Cards
    season 3: EW review

    by Melissa Maerz

    Genre: drama; Lead Performer: Kevin Spacey, Robin Wright;
    Run Dates: 02/27/2015; Broadcaster: Netflix; Status: In Season; Seasons: 1, 2,
    3

    Posted February 18 2015—11:12 AM EST

    Ever since it began, House
    of Cards
    has been a Greek tragedy masquerading as an American one. A darkly
    comic allegory about fate, hubris, and abuse of power in Washington, D.C., it
    finds its hero, Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey), making supremely arrogant moves
    that should leave his empire in ruins, yet he never gets punished. Now that
    he’s commandeered the presidency, though, the only way to go is down. The
    Democrats don’t want him on the ballot next election. Tension over the Middle
    East is straining his relationship with the Russian president, Petrov (Lars
    Mikkelsen), who’s a dead ringer for Putin. A former confidant whom Frank has
    ignored starts working for an Underwood rival. (Netflix has asked that critics
    not spoil this character’s identity—though if you watched any of the leaked
    episodes, you surely know whom I’m talking about.) Whether that person wants
    revenge or just inside intel to help Frank remains to be seen. Either way, the
    gods will surely punish Frank soon: One hilariously over-the-top scene finds
    him in church, accidentally knocking over a Jesus statue.

    Thanks to frequent backstabbing, heavy-handed symbolism,
    and Spacey’s deliciously hammy performance, House
    of Cards
    works best as a mordantly funny melodrama. The form is fitting—as
    creator/executive producer Beau Willimon once said, “Politics is theater. It is
    all about perception.” But Frank’s wife, Claire (Robin Wright), also gives it a
    conscience this season, as she works to free a gay rights activist who’s
    imprisoned by Petrov’s regime. She’s still a manipulator like Frank, and
    watching her under-mine her enemies is thrilling: Check the scene where she
    humiliates a man in the ladies’ room. But she’s also a good foil for her
    husband, earning more allies with diplomacy than brute force. Her face-off with
    Frank over the protester is a highlight of the first six episodes, raising the
    question of whether it’s best to speak up for what you believe or shut your
    mouth for the greater good. Both are trying to square their ideals with their
    self-interest.

    If House of Cards
    were a true Greek tragedy, this season would end with Frank getting karmic
    retribution, whether it’s from Claire, his former associate, or a new political
    reporter (Kim Dickens) who’s bent on exposing corruption. But at a time when
    the real-life government is so often gridlocked, it’s still satisfying to watch
    him make power moves and actually get what he wants. He might be evil, but he’s
    very effective. Besides, this is Washington. If his downfall comes, he’ll just
    wait four years and rise again.

    Grade: A-

    http://www.ew.com/article/2015/02/18/house-cards-ew-review

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    24Emmy
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    ETPhoneHome
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    #341214

    Campaign posters:

    http://mashable.com/2015/02/26/house-of-cards-underwood-campaign-posters/

     

    Sesame Street parody:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92NXMtVtv8o

    The Sesame Street parody is GOLD. Does anyone know exactly what time it comes online? Is it tonight at midnight, or is it sometime tomorrow?

    Come participate in this year's Goldderby Rankings! http://www.goldderby.com/forum/movies/2017-goldderby-rankings/

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    24Emmy
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    #341215

    [quote=”24Emmy”]

    Campaign posters:

    http://mashable.com/2015/02/26/house-of-cards-underwood-campaign-posters/

     

    Sesame Street parody:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92NXMtVtv8o

    The Sesame Street parody is GOLD. Does anyone know exactly what time it comes online? Is it tonight at midnight, or is it sometime tomorrow?[/quote]

     

    Tonight

     

    Beau Willimon @BeauWillimon  ·  11h 11 hours ago

    Sorry folks, had my math off with the time diff here in London. To be clear launch is 12am PT, 3AM EST, 8AM GMT. Game on!

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